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Lately, I've been trying to use lat/long information to plot on QGIS without any good results because I lack the correct EPSG code for the coordinate reference system. This is not the case with Google Earth, which always plots in the correct places using lat/long information.

I concluded that Google has an automatic way to discern them an select the correct coordinate reference system, and other posts have also suggested it. Is there a way to know which one are they using for my data?

45.801417207831314,9.092656559575259
45.801417207831314,9.092656559575259
45.801417207831314,9.092656559575259
45.801417207831314,9.092656559575259
45.801421972667725,9.092675509431874
45.80142711235822,9.092700934521718
45.8014346957649,9.09272071353453
45.80144571424553,9.092746763378287

Note: my data is from Como, Italy.

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    By definition, you can't determine datum by coordinate value. You need a known set of locations. – Vince Oct 22 '19 at 11:19
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    in general you should use epsg:4326 for lat/lon data unless you have more information for the datum – Ian Turton Oct 22 '19 at 11:38
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    if your data is plotted in the wrong place it is most likely due incorrect axis order, so QGIS thinks your data is lon/lat instead of the lat/lon that it is – Ian Turton Oct 22 '19 at 11:39
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Google Earth uses EPSG:4326 (WGS84). If you put coordinates into Google Earth and they look correct, then they are probably EPSG:4326.

And as one comment mentioned, do check your lat,lon vs lon,lat order. In Google Earth a KML with a Point will use lon,lat (eg: 3.028,54.825 for a point in the North Sea) in the KML itself, but the search bar in Google Earth expects the reverse and more common order of lat,lon (eg: (eg: 54.825,3.028). Most other software will also use lat,lon.

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