New answers tagged

2

You try the following code in the codeblock of Field Calculator: def sort_name(n): split = n.split() if len(split) == 0: return '' elif len(split) < 3: return ('{0} {1}').format(split[1], split[0]) else: return ('{0} {1} {2}').format(split[1], split[2], split[0]) The code split the text in the field and create a ...


0

I figured it out by using ModelBuilder and putting the KML into a folder.


0

I have change the ArcGIS to the newest 10.8 ver. and the newest Arc Hydro tools but the situation didn't improve. The problem was solved by assigning the HydroID attribute for the lakes feature class.


0

It might be a more suitable solution to store an attribute in your flow network to signify that it flows into said polygon. You could store the name of the National park for example, or Null when it doesn't intersect. eg: Field name called 'National Park Name' (To identify the National Park attribute, just run a quick analysis - If line intersects national ...


0

There is a plugin in QGIS called "Move Features". It may help. Download link:https://plugins.qgis.org/plugins/moving_feature/


1

A simple approach would be to use NAIP imagery to calculate NDVI with the red and NIR (near infrared) bands and set a threshold over which you consider the electrical feeders to fall in a vegetated area. The formula for NDVI is NDVI = (NIR — VIS)/(NIR + VIS) where VIS is the red NAIP band. You can calculate this in ArcGIS using raster math. However, this ...


6

I dont know of such a tool. You can use arcpy with itertools.combinations: import arcpy from itertools import combinations pointfc = r'C:\GIS\ArcMap_default_folder\Default.gdb\samplepoints' coordinates = [xy[0] for xy in arcpy.da.SearchCursor(pointfc,'SHAPE@XY')] #List all point coordinates arcpy.CreateFeatureclass_management(out_path='in_memory', ...


0

I just restarted my PC and the problem simply solved.


0

Oi represents the offsets supplied by USGS for the TIRS band calibration and since February 2014, they are out of consideration.


1

You can say it's a model or an estimate of that species might be distributed in 2070, but you don't know for certain that is where this species will be in 2070. The bioclimatic variables for 2070 are obviously a model too (so any unexpected changes in them might change species distribution), as well as there might be aspects of species distribution you haven'...


0

You do not need the X and Y fields to be numeric if you use the Convert Coordinate Notation geoprocessing tool. For example, milgrids or UTM can be in one field with spaces and other nonnumeric characters. I am not sure about the degree sign or other special characters and I can't check easily from home. The tool should produce a point file with both your ...


0

This error occurs when the location of the ArcGIS License Manager is not specified after authorizing ArcMap with a Concurrent Use License. Kindly, follow the link(Could not connect to an ArcGIS license manager running on host "Not_Set") for a better understanding.


3

The red exclamation mark is known as a broken link, you can use the MXD Doctor that can recover entities from the broken file to a new map document or to an existing map document. You can refer to the link (Using the MXD Doctor) for a better understanding You can also follow the below steps to get the layer working. In the table of contents, right-click ...


3

I am not clear exactly what you are wanting to test here. Do you have a hypothesis? You can certainly take a sampling approach in evaluating the "accuracy" of the lower resolution binominal classification along with hypothesis testing the distributional equivalence of the binominal classes. Here is a worked example, in R, of what testing a ...


0

Assuming your ID's go from say 1 to 10, you can use the FOR Iterator to create an ID value that is used to select the origin, destination, barrier using the select by attribute tool. It is that selection that feeds into the rest of the model logic. You'll want to use the ID value to create unique route layers which you could merge into a single dataset if ...


0

After some research I still don't know why this happens, but a way to avoid this is to stop using diacritics in layer names as shown in the example. When I changed the layer name in the mxd file to "povoden_z_topiaceho_sa_snehu_gc", the generated layer names are without numbers, so, to say, are OK. But why this happens I do not know in fact. Also ...


0

I was able to workaround this bug by doing the following: On the Layout tab of the ribbon, I clicked the Size button in the Page Setup button group (see picture below) and chose a different page size. I think any would do but I chose A3 under ISO Sizes. The printer margins disappeared from the page. I used the Size button again to choose my original page ...


