5

In 3.0 you can use QGIS's built in flashFeatureIds method on MapCanvas objects canvas = iface.mapCanvas() layer = iface.activeLayer() my_features_ids = [42, 43, 45] canvas.flashFeatureIds(layer, my_features_ids) This method also lets you modify the style of the flashing


2

The GeoJSON source method has an option to indicate the 'date' columns. Can you try with something like this? const dateColumns = ['date']; const options = { dateColumns }; const newSource = new carto.source.GeoJSON(JSON.parse(this.source), options); :wave


1

Your updateLayer function should look like this: function updateLayer(value){ // Get min stretch value from user. var min1 = slider.getValue(); // Get max stretch value from user. var max1 = slider1.getValue(); // Set a new visualization definition based on user min and max. var visNDVInew = {min: min1, max: max1, palette: palette1}; // Remove ...


1

Steps 1 through 5 of that guide are about creating a time-stamped route. You already have time-stamped data, so those steps are not appropriate for your situation. Add your CSV into QGIS as a delimited text layer. Proceed from Step 6: Fix Symbology.


1

Late answer, but better than never... First of all I think you need one graduated style that matches all of your columns, i.e. if an attribute value ranges from 0 to 30 at the beginning and from 20 to 50 some periods later your style should cover values from 0 to 50 to make things comparable (and otherwise my approach does not work). I have created a small ...


1

Time series in GeoServer tend to be collections of rasters or single vector files. So you need a single shapefile with a date column in it, the animation will then allow you to show the various features in the layer that match the time settings.


1

A bit of a roundabout method, but here's what worked for me: Make a shell script w/ gdal_translate to extract all bands as separate .tif files gdal_translate -b <bandnum> in.tif out<bandnum>.tif (Optional) For my case I needed to apply a custom colormap to each .tif file, so I used MultiQML + Qgis console. Output:colored<bandnum>.tif ...


1

Yes. If you load a gif into QGIS as a raster you can use a World File to locate it geographically. Since its world unicorn day, here's a Unicorn GIF loaded into QGIS: note that it will not animate. The image is loaded as a raster with 80 bands. I think each band is a frame of animation but you'd have to play with it to make it animate. What I've shown is a ...


1

You can find the code from each chapter at https://github.com/Robinlovelace/geocompr/tree/master/code/chapters. The code for the first animation is at https://github.com/Robinlovelace/geocompr/blob/master/code/08-urban-animation.R, and for the second one at https://github.com/Robinlovelace/geocompr/blob/master/code/08-usboundaries.R.


1

readOGR syntax can be a bit unfriendly at times. Here's a suggestion. Assuming your shapefile path is - C:/Users/Merry/Desktop/ro_judete_polgion.shp, the following should work: library(rgdal) #try without specifying a layer ro_judete_poligon <- readOGR("C:/Users/Merry/Desktop/ro_judete_poligon.shp")


1

Looking at your requirements I would suggest you to use kernel-density: http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/tools/spatial-analyst-toolbox/kernel-density.htm


1

There are multiple things going wrong in the second script you provide. I will list them from top to down so you can make this work: Your defined your palette without brackets (it should be a list) and you did not provide all necessary commas and quotation marks. var visNDVI = {min: 0, max: 0.8, palette: ['FFFFFF', 'CE7E45', 'DF923D', '...


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