New answers tagged

0

You need to force all labels to show up using the 'Never Remove (place overlapping) option: https://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/latest/map/working-with-text/forcing-the-placement-of-all-labels-in-a-label-class.htm


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There are two main options. If you are adding new layers to the project, you must indicate the software to display the labels. To do so, right click on the layer > Properties > Labels tab > Check the 'Label features in this layer'option > Select and configure the field you want to display > Accept or Apply Could be related to labels conflict. ...


1

BERA's answer can also be used directly in the field calculator : len([val for val in [!MAN_1!,!MAN_2!,!MAN_3!] if val is not None]) Note that this works that your "null" are No Data value and not the text "null". Alternatively, as you have a small list of workers and no risk of typographic errors because of the use of a drop down list, ...


2

Using cursors seems to work: import arcpy fc = r'C:\folder\data.gdb\featureclass' fields = ['MAN_1','MAN_2','MAN_3','TOTAL_MANPOWER'] with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(fc, fields) as cursor: for row in cursor: row[3] = len([val for val in row[:3] if val is not None]) cursor.updateRow(row)


2

You dont mention what field type you have. But I have a string field called kkod with integers in it. This model is working if I use the for loop output as input to a string variable, then use the string as input to an SQL expression variable:


0

The ModelBuilder does have a for loop implementation which sounds more appropriate than while in your use case. This being said, iteration capabilities within ModelBuilder for ArcMap (which it seems you're using) are relatively limited. You can't batch custom models, and I think you are only allowed one iteration per model. To get around these, you can ...


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I had the same problem. I had struggled for two days, and by testing a simple shapefile, I found that the Width/Horizontal resolution and the Width/Vertical resolution that I had chosen were too coarse, even if I put the 0.05. I changed it to a smaller size (0.0005), and it works well!


1

I don't use the data reviewer but a very simple way of identifying points that are not at the end or on any line is to use the select by location tool and simply select all points that intersect the line dataset and ensure invert selection is ticked on.


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You can do it easily by polygonizing the aspect raster, and then calculate $Area into a new field via field calculator. This is the whole workflow.


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As commented by @Aaron: It looks like you need to define a valid output featureclass in the merge tool. It appears as if you are defining an output directory rather than an output featureclass.


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QGIS uses it's own Python path, which gets set when you launch QGIS (this should be done automatically). But if you are having issues with Python in QGIS try launching it from the QGIS.bat file from \OSGeo4W\bin or \QGIS install path\bin, depending on the installation location. ArcGIS takes over the system one. So you are fine to have both installed.


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Use Split by attributes: Splits an input dataset by unique attributes.


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As a workaround: Create a feature layer first using the Make NetCDF Feature Layer Geoprocessing tool in ArcGIS Pro, and then rasterize the created output. Specify latitude and longitude as Row Dimensions as well. Without row dimensions, the tool creates one point only using the 1st value of latitude and the 1st value of longitude.


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Typically, to calculate walking time distance, you should first conceptualize what factor represents the (main) cost of moving (walking in your case), and you should preliminarily define a cost function. One of the most used hiking functions is the one worked out by Tobler, which is frequently used in GIS-based analyses. When it comes to ArcMap, you should ...


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"..does this tool resample the DEM?" Yes, it does the resample after it mosaics the rasters in the native cell size. "If it does resample, what method is used since I cannot specify?" You should be able to specify the method in the environment settings. I like to use the resampling parameter in this tool if I'm mosaic'ing a large DEM, so ...


-1

As others point out, you can't use 'or' like that, since a string will almost always be True. What you likely want is something like this: Notice the initialysation of var, so it don't carry any old value, in case non of the criteria are fullfilled. def reclass(siteclass, tempzone, rainzone): val = 'Undefined...' if 'ST' in siteclass: # and if '...


2

Try Zonal Statistics as Table. Use your property shapefile as the input zone field, and your elevation layer as the input raster. The output will be a table with raster statistics (mean, min, max, etc.) for each input zone (i.e. ID in your shapefile). This table can then be joined back to your shapefile as additional attributes if that's useful.