4

No it is not possible. The Make Vehicle Routing Problem Layer tool is not a python script tool, it is a proprietary closed source binary/compiled tool. You can see at a glance what sort a tool is from the icon in Toolbox: = binary/compiled tool = script tool = model tool The documentation states that "The heuristics used in this process are based ...


0

You could use this website to convert your coordinates then you can use ArcCatalog to convert to shapefile using convert X & Y. https://www.earthpoint.us/BatchConvert.aspx


1

For coordinate your X,Y field should be numbers. You have to convert them in DD, you can do it quite easy in excel by extracting firstly DDMMSS by using functions (left and right) than convert them into Decimal Degree DD=dd+(mm+(SS/60))/60.


0

To perform this "manually" I suggest using a Definition Query on each of the 3 featureclasses. Use the unique ID of the "run" {i.e. the matching set of Source, Destination, and Barrier} as the definition query value so that only one "run" is displayed. Then perform the route calculation for this "run." Once you have ...


0

ArcGIS supports TIMESTAMP WITHOUT ZONE date type. To convert your column date in PostgreSQL you can alter your column table in the database by: ALTER TABLE instance_oasis_incident_1_0 ALTER COLUMN incident_date TYPE timestamp USING incident_date::timestamp; After such operation, your dates in ArcGIS and QGIS shouldn't be different.


5

import arcpy rasterfolder = r'C:\GIS\data\testdata\outrasters' arcpy.env.workspace = rasterfolder temps = arcpy.ListRasters(wild_card='temp*') precs = arcpy.ListRasters(wild_card='prec*') for temp, prec in zip(temps, precs): print(temp, prec) #Do something Prints: temp1.tif prec1.tif temp2.tif prec2.tif


3

I don"t know exactly what you want to do, but if the names are structured the same way you coul list one input and change its name. It is safer than making two lists if one of the prec%.tif file is missing. import arcpy from arcpy.sa import * arcpy.CheckOutExtension('Spatial') arcpy.env.workspace = r'D:\Data' rasters = arcpy.ListRasters('temp*',"...


0

Open ArcCatalog, and right click on the *.dbf file and select Create Feature Class from XY table. Then select X, Y fields in the dialog box including the coordinate system. Hit OK, then you get Event Layer in the contents. Right click in that and export data to shapefile, you are done.


0

I found that just formating the first line as text worked well. I also had to format the numbers as numbers and use points as decimal separator instead of commas in excel to be able to classify the data.


3

"another raster which is in WGS84 and has a spatial resolution of 6 kilometers" These two things can't both be true. A raster in WGS84 coordinates is defined by a regular grid in lat-long, and you can't have a regular grid in lat-long that is also an exact number of kilometers everywhere because the size of a degree of longitude changes according ...


1

Making lots of assumptions here. I think you are misreading 'Flowpath length' as a requirement to actually have a 'length' value, but I dont think this is the case. Groundwater permeation across a 5m cell grid won't vary that much on the length of the individual components of a single grid cell, so im assuming that a grid cell is either on the flowpath, or ...


1

The way to do it is using the <dyn type="layout" name="LayoutName" property="name"/> formatting tag.


2

Reasonably accurate results can be achieved without much iterations. Create 100 travel polygons with same small step to cover entire area. I did it via computing travel raster: and raster calculator Int(travel/1499.816772) Assuming that population spreads evenly over Census meshblock area: Intersect it with travel polygons and summarize population in ...


1

There are many reasons you can get this error, but here are some of the most common: Rasters do not have same extent or scale Rasters not in same geodatabase Rasters do not share same projection Output filename too long "Spatial Analyst" extension has not been enabled


3

When creating raster data in geodatabase, you do not need to add file extension such as .tif. This a mentioned in the help of Create Raster Dataset: When storing a raster dataset in a geodatabase, do not add a file extension to the name of the raster dataset.


1

I believe the issue is to do with your input, it's a CSV file, which is simply a text file not a spatial dataset such as geodatabase featureclass or shapefile. Firstly as as @Nick hints your code is missing the workspace environment setting so it does not know where in_Table is. Either make it a full path string or set the workspace. Secondly you construct a ...


