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Using ArcGIS Server and consuming a map service is one way. Or you can turn a Map (MXD) into a Map Package and consume this in the Runtime. You'll probably want to choose your solution based off 2 things: will your app have internet access? if you have internet, will you have an ArcGIS Server to host services. If the answer to either of those questions ...


3

There is a good background post about these SDKs (from ESRI) at http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2013/07/05/the-history-and-future-of-the-arcgis-sdks-for-net/ The transition (yep, also from ESRI) plan: http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/03/07/getting-ready-for-the-new-net-sdk/ A couple of weeks ago, the WPF SDK was deprecated: Note that version 10....


3

I think this blog post on the Esri site is still applicable: ArcObjects or the ArcGIS Runtime SDKs for Java and WPF—which is right for you? Though this question discusses the Java flavors, it may help as well.


3

You can't open an .mxd file directly in the WPF runtime map control. However, you don't necessarily need ArcGIS Server to get it to work. Instead you can publish the map and associated data as a map package. You can create a map package with ArcMap. Then you will need to add a layer in your .xaml file for each layer in the .mxd file. Additionally, you may ...


3

Correct. You can run Geoprocessing tools. You can write your own Geoprocessing tools in Python, create Geoprocessing packages, and run them in Runtime. Runtime comes with what we call "mini Python" at Esri, which is derived from the stock python.org Python for Windows install but reconfigured a bit so it doesn't require any set registry keys or ...


3

Assuming a 2d planar surface (since these are projected coordinates). Where n is the number of points.... For the case where n < 5, they always define an ellipse. For any four points, you can construct an ellipse that goes through all four points. In fact, there can be multiple ellipses which go through all four points. For n = 5, you can use the ...


3

I had a project where I needed to classify geometries as circles, ellipses, or irregular polygons. I found that after locating the center of the figure, I could easily classify two coordinates as "closest" and "farthest" point to that center, which then would allow me to derive a possible orientation of the ellipse, and its semi-major and semi-minor axis. ...


3

I finally figured out this issue after struggling forever. So I will let those who also may be having problems know what I did to find my problem. 1.) Do not assign a different symbol to the graphic. Just let it use the graphic that is associated with the feature layer. This will happen automatically without any additional code. 2.) Do not assign the shape ...


3

How to create a map package - ArcGIS Runtime SDK for WPF Help Or did you mean programmatically? As @KHibma points out, map packages can only be created from Desktop, arcpy or ArcObjects, not the WPF Runtime.


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An MPK is a Map Package, created in ArcMap. A MPKX can be created in ArcGIS Pro. They're basically the same thing, with the exception that a MPKX cannot be read by ArcMap, where the MPK can be read in ArcGIS Pro. An MMPK is a Mobile Map Package, and can only be created in ArcGIS Pro. It can be read back into ArcGIS Pro. The Map Package and Mobile Map ...


2

I tested your code. Inside of MakeSimpleSymbol method, if you are going to use LineSymbol, then you need to use with Polyline instead of Polygon. But I'm not sure why it correctly work if the UseAcceleratedDisplay is True. Here is code, private void MakeSimpleSymbol() { //Create a simple line symbol SimpleLineSymbol sls = new SimpleLineSymbol(); ...


2

As it turned out, the gpk was executing and producing a result, but the result was just not being written out to file geodatabase indicated in the model. I was able to solve this problem by manipulating the object ESRI.ArcGIS.Client.Tasks.GPFeatureRecordSetLayer once the gpk was finished executing. Here is the code . . . public ESRI.ArcGIS.Client.Tasks....


2

It appears ESRI has been retiring their old free geocoding services, such as the one at http://tasks.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services/Locators/TA_Streets_US/GeocodeServer, as described if you visit that URL in a browser. I've found them to be up one minute, down the next, more often the latter as time goes on in the past week. Anyway, the new ones are ...


2

Great answers above, but just wanted to add my voice to the choir :) ArcObjects has some (specialized) functionality that the ArcGIS Runtime SDKs don't provide: complex features, geometric networks, topology, annotation classes, etc. is designed for desktop deployments has a LARGE footprint (file size and memory) is based on COM technology and is ...


2

I had this same problem adding features, the geometry went in but no attributes. I fixed it for my code by adding the OutFields to the ServiceFeatureTable in the xaml file: <esri:ServiceFeatureTable ServiceUri="http://..." OutFields="USER_NAME,EXTRACTION_ID"/> </esri:FeatureLayer.FeatureTable> Works fine now. ...