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I think those techniques for looping in ArcMap are under used and essentially replaced by the iterator. You are correct in stating there is no equivalent set of options in ArcGIS Pro. You could use the FOR iterator if you wanted your model to loop X number of times. ArcGIS Pro offers more utility tools to test and control processing order. So the bulk of ...


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In QGIS, you can use Mesh Calculator (main menu > Mesh > Mesh calculator). The expression you need is average (aggr). You can filter Start and End time (temporal filter) or using Mask Layer or an extent to limit the calculation to a certain geographic area:


3

You are close. I believe you just need to return your desired text string. And make sure argument names match your variable names (if mean temperature and temperature are different columns, be sure to include them as separate arguments) def Reclass(temperature, altitude, precipitation): if temperature >= 18 and altitude < 650 and precipitation >=...


1

The syntax should be: def wType(SWPULP, HWPULP): if SWPULP>=75: return "SP" elif HWPULP>=75: return "HP" else: return "MW" Call with: wType(!SWPULP!, !HWPULP!)


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I think you solved it by now, but to benefit other users. I faced the same problem but solved it following this approach: First go to multidimension tools > make NetCDF raster layer, in the interface (see pic) select the suitable inputs but pay attention that you need to put 'time' in the 'band dimension' not band values. You will get one raster layer ...


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@ycartwhelen is correct, you do not have to clip the raster to zonal statistics. What I was doing wrong is I should have used Zonal Statistics as Table not just zonal statistics.


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To make select attribute by iterator value you must wright by this is way: lock v is capital.


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You can do that by: 1- you can use Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to create Contour lines: Download DEM for your study region from USGS website. 2- Open ArcGIS, and Add DEM you have Download. You can Extract your region from DEM by using Extract by Mask tool, if you have Polygon Layer of your region. 3- Create Contour for your Extracted DEM, By using ...


2

Dissolve with Lat and Long as Dissolve Fields and number field (SUM) as statistics:


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I have some experience in land classification in both QGIS SCP plugin and in ERDAS Imagine, never ArcGIS Suite. When I've run into issues similar to this one (such as deciduous vs. coniferous, or golf course vs. crops), the first thing I try is to experiment with the band configuration to see if there is a more desirable distinction between the classes of ...


1

In ArcGIS(ArcMap or ArcGIS Pro) you can achieve this using georeferencing. Georeferencing: It is the process of taking a digital image, it could be an air photo, a scanned geologic map, or a picture of a topographic map, and adding geographic information to the image so that GIS or mapping software can 'place' the image in its appropriate real-world location....


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I'd create 6 polygons (multiparts - Ok), and populate field by required No of points, pro-rata their areas. From that generate random points, using above field as required points count per polygon. Picture shows 6 such polygons and 50 random points. Polygons labelled by No of points required:


3

This is called "georeferencing" and requires knowing the real coordinates (latitude/longitude) of some features on the image. A Georeferencer program will input your image, then you have a workflow like clicking on a point on the image, and then clicking on a world map of where that point is. So for example your image might have some dots for ...


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I suggest you train a statistical model on these fire events using those factors as independent variables. I don't know how to do this in ArcGIS but R offers a good environment for such analysis.


3

No need for wildcards, the replace() method searches the whole string, as you can see if you test it out in the Python interpreter: >>> "Test string with F'target in the middle".replace("F'target", "F 'target") "Test string with F 'target in the middle" Double check that the exact string F'target does indeed ...


4

The project CRS is in a projection that looks flattened. Change the project CRS to another CRS like EPSG:3857 or the local UTM-zone - the ladt option is better in your case, as you have only a small area on your map). For Berlin, use DE_ETRS89 / UTM CRS, EPSG-code 25833, see: http://crs.bkg.bund.de/crseu/crs/eu-description.php?crs_id=Y0RFX0VUUlM4OSAvIFVUTQ== ...


2

Use None not NULL. Python doesn't understand "NULL" Your if else is not valid python syntax, you need if: and else: with indented lines below each You don't need to add literal strings to literal strings "<UND><BOL>" not "<UND>"+"<BOL>" String formatting is faster than concatenating (adding) ...