1

Rename you points layer in mxd table of content to "points", it doesn't matter if it is stored in database or shapefile. I assume that field "ranga" stores type of geosite (why on Earth are you showing irrelevant fields?). Lookin at polygon table I assume it is stored as shapefile, this is why run below expression on TYPE_COUNT integer ...


-1

I had the same issue and just put spaces in front of the text in the Attribute Table to approximate centering.


0

Apologies I haven't worked with Arc for a while, but one way of tackling this problem is by using overlays. Intersect your grid and point feature classes so each point gets the ID information of the grid it's in. Then you can use Summary Statistics on the points feature class by the intersected ID field. Select the geosite type field from the grid feature ...


0

ArcGIS Pro has two ways to extend polylines that you have not mentioned in your question: You can Extend or trim a polyline feature when editing: In the Modify Features pane, the Extend or Trim tool extends a selected line feature to an existing feature boundary or trims it where they intersect. The tool pane contains one multitool that extends or trims a ...


1

Spatial Join is probably not what you need, I would suggest using Dissolve it will allow you to SUM everything based on a specific column. See the ArcGIS documentation linked above.


2

The <5% that you want could also be written as "less than five percent rise", so you want to output "percent rise". In general degrees or percent rise are just two different ways to measure the same slope. The ArcGIS "How Slope Works" page explains the math of how you convert from one to the other with some basic trigonometry,...


0

You can use spatial join if you can afford some approximation (that is, if the cells are much much smaller than the administrative polygons. Then you just need select Join on_to_one option, and define the field mapping as "mean". The difference with my previous answer is that a cell that overlaps two administrative polygon has the same weight than ...


0

There is no built in function for a precise result as far as I know, but you can achieve that in a few steps (and later automate it in python script or model builder) "Union" the two feature classes "add field" to the result of the intersection "calculate field" with the value of your grid vector multiplied with the area of ...


0

Depending on which version you're using, see if Calculate Geometry Attributes tool is available. It can calculate the geodesic length of features.


0

If I understand correctly you want to re-project your data? Check https://epsg.io/ for appropriate projections for your study area. For example, EPSG:5179 might work.


0

I can see you still have an error at the lower left side of your image, maybe this is the reason why the whole study area is highlighted as red:


1

Problem solved: Although I've not be able to track down the person who imported this data into TransCAD, I was able to get in touch with the person who exported this data from TransCAD, and walked through the choices available in the TraansCAD export dialog with him. I suggested selecting "No datum transformation" under "choice of datum" (...


1

In my experience the assigned colors can differ. However, you can check the symbology of your TIFF files. There you can find how raster values are assigned to a colour or colour scale. There you can make sure they are symbolized in the same way. Apply Symbology From Layer (Data Management) might be available to you depending on your ArcGIS version. I have ...


1

I have to repeat such task few times a day, so I developed a script (not shown) and also field calculator expression below: lr="a" tbl=arcpy.da.TableToNumPyArray(lr,("fid","Length","strmOrder")) bs=sorted(tbl, key=lambda x: (x[1]),reverse=False) dPid={} d={} for row in bs: N=dPid.get(row[2],0);N+=1 dPid[row[2]]=N d[...


0

Here's my suggestion (without knowing exactly where [pun intended] you got the shapefile from.) Outside of ArcGIS Desktop Copy the shapefile and all related files to a new folder so we don't mess anything up Delete the prj file from that new folder so the Shapefile appears to have an unknown projection Inside of ArcGIS Desktop Use the Toolbox to find the ...


0

Find the IdxGridSize and IdxOriginX/IdxOriginY values in GDB_GeomColumns for your table first. Then, multiply the MinGX/MinGY/MaxGX/MaxGY values with the grid size and add the origin values. You'll end up with the min/max coordinates in the projected system. You can convert the coordinates into lat/lon values using Proj4.js or some other tool.


2

When you "opened [the LPKX file] in ArcGIS Pro [and] found out that the functionality to add proportional piecharts is not (yet) implemented" I think you must have been using a version from before ArcGIS Pro supported chart symbology: A chart is a type of statistical graphic that represents data. Charts can be used as multivariate symbology in ...


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