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0

If anyone needs to do similar thing in the future: You can perform a Spatial Join to reducte the number of steps needed for this piece of work. Spatial Join (Analysis) >> Target Feature = fishnet grid >> Join Features = Polylines >> INTERSECT.


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Check this help info from ESRI. https://support.esri.com/en/technical-article/000007637 I was having the same problem. I changed the symbology to classified with two categorize and it works.


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I am guessing you are trying to create centerlines for polygons with this method. I saw a tool that maybe helpful for your work: Polygon to Centerline Tool for ArcGIS. I'm still trying it, but you can learn more from the original question and answers here: Create Centerlines of a Polygon Buffer Feature, ArcGIS 10.3


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If you are running ArcMap or certain versions of ArcPro you can install the Gradient Metrics Toolbox. There are tools that provide two ways to tackle this problem: 1) calculate global correlations between rasters (representing a single correlation coefficient) or 2) Calculate the local correlations thus, returning a raster representing correlation between ...


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I would suggest: 1 - As suggest by @Felix Create an empty feature class with the same structure as your feature and periodically append what you have selected to this layer. You can use the geoprocessing result to make the process faster. Just right click to the append process and choose "Re run", it will re-run the tool and automatically it will ...


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Use the Update (Analysis) tool


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You could just select rows that are L04 and field calculate them without a function. Replace function should not be used for this. It is for modifying an existing string, see: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/string_replace.htm Pre-logic: def f(aeleg): if aeleg == 'L04': return 'Mid-Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic rocks (mainly rhyolite and ...


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If you actually want H3 hexagons, you’ll likely need to preprocess the data before bringing it into ArcMap - I’m not aware of an ArcMap plugin for the H3 library. Preprocessing is relatively straightforward - just map each point to geoToH3(lat, lng, 9) and then use h3ToGeoBoundary(h3Index) to get the polygon boundary for each cell. You could do this in ...


1

I think that you should be able to do this by buffering your existing polygons using a distance perhaps 10% of the width of your smallest polygons, and using the option to have the inner borders of your buffers dissolved. This should give you a single polygon feature suitable for Creating Centrelines from Road Polygons/Casings using ArcGIS Desktop?


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This can also be done by adding a point symbol as a backgound to a label on the polygon layer and then making the label text invisible.


4

Use Dissolve: Aggregates features based on specified attributes With your land use class or whatever it is as Dissolve field


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According to Create Space Time Cube (GeoAnalytics), you can create a space-time cube and store it as a netCDF file. This can also be visualized in 2D or 3D However, as far as I know, it only handles a single variable. Maybe if you split the NetCDF file into 3 different files. I could suggest using the xarray library in Python for initially handling the ...


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You can make a query layer as suggested. Include a select statement in your definition that somehow converts your date to a numeric (calculate days like iif(x.sampledate is null,999999,DATEDIFF(day, x.SAMPLEDATE, GETDATE())) as 'DAYS', convert to UTC, etc) so you can use values to render. This works in mapserver services and in feature server services. ...


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There's a tool called Split Lines at Point in ArcGIS, maybe you can work it out from there.


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OK, I tried out the OSM Attribute Selector, and it seemed to work in a reasonable amount of time adding my missing attributes. (~9 hours). It is not ideal but better than another 2 weeks!


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I am new-bee in ArcGIS. Currently I have a task to open a bundled files like: some_map.tfw 1 kb some_map.tif 133,666 kb some_map.tif.aux.xml 2 kb some_map.tif.ovr 45,645 kb here, the tfw file seems to be a world file, and aux.xml is an auxiliary file, help ArcGIS to understand the total files. tif is the base image file, and ...


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Make Table View, where you can choose which fields to keep Make XY Event Layer, create a temp point layer Copy Features, make it permanent


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You can use the join field tool to join your DBF to the raster attribute table, then use the tabulate area tool with shapefile / country as the in_zone_data / zone_field and raster / type as in_class_data / class_field


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You must check fixed frame as pic shows to be able to resize legend and change aspect ratio once you check fixed frame, the 'preserve aspect ratio' option is no longer grey out, as pic shows. now you are free to drag to resize the legend ( aspect ratio will change when you drag )


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You need add heading in symbology tab, here is my sample: click zone_merge layer, open layer properties, click symbology tab now, click the item for example, VC village commercial, right click it, choose, "move to heading", choose 'new heading' Then, you can click others, choose move to heading, .... and so on. when you save the legend will ...


