19

The help file says: Can ArcGIS 10 be installed on the same machine as ArcGIS 9.3.1? No. For users who want to install ArcGIS 10 and ArcGIS 9.3.1 on the same machine, Esri recommends using a virtualization tool (such as VM Ware's VM Workstation or Microsoft's Virtual PC) and install the new instance of ArcGIS on that virtual machine. We had ...


19

A couple of general tricks I have found useful in the past in this situation: Run your Python script as stand-alone (e.g. from IDLE, PyWin, Eclipse or preferably CMD) to remove the overhead of ArcMap. Spawning subprocesses is an old trick to solving ArcGIS memory leaks even if you don't want to parallize a process. It works because the memory is released ...


16

You can use a conditional (Con) statement in the raster calculator or the con tool in ArcToolbox. The below statement is evaluated as [IF myrasters > 2000 THEN 1800 ELSE myraster] Con("myraster" > 2000, 1800, "myraster")


15

You can use a conditional statement. The issue with previous recommendations is that when you rasterize your polygons (which is necessary) the background, that does not contain polygons, will be NoData resulting in corresponding areas in the output also being NoData. You will need to set your analysis extent to your original raster and then set a background ...


12

If you have logging turned on, you will be able to see your geoprocessing results in a log file. The "Log geoprocessing operations to a log file" option (under Geoprocessing [menu] -> Geoprocessing Options... in ArcGIS 10 or under Tools [menu] -> Options -> Geoprocessing [tab] in ArcGIS 9.3) will do what you're looking for. Default locations for these files ...


11

There is no need to write any additional ArcPy for this. Simply use dynamic legends (which were added at ArcGIS 10.1) when you are authoring your maps. The Map Extent Options allow you to control how eligible legend items interact with the current map extent. If the Only show classes that are visible in the current map extent check box is checked, a ...


10

A .lpk file is just a ZIP file. If you rename it (or just open in a ZIP file tool) you should find an "iteminfo.xml" file that will contain further information about what's inside. Here's a diagram of the structure, click through to see the Esri docs on it:


10

I have tried supervised classification in ArcGIS. Firstly I would say that it is not the best software for classification. As I did it, you can create training sites as points. Just create a shapefile (or geodatabase), add Integer field, click points over your image and assign classes as numbers. (I think you can also use polygon shapefile). For ...


9

Summary Given the sun's position, you can easily create a grid of the surface light intensity (ignoring atmospheric and topographic effects) in lat-lon coordinates. Reproject that grid as desired and overlay it on the map. Details The formulas are the standard ones for spherical coordinates: the unit vector corresponding to a spherical coordinate (lon, ...


9

Three options I can think of: Save your map document and open it when you subsequently want to work with the shapefile. This should be obvious so perhaps you have not explained why this is not working for you. Save the layer to a layer file and load that instead of the shapefile Load the shapefile into a geodatabase and set up a cartographic representation ...


8

I realise this question is tagged 9.3, but anyone looking for the same answer at 10.1 onwards is better off using arcpy.da.Walk. It is faster and more accurate than ListDatasets/FeatureClasses/Rasters/etc. import arcpy import os for root, dirs, datasets in arcpy.da.Walk('d:\scratch.gdb'): for ds in datasets: print os.path.join(root, ds) The ...


8

If you know row, column, cellsize and extent, X & Y can easily be calculated. Note this assumes a North up raster. If the raster is rotated you'll need to know the other two affine transformation coefficients (or geotransform in GDAL speak). Also note that the column/row coordinates in the below are from (0.0,0.0) at the upper left corner of the upper ...


8

This page on Esri's site should give you all the information you need to do this within ModelBuilder. Essentially you create a variable for the output folder/geodatabase -- which can be user-generated or hardcoded -- and then call it in the other tools by its name, surrounded by % symbols.


8

Every version of ArcGIS requires a specific Major.Minor version of Python (it uses the official installer releases from python.org). That version will be documented in the help. 9.3.X uses Python 2.5, 10.0 uses 2.6, 10.1 uses 2.7. Since the stack is compiled against a specific binary version of Python, other versions of Python will fail to load ...