0

Not a direct answer to my question, but I was able to use https://github.com/rowanwins/mapbox-gl-arcgis-featureserver for my use case


-1

Install esridump via pip Example to grab layer VT VEC Poles - point Then execute esri2geojson https://maps.vcgi.vermont.gov/arcgis/rest/services/EGC_services/OPENDATA_VCGI_UTILITIES_SP_NOCACHE_v1/MapServer/81 youroutput.geojson


-2

Make sure that you started an editing session on the layer before running append.


0

You can generate a simple *.dbf file with Python as follows: import shapefile # pyshp import dbf import os.path fn_shp = "glpv1.shp" myshp = open(fn_shp, "rb") # If dbf does not exist, create one fn_dbf = os.path.splitext(fn_shp)[0] + ".dbf" if not os.path.exists(fn_dbf): r = shapefile.Reader(shp=myshp) n = len(r....


1

There is a field definition tag (for each field) in the XML Workspace Document file called <Editable>. If a field is not editable after an import from the XML Workspace Document, it is probably because this tag has been set to false. Change the tag value to true for each field that needs to be editable. Change: <Editable>false</Editable> ...


0

The following code will generate your desired output: import arcpy arcpy.env.addOutputsToMap = True arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True sr = arcpy.SpatialReference(32721) #WGS_1984_UTM_Zone_21S wkt = u'MULTILINESTRING ((421451.00299999956 6350629.8709000004, 421439.96719999984 6350607.6084000003, 421428.77199999988 6350605.3015999999, 421423.3515999997 6350581....


2

As @BERA shared that you can't convert the data type without adding a new field, and the workflow you can follow is by creating a new field(string) and populating the records into it using the field calculator. But, here is the trick, if you do not want to add a new field: I'm not sure of the application you are working but the workflow can be used in ArcMap ...


0

After research I have found that OSPAR have a marine protected areas network with downloadable shapefiles. https://odims.ospar.org/en/submissions/ospar_mpa_2021_07/


0

The problem is that you know the longitude of the first tick mark on the top, but not the latitude. Its a bit higher than 54:20N but you don't know how much. The same problem occurs for the latitude markers on the sides. But if you connect the tick markers you can then get the lat and long of the intersections. Here's how it looks with some horizontal and ...


0

You might need to update to a newer version of ArcGIS Pro/Maps for Adobe. Illustrator has a limit of around 32k vertices in a shape, and I know we put in some changes in later versions of Pro that dice these polygons if there is more vertices than can be consumed.


0

I don't have enough rep to comment on @Farid Cheraghi's answer which mostly worked for me with one change: After creating param0, if I use param0.filter.type = "Workspace" The tool shows with a red x in the Catalog pane of ArcMap. Right clicking and selecting the "Why..." menu option brings up a Python Errors window with this message: ...


0

If you need a general near distance parameter in feet you can use the following calculation to convert decimal degrees to feet. Add a field - right-click for field calculator and multiply the decimal degrees field by 364567. It won't be exact but fairly close. Information was obtained from a nautical calculation website & verified with the measurement ...


3

In python console: import arcpy fc = r'C:\GIS\ArcMap_default_folder\Default.gdb\fs_riks_Buffer' field_to_move = r'buildingID' #Create a list of all values sql = """ORDER BY {0} ASC""".format(arcpy.AddFieldDelimiters(fc, arcpy.Describe(fc).OIDFieldName)) data = [f[0] for f in arcpy.da.SearchCursor(in_table=fc, field_names=...


3

Use field calculator and create a copy of the field (let's call it key_biomechanical_features_2) with the following expression. It requires a field with unique id, corresponding to the $id (this field is here called id) that defines the order/sequence. Change key_biomechanical_features (twice) to the name of your initial field. Copy the result back to your ...


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I just tested use of kernel density and I think this is a right approach, because it gives you something objective: It seems that you have more than 1 fire.


0

It looks like I can do this with the methods outlined here: https://towardsdatascience.com/find-and-plot-your-optimal-path-using-plotly-and-networkx-in-python-17e75387b873


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