10

I think you are looking for the Delineate TIN Data Area tool: Redefines the data area, or interpolation zone, of a triangulated irregular network (TIN) based on its triangle edge length.


10

You're not actually 'reprojecting' the data (the coordinate system, that is), you're simply multiplying it by a constant (as in the 'times' tool in ArcGIS) to change the pixel values from one number to another, so you can use the QGIS Raster Calculator to do this.


10

Script: import arcpy, traceback, sys, os pntFile=arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) rasters=arcpy.GetParameterAsText(1) rasters=rasters.split(';') theFields=[x.name.lower() for x in arcpy.ListFields(pntFile)] result=arcpy.GetCount_management(pntFile) nF=int(result.getOutput(0)) p=arcpy.Point() try: def showPyMessage(): arcpy.AddMessage(str(time.ctime(...


9

You mention 3D Analyst so I am assuming you have ArcGIS. Use the tool ArcToolbox-3D Analyst Tools-Raster Surface-Slope to create a slope surface from your LiDAR data. Use the tool ArcToolbox-3D Analyst Tools-Raster Reclass-Reclassify and give all the values > 5% slope NoData, and all the areas <=5% slope a value of 1. All the pixels with a value of ...


7

Workaround for what you describe in absence of spatial analyst: arcpy.Buffer_analysis("target","../buffer.shp", "100 Meters") arcpy.FeatureVerticesToPoints_management("buffer","../points.shp","ALL") arcpy.AddField_management("points", "PID", "LONG") arcpy.CalculateField_management("points", "PID", "[FID]") arcpy.Near_analysis("points", "target","LOCATION") ...


6

Sorry for bumping this old question, but a Python module's name cannot begin with a number, so arcpy.3d will never work. To import the module, you'll need to reference ddd: from arcpy.ddd import * or: from arcpy import ddd A geoprocessing tool can be referenced in arcpy by either arcpy._ or arcpy... For 3D Analyst, the toolbox alias is '3d' but the ...


6

You can build a terrain dataset from points or lines as well as ASCII grids. No need to convert to LAS points, all you need is a multipoint feature class (which can be created from any of the above).


6

If you do not care about what happens between your two ends (not that this is dangerous for long roads in hilly regions), here are the steps : 1) feature vertices to points (ask for START and for END) 2) extract values to points (for both sets of points, don't forget to check the "interpolate" box) 3) join by attributes (based on ID) the starts and the ...


6

3D analyst's Add Surface Information will add a Z field to your vector data with the data value from the overlapping raster layer: Interpolates surface elevation properties for point, multipoint, and polyline features. That's for v10, I didn't catch which version of ArcGIS you were using.


6

There is no Layout View in ArcScene. You can export your scene to JPG by using File > Export Scene > 2D... and selecting JPEG in the Save As Type drop-down of the Export Map dialog.


5

I've never used the viewshed tool so I can't speak to the specifics of using that tool, however in regards to your suggestion in this question I will add an answer here to build on KHibma's solution. The first thing we need to address is the format of your SQL query: "[OID] = count". As it stands, this query will fail since "count", as represented here, is ...


5

I don't know of a way to enable Z values afterwards, but here's a workflow to create a new polyline with Z enabled and copy the existing fields and data over: 1) Create a new polyline feature class which stores Z values. 2) Import the existing fields from the old polyline feature class. 3) Right click the new polyline feature class in ArcCatalog and go to ...


5

From your diagram it appears that you're interested in the points where the change in gradient is the most. Since the gradient of a line measures the rate of change (i.e. can be considered the derivative), then the gradient of the gradient is the rate of change of the gradient (i.e. can be considered the second derivative). So from this assumption we can say ...


5

Turn on the 3D Graphics toolbar, adjust some of the default text graphics properties before you add a label so that it is added large enough to see/find. Select the 3D Text tool Use the 3D Text tool to click on the feature you want to label, and type in the label you wish to display. Adjust the label properties for orientation and size. I've created a ...


5

Your workflow will be something like this (you don't mention what software you're using but this should work with anything). Basically you just need to add your pine trees to the DEM as if they were solid ground. This won't account for any possible gaps in tree coverage, and it won't account for any differences in viewshed due to the trees' leaves being on ...