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I managed to find a way to do it. I used the reclassify tool to split the arable from the non-arable classes. Then I added the necessary fields (min, range) and I use the Lookup("rastername", "fieldname") function inside the Raster Calculator tool to do the necessary calculations with the NDVI.


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This is scale dependent solution. I will assume that at 1:2000 scale the length of 3 arrows is 25 m. I suggest to split your lines twice: a) split all the lines into same length bits and b) split every odd into 3 parts and use arrow symbol for them. For this we need 1st produce shorter version of originals. So populate new integer field (N): max(divmod(!...


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A quick search of the ArcGIS Pro Help uncovered the OD cost matrix analysis layer page: An OD cost matrix analysis layer finds and measures the least-cost paths along the network from multiple origins to multiple destinations.


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The Merge window (along with the Identify tool and other toolbar windows) use the Display property set on the Layer, not the labels. In your Table of Content right click your layer > Properties > Display Tab > Change the Display Expression Field to the field you want shown when editing/identifying.


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Create a pandas dataframe from your data and use to_csv. A workaround, but you can choose whatever delimiter you want: import arcpy import pandas as pd fc = r'C:\GIS\data\Bakgrundskartor_LMV\Vagkartan.gdb\bs_riks' #fields = ['KKOD', KATEGORI','SRIKT'] #Either list the field names manually fields = [f.name for f in arcpy.ListFields(fc) if f.type not in ('...


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Try (1.8 * ("NIR"-"Green") -3.75 * ("Red"-"Green")) / (SquareRoot(Square(2 * "NIR" + 1)-(6 * "NIR" - 5 * sqrt("Red")) - 0.5)) based on Bagheri, Ahmadi, Alavipanah & Omid 2013.


2

There is an ArcGIS Pro Idea already submitted to Add More Delimiter Options in Table Export Tools (i.e., pipe delimiter): There are several existing tools to export a table to a flat file .txt or .csv, such as copy rows, table to table, or export features rows to ASCII. The last option at least gives you the ability to choose comma, space, or semicolon ...


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Simply use the generate near table tool and ensure your point layer is both the input features and near features. Untick Find only closest feature and set maximum number of matches to 1.


1

I queried one of my friends at the National Soil Survey Center. Here is their response: There isn’t a bug. The problem is that SSURGO is a relational database and you can’t use simple joins in ArcGIS on any of the tables with the exception of ‘muaggat’ and ‘mapunit’. All of the other tables are one-to-many. This issue is discussed in both the gSSURGO and ...


1

While @Hornbydd's answer directly addresses your question, I wanted to point out that another approach to solving this would be to use Label Classes, which are the built-in solution for accomplishing exactly what what you are trying to do: label different features different ways depending on a specific set of criteria. A very very basic primer on label ...


2

You are mixing languages (VB and python), that's why your code is not working. Make sure the parser is set to PYTHON and here is an example of either printing the label in upper case or in italics: def FindLabel ( [TYPE] , [LABEL] ): if [TYPE] == "School": return [LABEL].upper() else: return "<ITA> " + [LABEL] + "&...


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As you only have 20 more maps to go I would just shutdown ArcMap and restart. An ArcMap session holds onto all sorts of things you are probably unaware of and doing repetitive things just stacks up and slow things down.


1

It most likely uses graph theory. For example there are 2 groups if graph edges are shared boundaries only: Links computed using Polygon to line. There is just one group, if both corners and shared boundary are edges of graph: Links computed using Polygon Neighbours.


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Thanks. This pointed me in the right direction. After combing the nodes as shown above, I added a Dup field to identify the duplicate records. uniqueList = [] def isDuplicate(inValue): if inValue in uniqueList: return 1 else: uniqueList.append(inValue) return 0 Dup = isDuplicate(!A_B!!) From that I could query and export the two sets of lines using Dup = 0 ...


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I was able to accomplish this by using the 'Lookup' and then 'Zonal Statistics as Table'.


1

He is a suggested workflow for you to follow: Make sure your blue lines and green points share a common ID value (integer) that links them Convert your line to raster based upon that ID, use the Polyline to Raster tool Extract from the DEM the cells under the raster line using Extract by Mask Identify the elevation under your green point for that line, you ...


