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I have population count data from http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/data/set/gpw-v4-population-count-adjusted-to-2015-unwpp-country-totals-rev11/data-download

gdalinfo <filename> outputs the following:

Driver: GTiff/GeoTIFF
Files: gpw_v4_population_count_adjusted_to_2015_unwpp_country_totals_rev11_2020_30_sec.tif
       gpw_v4_population_count_adjusted_to_2015_unwpp_country_totals_rev11_2020_30_sec.tif.aux.xml
Size is 43200, 21600
Coordinate System is:
GEOGCS["WGS 84",
    DATUM["WGS_1984",
        SPHEROID["WGS 84",6378137,298.257223563,
            AUTHORITY["EPSG","7030"]],
        AUTHORITY["EPSG","6326"]],
    PRIMEM["Greenwich",0],
    UNIT["degree",0.0174532925199433],
    AUTHORITY["EPSG","4326"]]
Origin = (-180.000000000000000,90.000000000011568)
Pixel Size = (0.008333333333334,-0.008333333333334)
Metadata:
  AREA_OR_POINT=Area
  DataType=Generic
Image Structure Metadata:
  COMPRESSION=LZW
  INTERLEAVE=BAND
Corner Coordinates:
Upper Left  (-180.0000000,  90.0000000) (180d 0' 0.00"W, 90d 0' 0.00"N)
Lower Left  (-180.0000000, -90.0000000) (180d 0' 0.00"W, 90d 0' 0.00"S)
Upper Right ( 180.0000000,  90.0000000) (180d 0' 0.00"E, 90d 0' 0.00"N)
Lower Right ( 180.0000000, -90.0000000) (180d 0' 0.00"E, 90d 0' 0.00"S)
Center      (   0.0000000,   0.0000000) (  0d 0' 0.00"E,  0d 0' 0.00"N)
Band 1 Block=43200x1 Type=Float32, ColorInterp=Gray
  Min=0.000 Max=602380.375 
  Minimum=0.000, Maximum=602380.375, Mean=34.841, StdDev=317.269
  NoData Value=-3.40282306073709653e+38
  Metadata:
    RepresentationType=ATHEMATIC
    STATISTICS_MAXIMUM=602380.375
    STATISTICS_MEAN=34.840728916583
    STATISTICS_MINIMUM=0
    STATISTICS_STDDEV=317.26907812658

Now, resolution is 30 sec, as the name of the file suggests, so I am wondering where does that number 602380.375 come from? How can I use gdal or any other software, such as e.g. ArcGIS or QGIS or GRASS to figure out the lat/long coordinates of the above number? gdalinfo -stats gives only the maximum, not the argmax.

marked as duplicate by Mikkel Lydholm Rasmussen, Community Apr 22 at 11:44

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