27

Under "Advanced Editing" there is a Button for "Explode Multi-Part features". Worked just fine!


23

It means that the field is indexed. You can change the character used to indicate whether a field is indexed under the Table Options > Appearance menu:


21

A more elegant solution is: "Classes" in ('14','15',....)


19

You can use the Multipart To Singlepart (Data Management) tool which: Creates a feature class containing singlepart features generated by separating multipart input features.


17

In layout view, open the legend properties and browse to the Items tab (see above picture) where you can specify which items show the count. If you were asking specifically about showing the count in the Table of Contents, I'm not sure how this can be done. I looked around but only found this helpfile from ArcMAP that states For example, you can use ...


17

As mentioned in my comment above, there isn't a way to do this using dynamic text. However, you could write a script to do this and attach it to a python addin button or to run when you save the MXD or something. You'll need to create a text element to hold the credits and name it something like "CREDITS" as so: The basic code would look something like ...


17

Error 000358means "The SQL expression is invalid", as described in Help - ArcGIS Desktop Your query, "Id=k", means that "get Idand k (field) value of a feature, compare both, if both are equal, select that feature". Since there is no kfield in poligon layer, you encounter an error. Even if k existed as a field, any feature whose Id and kfield are equal ...


16

File geodatabase size and name limits […] File geodatabase size: No limit Table or feature class size: 1 TB (default), 4 GB or 256 TB with keyword Number of feature classes and tables: 2,147,483,647 Number of fields in a feature class or table: 65,534 Number of rows in a feature class or table: 2,147,483,647 Geodatabase name length: Number ...


16

They probably set it to a fixed extent. If you right click the data frame, go to properties, and under the "Data Frame" tab you can set the extent to "Automatic" which should allow you to move things around.


15

The function below is based on Ryan's idea, but is a little more direct. ArcGIS map documents are actually OLE documents, which can be parsed with the oletools module (available on pypi: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/oletools). The function opens the file and reads the version string. Tested with 9.0, 9.3, 10.1 and 10.3, but should work with anything (not ...


15

If I understood you correctly, you have to move the selection anchor first: use edit tool and hold down the CTRL key drag selection anchor to the corner of your borderline More information in ArcGIS Help.


15

After some more digging, this post answers my question: http://blog.technicallyliving.com/2013/08/arcpy-testing-for-selected-features/ desc=arcpy.Describe("layer_name") desc.FIDSet u'3; 4; 5; 6' The author says "FIDSet will return a semicolon delineated string of selected FIDs. When none are selected, it is blank". Problem solved, I think. Any other ...


15

You can use subprocesses to take advantage of multiple cores within a Python script, so that several tasks can run in parallel. But you can't split a single task over several cores. See a detailed explanation in this FAQ: Does ArcGIS 10 support multi-core processors and/or 64-bit Operating Systems? If you're a seasoned Python user, you might be interested ...


14

With ArcGIS 10.1 it is possible to disable add output to the application display with arcpy.env.addOutputsToMap = False http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//018z0000004s000000


14

The ArcSDE APIs date from the earliest days of ArcSDE. It was how you interacted with the data stored in a RDBMS. This was before there were ArcToolbox tools or many ArcObjects classes and methods. Because of this, the ArcSDE APIs have almost no support for geodatabase objects beyond points,lines,polygons--no feature datasets, network datasets, etc. The ...


13

This works with a standard ArcGIS license: desc = arcpy.Describe(fcl) shapefieldname = desc.ShapeFieldName gebieden = arcpy.UpdateCursor(fcl) for gebied in gebieden: polygoon = gebied.getValue(shapefieldname) for punten in polygoon: for punt in punten: print punt.X, punt.Y


13

You would need to break up your selection statement into two separate parts: "Classes" = '14' OR "Classes" = '07' Edit: Changed from AND to OR, since as noted in the comments, AND cannot work in this situation.


13

I would recommend using the data access module da with the Update Cursor as you will notice significant performance improvements. The following is the correct syntax to replace <Null> (aka None) values with 0. import arcpy fc = r'C:\path\to\your\FGDB.gdb\andFC' with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(fc, ["Field_Name"]) as cursor: for row in cursor: ...


12

Have you consider to use GRASS GIS analysis? I have expirience that GRASS algorithms have very good accurance on hydrology analysis. For example, I want to generate something like drainage network on DTM with resolution 5x5m. I had compared tools from ArcMap (including ArcHydro Tools) and you can view the result on first picture (red lines). Then I tried to ...


12

We had a big need for a similar capability and ended up building a general, free, open source Python library for the purpose. You can find it at https://github.com/ucd-cws/arcpy_metadata or by running a "pip install arcpy_metadata". There is some documentation of features and how to use it, with some additional contributions from the World Resources ...


12

This is typically something you can do with Data Driven Pages. The static text and images is not a problem, you can modify one lay out and this will be transmitted to all other layouts. For the dynamic text, it can be driven based on one of the attribute fields using this syntax " domainlookup="true"/> The most complicated part is what you show on the ...


12

Something like this should work: def reverse(s): items = s.split() digs = ''.join(i for i in s if i.isdigit()) dr = digs[::-1] return ' '.join(map(None, items)).replace(digs, dr) >>> reverse('321 test') '123 test' @mnpeterson brought up a good point about assuming where the numbers are...My post above would string all digits ...


11

I've developed a formula for the average width of a polygon and put it into a Python/ArcPy function. My formula is derived from (but substantially extends) the most straightforward notion of average width that I've seen discussed elsewhere; that is, the diameter of a circle having the same area as your polygon. However, in the question above and in my ...


11

The WGS_1984_Web_Mercator_Auxiliary_Sphere coordinate system is a PROJECTED coordinate system, its units are METERS. Your coordinates are read in meters so they fall near the origin of the coordinate system which is the meeting of the equator and the Greenwich meridian. If you want to map Lat/Long coordinates (degrees), use a GEOGRAPHIC coordinate system (...


11

The accepted method did not work for me because my basemap layer wouldn't show up in the Input Features dropdown. I solved this by doing the following: At the View menu, choose Data Frame Options. At the Data Frame Tab look for "Clip Options" Choose Clip to shape Then click the Specify Shape button Then select the boundary layer as input Apply and the ...


10

In ArcGIS 10.1 and later, there is a tool called COGO - located in the Editor Toolbar/More Editing Tools/COGO. On the tool bar there is a button called Reporting COGO descriptions. This reporting tool has a feature called "Angle between two lines" which reports the angle between 3 points on a line.


10

def getFieldNames(shp): fieldnames = [f.name for f in arcpy.ListFields(shp)] return fieldnames fieldnames = getFieldNames("country.shp") returns a list of all fields of country.shp


10

Provided your Z units are the same as your X and Y units: You have it almost right. Adding the negative values would give you the total volume of the increase. HOWEVER, this would only be your answer if there were no POSITIVE values in the resulting attribute table. (If your resulting rendered shows any red and no blue areas) What this means is that ...


10

Do a spatial join! First, set up your data frame in a projected coordinate system of your choice (whatever units you want your distances to show up in). So, say you're working in State Plane Feet, make sure all your layers are in State Plane Feet, so if they're not project them into it. From there, Right click on the points layer and click Joins & ...


10

The asterisk means that the field has an index. A Shapefile does not have any indexed fields by default, you need to add them. A GeoDatabase Featureclass always has a spatial index on the Shape field and attribute index on the ObjectID.


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