3

Try this: Highlight all the records in the table. Do a Ctrl + Shift + C Ctrl + V into a text or excel file. The scientific notation stays the same when I do it with ArcMap into both excel and text files.


3

Wow. This one is subtle. It's not a bug, exactly, but it sure as heck isn't not-a-bug either. Prior to the state above I had selected a polygon and used the Explode editing tool. Although I had finished with the tool it was not deactivated. There was no visual indication in the attribute table panel that the edit tool was still active and filtering records ...


2

With ArcPy and Python you can build empty lists, and then use a SearchCursor on each layer to iterate through all the selected features and add each one to the list. Building off the example code in the documentation linked above, something like this: import arcpy fc = 'c:/data/base.gdb/well' fields = ['WELL_ID', 'WELL_TYPE', 'SHAPE@XY'] select_list = [] ##...


2

You would have to eliminate the option of using SLPK here. This is a known limitation with SLPK in ArcGIS Pro. I worked with ESRI tech support and they finally logged this as a new defect, that should be implemented with upcoming releases. I had this issue where I was trying to simply add textures to the result of the Add 3D formats to multipatch feature in ...


2

You can write output data to memory, see: Write geoprocessing output to memory Writing geoprocessing outputs to memory is an alternative to writing output to a geodatabase or file-based format. It is often significantly faster than writing to on-disk formats. Data written into memory is temporary and is deleted when the application is closed, so it is an ...


2

https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=5fa04ce288284c999f70464e1c3b2e82 While I haven't tested it, the link above appears to be for a tool that can help you create a "5 color theorem" map. It should assign a value between 1-5 to each block group and then you can assign a color fill for each value. That should mean that no two touching polygons ...


2

Dissolve your features. Your original parcel data is the input, and use 'parcelnumb' as the dissolve field. Make sure multipart features are allowed (this is the default).


2

The issue is that reading the CIM returns an array of None values in the queryFields property of the data connection. When setting the definition back on the CIM with the array of None values, the data connection on the layer breaks. A solution is to remove the queryFields attribute from the CIM and then setting the definition. layerCIM = layer.getDefinition(...


1

I am currently stuck using the old ArcMap 10.6, but you can format the numbers in the attribute table by right clicking on the field that contains your numeric data, going into the properties, and then changing the number format to "Scientific". There should be an equivalent procedure in ArcGIS Pro.


1

I am answering this question because it can prove useful to whoever is going to read this thread in the future. As someone already commented on, there is no "out of the box" solution in ArcGIS. BUT, there is indeed a viable option using a QGIS' plugin called "Visibility analysis" LINK. The interested reader may want to focus on the "...


1

They will be adjusting automatically based on the scale level, just make sure no reference scale is set on the map


1

As referenced in your Python code, your output is a derived parameter. From your screen shot, with the empty hover box, this is probably happening as you haven't filled in the required parameters up-stream of the tool that make up this derived parameter. In this case, this would be the output GDB and the mosaic name. Further, in the code of your script tool, ...


1

Follow this workflow: Create a copy of your polygon dataset converting the polygons to lines, you can use the Feature to Line tool Run the Euclidean distance tool on your polyline layer and set the environment setting Mask to the original polygon layer.


1

Get your data into a simple CSV format, then use the "XY Point Data" option on the "Add Data" menu. https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/latest/help/mapping/layer-properties/add-x-y-coordinate-data-as-a-layer.htm https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/latest/tool-reference/data-management/xy-table-to-point.htm


1

So here is your data with labels so it is easier to understand, for example: e11 should be attached with address 90 for building 2 and not the nearer 100 in building 3. A fairly simple model would achieve what you are seeking, here is the main logic: You loop over the buildings and use that to select the address points and emission points. The spatial join ...


1

No Python code is required and this can be done in model builder in ArcPro using the Fields Iterator. You need to be using at least ArcPro 2.6; earlier versions do not have this iterator. The model is simply this: The iterator filters the required fields and the calculate field tool is set up as is: Note: I had renamed the output of the iterator to "...


1

Only integer rasters can have an attribute table, so unless you convert it to an integer you will not have an attribute table to use. A trick is to convert it into integer by multiply it up by an appropriate value. For example your current float raster has numbers that are to 3 decimal places (e.g. 123.444). By multiplying this by 1000 you move the decimal ...


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