0

I noticed that ArcGIS Desktop 10.7.1 was doing something strange with the text fields in the attribute table: the fields were way too wide. And when I looked at the view properties in ArcCatalog, I confirmed that ArcCatalog was interpreting the fields as being too long. (Maybe due to the underlying field type being CLOB or BLOB?) OBJECT: 257 FIELD: 4000 ...


1

A variant on @FelixIP's approach is first take one of your rasters and run it through the raster to point tool. This creates a point for every pixel. You now have a point dataset which you could apply a selection to, e.g. a particular catchment, then run it through the Sample tool as he describes above.


3

My hypothesis is that this comes from the input data, which is probably produced by the resampling of a coarse resolution dataset into a finer resolution one. Also, you seem to seek very precise height intervals with respect to the range of values in your area. A quick check would be the computation of the slope of your image (the same pattern would be ...


1

Set environment extent and cell size to your raster. Make sure workspace is also specified. In Python window type: arcpy.gp.SingleOutputMapAlgebra_sa("$$ROWMAP","nRow") This will produce integer raster of rows: Similarly compute raster of columns: arcpy.gp.SingleOutputMapAlgebra_sa("$$COLMAP","nCol") In Arcmap ...


2

Your if statement needed a little work. I re-wrote the first condition to a shorter equivalent of class=='motorway' or class=='primary' or class=='trunk' def Reclass(class): if class in ('motorway','primary','trunk'): return 'Primary' elif class == 'secondary': return 'Secondary'


4

I don't think it's possible. This is because shapefiles cannot store field names of more than 10 characters. (Shapefile is an old format from the 1990s) If you convert a data table into shapefile format, the field names are truncated (if longer than the limit). So, if you had longer field names, the information is already lost when it's converted to a ...


1

Create end points (NODES) and delete identical in shape. Transfer nodes OIDs to lines as described here to find from and to nodes of lines. Create COMBO field using something like: str(min( !TI!, !FI!)) + "_" + str (max(!TI!, !FI!)) in order to find twins: Delete identical using this field.


0

If your feature classes have aliases and/or fully qualified field names, ModelBuilder tools list aliases in field input drop downs, but check these against the field names e.g. offer "bacon test" as an option in a field input drop down, but check field names including "bacon_test". Check the field name and type this into the join input ...


1

Try using the da.SearchCursor to list all values, then update/calculate using da.UpdateCursor: import arcpy fc = r'C:\GIS\ArcMap_default_folder\Default.gdb\fs_riks_Buffer' freqfield = 'Frequency' ratiofield = 'ratio' sql = 'ORDER BY {0}'.format(arcpy.AddFieldDelimiters(datasource=fc, field=arcpy.Describe(fc).OIDFieldName)) frequencies = [row[0] for row in ...


2

Use the Reclassify tool on your Euclidean Distance output raster to set all values greater than 100 to be equal to 100. As long as you keep the default missing_values parameter set to DATA you can ignore all you values less than 100 - the original value will carry through unchanged. This way you can also play around with if 100m is actually the appropriate ...


0

While I am unable to determine their areas to create a normalizing field, I was able to just add the percentages from one map's sizing percentage field to the other's and vice versa, such that the pies are now scaled in reference to each other (this way, the percentages were able to take each other into account and display the pies in proportion to all the ...


1

I had some experience using a tool developed by Jenness Enterprises. I used this with ArcMap 9.3.1, looking on the site I see there is a 10.x version. Which should be able to give you what you need in 10.2.2. http://www.jennessent.com/arcgis/repeat_shapes.htm Citation: Jenness, J. 2012. Repeating shapes for ArcGIS. Jenness Enterprises. Available at: http://...


0

another alternative is to run your model in batch mode. First define your input file as a parameter of the model, close model builder, then right click on you model asking for batch. You can then open all the files inside you folder and launch all jobs at once. Remark: IMHO, the best alternative is to export your model in Python, where you can nest as many ...


1

Yes. Firstly, check that you are using cycle_roundtrip for the radial metric as well as the analysis metric. If the radius is Euclidean then any analysis of flows will only account for changes in route choice due to changes in traffic, whereas you likely want to model changes to mode share as well e.g. extra cycling demand generated by the lack of traffic, ...


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