8

Please mention the sensor of Landsat 5, is it MSS or TM? Assuming it is Thematic Mapper data, you have visible red and shortwave infrared data. You can directly infer from the band reflectance values about where vegetation patches lie and hence moisture content. Band 3 (Red) can help you discriminate vegetation slopes and Band 5 (SWIR) can help you ...


8

The add-in model is a new feature in version 10.0. This means you will not be able to use an add-in at lower versions, which require you to implement your commands, extensions, toolbars etc. in the older COM-only model.


8

GeoChalkboard can give you a good overview of the changes! Here's the list, but check it out for more detail: Replace the import statement Replace all gp. with arcpy. Check your capitalization. The result tool is different. Replace any del gp statements. The overwrite tool is different. Import the env module from arcpy. List item


8

Your question is a mélange of misinformation and cross-threaded topics, which makes it exceedingly difficult to answer. First off, there is no comparison of the "SDE API" and "MSSQL Native geodata format". ArcSDE is many things, including a code library for accessing data (not spatial data, all types of data, including geometry) in multiple SQL (and no-SQL)...


7

The tool accepts a Table View parameter, which actually includes both true standalone tables as well as table views, which are like what layers are to feature classes. See Working with layers and table views in the help for more information. You can create a table view that is a subset of the full table by using Make Table View and supplying a where clause, ...


7

In the geodatabase items table GDB_Items there will be an extry for the FeatureClass. The definition field of this entry contains the DEFeatureClassInfo definition and this has an EXTCLSID entry. For more on the new GDB schema introduced at 10.0, start with this blog post.


7

The delta tables and state tree have a direct performance impact on your queries. First, you need to understand versioning; I did a short explanation of the relationship of the state tree and version labels in a different answer. I think it would help you to go over it. After reading that answer, you can then realize how a long state id branch (from root ...


7

Consider integrating DEMs into your research on soil moisture/exposure. I have used the following indices in the past for regression models (Davies et al. 2010): Site exposure index = slope∗cos(pi∗(aspect−180)/180) (Balice et al. 2000) Heat load index = 0.039 + [0.808 * cos(l) * cos(s)] – [0.196*sin(l)*sin(s)] – [0.482*cos(a)*sin(s)] (McCune and Keon 2002)...


7

After doing some research, I found a solution and it's called Assembly Binding Redirection Basically, for any .net .exe, you can add XML code in the application config file to redirect a referenced assembly from a version number to another. Esri implemented this in 10.0 and up versions in their EsriRegasm.exe utility. (located here : %commonprogramfiles(...


7

As @Baltok alluded to, you are trying to have the Selection on a particular layer be treated in the same way as other layers are, with respect to drawing order. I think that by default, and design, ArcGIS makes the Selection override the symbology of anything that is underneath it, as a means of making it easy to find the selection. Since you are selecting ...


7

Please have a look IFeatureClass.Search Method To get feature by mouse click: public List<IFeature> Search(IPoint mousePoint, double buffer, IFeatureClass featureClass) { var envelope = mousePoint.Envelope; envelope.Expand(buffer, buffer, false); var geodataset = (IGeoDataset)featureClass; string shapeFieldName = featureClass....


7

A solution to this is discussed on the ESRI forum here: Every planar surface has a simple formula, Jesse, in the form (something)*x + (something else)*y + (constant). In the Raster Calculator, x is $$XMap and y is $$YMap. The trick is figuring out the coefficients. Often you want to specify a plane in terms of its slope (s), aspect (a), ...


6

I had a similar problem with the Tabulate Intersection tool (using 10.4). I found the suggestion to place the resulting table into a geodatabase from here: https://geonet.esri.com/thread/13680 It fixed the problem!


6

You can also review the process by looking at the geoprocessing results window. As mentioned by nmpeterson, go to the Geoprocessing menu, but then go to --> Results --> Current Session. Expand the Messages option to review the actions and processes.


6

Do you have access to spatial analyst? If so, the Con function will do exactly what you want. Create a "condition" raster that is 1 where you want the values changed to Ras2 and 0 everywhere else. Execute the statements: Ras1 = Con(Raster("condition"), Raster("Ras2"), Raster("Ras1")) Ras1.save("Ras1") This will replace Ras1 with your new raster. If you ...


6

The tool which does this is Create Fishnet - it can be used to create polygons, polylines and labels at regular intervals i.e. a grid of squares or rectangles in any coordinate system.


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