35

Step 1: Share your route in Google Maps In Google Maps, create the route, then share it to get a link to the directions. Step 2: Convert the route to a GPX file Using the handy convert feature at GPS Visualizer (http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/convert_input), paste the link you copied from Google Maps, select GPX as the output format and download the file. ...


11

I have created a couple of ArcGlobe videos in the past (~4yrs ago) that look to have about the same video quality as the NPS video you referenced. The key that I was told (and found to be true) was to: use keyframes to allow the software to create the appropriate transition between locations, capture the video at 4x - 8x times SLOWER than you want to ...


11

Not sure if standard GIS packages are going to give you what you need. You might have to get into 3D animation/visualization packages such as Vue (paid, but not too $$, maybe around $1,000 US) or Blender (open source with HUGE community). I'd love to know what the NPS used to create the flyover you referenced. I'm currently struggling with getting real ...


9

Try a sliding window of sorts. You can buffer 10 layers at a time. Start destroying layers and removing them from the DOM and memory once you reach 10 layers. So once you hit layer 10, layer 0-9 are destroyed and layers 20-30 are loaded with visibility to false. This will give you a buffer of about 10 layers but you can modify your tolerance as you see fit ...


9

Take a look at the animation package. One of the functions worth exploring, that does not require 3rd party software, is "saveHTML". Using the "saveHTML" function in the animation package is very straight forward. Here is example code where I create an animation of a randomized population change. The "expr" argument defines the plotting function you want ...


8

One of the most spectacular animated maps I've seen is Google's Wind Map.


8

Leaflet author here. The vectors should redraw properly. The quote by @nathansnider is referring to the fact that vectors are not reprojected, but they animate with a CSS transform during animation. If they don't redraw, you should set up a JSFiddle test case and file an issue on GitHub. update: they currently redraw, but are not reprojected until the ...


7

The animation that you linked (below) is an animated GIF image. It is essentially a series of images that are cycled through, which creates the animation effect. Think of it like clicking through a series of slides, one every second or so. What you need to do in order to create the animation is: 1) Create each individual 'frame' that will be shown. 2) ...


7

We can build a flashFeatures method in this way (give it a try in the QGIS Python Console): from qgis.gui import QgsHighlight from PyQt4.QtCore import QTimer from PyQt4.QtGui import QColor timer = QTimer( iface.mapCanvas() ) lstHighlights = [] def flashFeatures( featureIds ): global lstHighlights for f in iface.activeLayer().getFeatures( ...


6

Here are two options: QGIS Time Manager ArcGIS Time Slider


6

Natural Scene Designer is an excellent tool for fly throughs. It's affordable too. However, I'm not certain about flying underground. Although, if you have sketup pro you should be able to create something. This methodology used to work with the free version of sketchup, but doesn't anymore, it should work with the pro version. To get your terrain data ...


6

GeoNode is a platform combining different open source projects (Django, GeoExt, OpenLayers, GeoWebCache, GeoServer, GeoNetwork) for the management and publication of geospatial data. E.g. used by Mapstory which offers infrastructure for animated maps with a historic perspective:


6

Can drop marker like google maps using this Third party plugin bouncemarker And here is a demo Demo


6

Sort of. Break the gifs into one tiff for each step of the animation (eventually internally compressed), bake the time of the frame into the name, and then build a mosaic with time dimension enabled (http://docs.geoserver.org/latest/en/user/tutorials/imagemosaic_timeseries/imagemosaic_timeseries.html)


6

A wonderful tool to create an animated ground overlays KML file is simplekml, "a python package which enables you to generate KML with as little effort as possible." The following is a quick and dirty reproduction of the TimeSpan Example you mentioned before using simplekml: import simplekml kml = simplekml.Kml() ground1 = kml.newgroundoverlay(name='Blue ...


5

Unfortunately no! It is referred to as Marker Bounce Effect. This is in the wish-list for Leaflet but not implemented yet. Please up-vote, so that we can see this feature soon, or if you are really up for it, you could build your own bouncy marker as a 3rd party plugin. Such plugins can be created by extending the core Leaflet.js. Refer to one such example ...


5

The new mosaic datasets are time-aware and can be published as image services (requires Image extension) Esri has a javascript sample , and if you look at the image service details you can see that there is a time extent along with the normal spatial extent, and even the Query operation supports time. This is definitely a neater solution (provided you have ...


5

See here how to easily make movies with raster data: http://grass.osgeo.org/wiki/Movies


4

Geoserver has an animated gif option: http://geo-solutions.blogspot.com/2011/11/animate-your-maps-with-geoserver.html but it doesn't give you an interface, to create an interface you should use a javascript library like OpenLayers, check for example the timeslider in GXP: http://gxp.opengeo.org/master/examples/time-viewer.html


4

The easiest way I know to do this is to digitize a path around the object in question in ArcScene (make sure your polyline contains z-values), then select this path and use the animations toolbar to create a flyby from path. When you do this, you should have your screen centered on the object you want to focus on. Right click on the object and select "Set ...


4

This is as far as I go. You should be able to figure it out based on this code. Once again, since your problem is not reproducible I had to create dummy data to illustrate the solution. One odd aspect in using spplot is that since it uses lattice to create the plot you need to create an object and then print the object. Otherwise you do not get a plot. ...


3

check out i2Maps here. it gives you ability of animation with a js library. in addition to this you should glance at my que here about Openlayers Animation Examples and Algorithms. It provides a flexible programming framework for knowledge discovery from spatio-temporal data and web-oriented visualisation. The Javascript library is used for building ...


3

Try Time Manager for QGIS. This introduction seems to indicate it will do what you want.


3

Some great examples in the links there! One thing not mentioned in your links, which should be useful, is OpenLayers' Strategy.Refresh call. In this you can set a time interval for refreshing a vector layer automatically. Also, I create 3D animated landscape visualizations for public participation in planning and they are stand-alone (not web-based), so I ...


3

I have done a similar thing using OpenLayers. My use case was actually points not polygons but the principle is the same. I stored the data in a PostGIS back-end and used a simple Python script to update the PostGIS store on a periodic basis (every 10 miliseconds in my case). I then used Geoserver to server the PostGIS layer as a WFS service. If you then ...


3

Right now there is no way to export a torque animation, though export to video would be a cool new feature. The way I'd go about it would be to make an animated gif of the torque map playing. I like licecap a lot for animated gifs. If you wanted a real video file then I'd just find a screencast software that supports the video format you want and record the ...


3

Torque doesn't support polygons... yet! But you can experiment with D3, I took a first stab using D3 and CartoDB to achieve something, http://andrewxhill.github.io/cartodb-examples/intensity-time/index.html


3

Imho, what you see in http://videohive.net/item/infographics-3d-map-kit/4835077 has nothing at all to do with GIS anymore. It's an animation done by an artist and should be treated as such. You won't find a GIS which can create anything remotely this artistic. It's just not at all part of the GIS toolchain.


3

My usual method is to use the convert utility from either ImageMagick or GraphicsMagick to convert a sequence of still images from a variety of formats, including PostScript, and output a variety of other formats, such as an animated GIF or MNG. For example, from a directory with several PostScript files, make an animated GIF with 0.2 seconds between each ...


3

Yes, the geometry type makes no difference. This example has lines: https://youtu.be/l29bOvGutBw Start by extending the CSV with a column containing the line geometry in WKT format. Then load that into TimeManager. LineString(x0 y0, x1 y1) Coordinates can be as as precise as needed.


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