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I am trying to edit a layer that's stored in a file geodatabase on a shared server. While editing, the "General function failure" message appeared for said layer and a number of the features disappeared from it.

After restarting ArcMap, restarting my computer, working in a new MXD and adding in the layer straight from the source (no layerfile), the data is missing AND I cannot edit into it.

I'm trying to copy and paste into it. It looks ok in the attribute table, showing the new records as selected, but there's no feature showing on the map. And once you clear selection, the new records no longer exist. There's no query or symbology set, it is as raw as you can get it.

Has anybody else had something similar?

  • there might be trialing lock files in the geodatabase folder desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.5/manage-data/… you might need to flush them out - check the folder is not read-only as well – Mapperz May 15 at 20:23
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    File geodatabases on external file shares have half the performance of local disk, and are much more vulnerable to corruption. Depending on how the write fails, you could face a total data loss event. Sometimes it seems like everything is okay, and the next write attempt finishes the corruption. Once you get a write failure, I wouldn't trust anything in the FGDB. – Vince May 15 at 23:12
  • File geodatabases are not multi-user and are easily locked by other users or processes just looking at the data contained, if such a lock or a network hiccup occurs during editing your database will become corrupt and will be unrecoverable. Do not edit file based data over the network (file, personal geodatabase or shapefiles), copy the geodatabase to a local location, edit and then copy back to the server; If you want your data in a shared server investigate PostGIS which is a multi user database. – Michael Stimson May 16 at 2:26
  • If you can see any older records worth saving, they are usually recoverable by dumping everything out to XML using Export tools. But if you have a good backup, use that instead because XML rebuilding is tedious. – danak May 16 at 18:02

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