2

From ArcGIS Runtime SDK for .Net - System requirements Supported .NET frameworks 4.6 4.5.2 Supported IDEs Visual Studio 2015 (all editions) Visual Studio Express 2015 for Windows Desktop Visual Studio 2013 (all editions) Visual Studio Express 2013 for Windows Desktop Visual Studio 2012 + Update 3 (all editions) Visual ...


2

Clicking with the Identify tool (Tools toolbar) on an elevation raster should return the elevation value at that point. I have only used DTEDs as output, but I believe they work the same as DEMs/elevation rasters. Since DTEDs come in different resolutions, you could get an interpolated elevation for a small area, rather than a 1-meter or submeter value that ...


1

As it turns out. The solution was pretty simple. Each ArcGISDynamicMapServiceLayer has a "Opacity" property that we bind to a slider and now we can control the whole ArcGISDynamicMapServiceLayer transparency instead of just the individual layers.


1

Well, This link can help, is ArcGIS JS page, it had info and examples. Some of the examples could be nice for your interest.


1

I found why. While in the old API the previous code works, here you have to add data attributes to your layers as indicate in the "Render graphics layer" example of the documentation in this page: https://developers.arcgis.com/net/desktop/guide/add-graphics-and-text.htm In order to do that Define a UniqueValueRenderer for a GraphicsLayer using code, ...


1

Both of the options that you are evaluating are good solutions, we already have been working in something very similar application, and we choose ArcGIS runtime for WPF about a year ago, right now we are thinking to migrate to ArcGIS runtime .NET.


1

Take into account that if you reference the database when you create the MPK, if you change the data in the database it will change. In other hand, if you choose to attach the database to the MPK, a new version of the database will be created. An MPK file is a zipped file that contains the mxd file and the geodatabase, if you attached the data. When ArcGIS ...


1

private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { int i = myMap.Layers.Count; ArcGISDynamicMapServiceLayer dynLayer = myMap.Layers[0] as ArcGISDynamicMapServiceLayer; List<string> plist = new List<string>(); foreach(LayerInfo layerinfo in dynLayer.Layers) { ...


1

According the documentation of ESRI, there is no way to select which buttons should appear, furthermore they states "If you do not use the Editor Widget, you need to code your own editing experience." I was digging in the technical documentation for that control....and I couldn't find a way to do it. :( New information: According to a blog from may 20 of ...


1

I figured it out. I changed my project to use .NET Framework 4.5.1 instead of 4.5 (not sure if this helped or not) and added the following to my App.config file: <configuration> <runtime> <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"> <dependentAssembly> <publisherPolicy apply="no" /> <...


1

Have a look at the linear referencing tool. First, you "creates routes" from your streets in order to have "M aware" polylines Second, you locate your points along the route in order to extract the M value Third, you iterate as mentioned by @dklassen EDIT : With the offset direction, you can see on which side of the route you are located. M_DIRECTION —...


1

It turns out this problem was in an ESRI.ArcGIS.Client.ElementLayer in the map which has an attached property for its envelope. If a negatively sized envelope gets passed up through to the layer, it is unhandled in ESRI's API. Inserting a check like below gets around the issue: Envelope arcGISEnvelope = new Envelope() { XMin = topLeftMap.X, ...


1

Instead of using DisplayMemberPath property try using ItemTemplate. You can access to Attributes collection with binding to {Binding Attributes[AttributeName]} in the ItemTemplate. <DataTemplate x:Key="MyDataTemplate"> <TextBlock Text="{Binding Attributes[Title]}"/> </DataTemplate> <ComboBox DataContext="{StaticResource ...


1

I ended up using the ArcGISLocalFeatureLayer object to accomplish what I was trying to do, which was to write the resulting feature class that was created from running the gpk to a geodatabase location of my choosing. I had to grab the GPFeatureRecordSetLayer when the gpk was completed, and use that result to populate the feature class using the Local ...


1

I posted to this at Esri's forums some ideas to this but to be short here is my approach for databinding issue since in real apps I don't define ViewModels as static resources in Views (usually my ViewModels are injected to Views by DI container + framework combination). Use DataContextProxy for Wpf like described at http://kajanus.net/?p=15 (WinRT/SL ...


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