5

I think your error is a result of performing a slope calculation on a DEM that isn't in a projected Coordinate Reference System (CRS). The reason for performing a transformation/warping of your DEM is to ensure that the X (Longitude) and Y (Latitude) units correspond with your Z units (elevation in metres). Since you mentioned that your data was in the ...


5

When you type arcpy.ddd into the python console in ArcMap or ArcCatalog it notes arcpy.ddd is: arcpy.ddd The 3D Analyst toolbox provides a collection of geoprocessing tools that enable a wide variety of analytical, data management, and data conversion operations on surface models and three-dimensional vector data. The toolbox is conveniently ...


5

You can take the DEM and run the "Slope" tool in 3D Analyst. It is under the "Surface" Toolset. Choose "percentage" as the output type. Once you have the "Slope" raster you can run the Reclass tool to find the ideal slope you are needing (5%). You can reclassify 5% as 1 and everything else as 0. You could add additional classes to identify those areas ...


4

First you need to enable the extension (if you have the license for this): Create TIN (3D Analyst) http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//00q90000001v000000 You can search for this:


4

The steps outlined by radouxju worked great; I added a few more specifics to the process I followed. 1) Run Data management > Features > “Feature Vertices to Points” on centerline feature class twice – once for start and once for end 2) Run Spatial Analyst Tools > Extraction > “Extract Values to Points” on the start and end feature classes, choose “...


4

you can do this with the raster calculator, but probably not as easy as a sum because you probably have NoData values where there is no forest . In this case, here is a more robust method : Con(IsNull("converted_polygon"), "DEM", "DEM" + "converted_polygon" )


4

ArcScene is great for displaying 3D data and 3D analyst has some good 3D geoprocessing capabilities but as far as 3D editing goes it is VERY limited. You can construct 3D lines programmatically with ArcObjects but since ArcScene is not a true 3D editing environment you will not be able to create a 3D object, cross sections, vertical slices or manually ...


4

If your application is running inside of ArcGIS your product license should handle the activation of extensions for you. Failing that you can always use ArcObjects to check out the required extensions. How to use extensions (ArcObjects) Extensions provide additional functionality to applications. Before using the functionality provided in an extension, ...


4

Perhaps one of these two methods will work for you: ArcMAP Select by Location 3D relationships and ArcScene Select by 3D Box How about Inside 3D (3D Analyst)? Since the output of Extrude Between is a feature class with multipatch 3D features, can you use this tool to identify the 3D Point features which are within the resulting soil horizons? Can you use ...


4

It is possible to turn borehole logs (XYZ points) into 3D polylines. I wrote a sript a few years ago that did just that but it was with ArcObjects. Each group of points had a unique value and I just looped and constructed 3D lines using the points as ToPoint and FromPoint and assigned soil type attribute to each line. Once complete I symbolized on soil type ...


4

Per the help file: Hard and soft qualifiers for line and polygon feature types are used to indicate whether a distinct break in slope occurs on the surface at their location. A hard line is a distinct break in slope, while a soft line will be represented on the surface as a more gradual change in slope. See also this KB article, which provides ...


4

GIS wont be a big drain on your graphics card. You might not want to hear this, but even an Intel integrated graphics chip will do fine. I definitely wouldn't go for a workstation graphics card, they are used for precision, not performance, and are way too expensive. If I were you, I'd get something nice and light so that you can carry it around for school ...


4

If you have access to Spatial Analyst, you could use the Zonal Statistics tool. You could treat each cell in the angled vector grid as a zone, and use Zontal Statistics to calculate the MEAN elevation within it.


4

You can do this with Hawthorne Beyer's free Geospatial Modelling Environment, (GME, formerly known as Hawth's Tools). There is a tool in there, Intersect Points With Raster, which as its name implies, acts like the Intersect tool in ArcGIS but allows you to intersect a point layer with a raster, like the Extract Values to Points tool. You can also apply an ...


4

The toolbar is designed to work with a "SurveyGeodatabase", which is created in the first step of the Toolbar workflow. Unless you are working with a set of total station data, I think the toolbar is not the right fit for your needs/task. This step in the toolbar actually relies on ESRI's "TIN to Raster" Geoprocessing tool, which can be accessed from ...


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