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10

Use a dictionary and if/else with list comprehension to replace the words: Pre-logic: def replacename( names, new_names): d = {'Lane':'Ln', 'Road':'Rd', 'Street':'St'} return ' '.join([d[word] if word in d else word for word in names.split()]) Call with: replacename( !names!, !new_names!)


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When logged in to Google you can "Add a missing place" from the sidebar: Where you can add in the address details:


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I contacted Royal Mail about this, the additional fields (in order are): Address Key Organisation Key Number of Households Locality Key More information about Address and Organisation Keys can be found in the “Structure of the PAF® database” section of the Programmers Guide (page 22) at https://www.poweredbypaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Latest-...


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1. Make it Case Insensitive Change your dictionary to use all lower-case keys. (eg, 'dr': 'Drive' ). Then change your assignment statement to use the lowercase version of the value as the key to your dictionary: row[0] = d[row[0].lower()].title() (I would leave out the title() myself, and just make sure that the dictionary values are all correctly title-...


2

If you only want to use the abbreviations for labelling then you could investigate Using an abbreviation dictionary and the About abbreviating and truncating words page: Abbreviation dictionaries allow the Maplex Label Engine to shorten long labels to fit within small spaces. When you use an abbreviation dictionary, the Maplex Label Engine first ...


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From the address file, do a Join by Attribute on PIN field to the PIN table, keeping all records. The addresses that do not have a matching PIN will have null values in all the PIN table part of the record (the last fields). To be safe, Select by Attribute on the PIN table's ObjectID/OID field is null. (This ensures that there really is no match because ...


1

According to this metadata page, the bounds are reported in WGS84, but that doesn't necessarily help much since the bounds of the data set may (and in this case, are) in a different coordinate system. Using shpdump(1) I got the coordinates of some of the points in the shapefile and started comparing them with various projection systems. It looks like MGI ...


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In the metadata itself its address is defined with its components separated individually, for example <gmd:address> <gmd:CI_Address> <gmd:deliveryPoint> <gco:CharacterString>Rue Vautierstraat 29</gco:CharacterString> </gmd:deliveryPoint> <gmd:city> <gco:CharacterString>Brussel/...


1

You don't necessarily need to build your own address locator. Though if you want to do so, I'd suggest your state department of transportation (I see that you are located in the US) for publicly-available road/address range data that you can use in your locator. You could also use a geocoding service. Two such possibilities are: The ArcGIS Online Geocoding ...


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Don't know a way to this through ArcMap whithout using python. But you can do it through excel. Use Table to Excel tool, then in excel use Find and Replace. And in arcmap join the excel back to the original table. If you don't have excel you can export the table to csv using Export Feature Attribute to ASCII tool, and then use OpenOffice.


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Not sure if it's still actual but: Have you ever had you locator working with the original "50000 lines of magic Xml" file? If Yes and you just need to clean up the file to 400-600 lines, I'd suggest to delete them by small pieces and rebuild the locator after each update. In order to catch the part that you mistakenly deleted.


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Is Google Maps utilizing knowledge of historic street names but providing the updated street name? As you guessed, Google does update their Geocoding data time by time from various sources. One of them I know, would be their partners. On top of updating addresses, they would also, for example, update street view. How do I know it is locating the ...


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Yes, there is a service to do that. It is called reverse geocoding and there are a few providers out there who can do that for you. The ones that are completely free will have some location offset from the actual target that can be from 50 miles to 1000 feet. An example of such a service is OpenStreetMap. If you follow the OSM link for an address 99 Monroe ...


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