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I have 2 layers, which are placed separately, but they create the schematic. Hence their cooperation is highly essential. I've styled them in order to match the schematic requirements. Now I have the problem with modifying these 2 layers at once. I can do it just separately for every layer.

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I tried to create the virtual layer as per the query below:

Moving two layers with different geometry at once with snapped vertices in QGIS

and tried to enable these 2 layers for moving:

  select l.fid, l.'Cable Size', l.'Length (m)', l.'Cable ID', l.TM,l.PM,l.'New Bild',l.layer, 
  ST_Shortestline(l.geometry,pt.geometry)
  from Simplified l
  join 'Span Type' pt, X pt, Y pt, OH/UG , Type pt, 'ASN ID' pt, Quantity pt, THP pt, TM pt
  on pt.fid=l.fid

I want to keep all the attribute columns as they stand.

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that's why I plotted them into this formula. Unfortunately, I am getting an error, that the formula is not valid.

How can I enable these layers to be movable both at once? Is it possible to keep these 2 attribute tables intact?

UPDATE:

Another approach, which comes to my mind is launching

topology editing.

Unfortunately, it doesn't work either in this case.

2 Answers 2

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One of the approaches is Topological editing, available in the Snapping Toolbar, which can be opened as follows:

View -> Toolbars -> Snapping toolbar

or Project -. Snapping options

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Next after toggling the "Topological editing" option, we should make both layers editable and use the Vertex Tool for all layers. If you have a QGIS version newer than 3.16? you should get both layers at once. In older QGIS versions for the first time you will pick up just one layer, but secondly, both of them will be editable simultaneously.

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Use the Vertex Tool in "All Layers" mode, then use the appropriate technique for selecting all the vertices you want to move (see the button's tooltip for a list of options) to move everything at once.

This doesn't ensure topological integrity as described above, but is an effective way to edit features in a "network" while keeping everything together.

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