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1

Try this model, to clip the base raster to the rotated fishnet you need to be using the Clip Raster tool and ensure clipping geometry is ticked on. The Clipped raster needs to be a TIF or the format of your base raster, it is the Copy Raster tool that is capable of converting the output into a jpeg. The final results in my test run did not look too great, I ...


0

As far as I know there are no perfect solution for this. I have tried these three different way, none are perfect. Go from multipart to single part and give each part it's own route ID (You may create your route ID like ROUTE-1_PART-A, ROUTE-1_PART-B, ..., ROUTE-1_PART-C it will allow you to select all route belonging to the same previous multipart line). ...


1

A quick Google search found this Esri documentation: Adding a table to a layout From the description on the page: When creating a layout, you can display attribute tables on it to help describe the features your map shows. The appearance of the table in the Table window defines how it will look on the layout. Thus, you'll want to set the text font and size ...


1

ArcMap does not support blending modes. This is a feature found in ArcPro starting with version 2.7. ArcPro Release Notes: https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/2.7/get-started/whats-new-in-arcgis-pro.htm#GUID-2F3B2C01-76F7-4AE5-B897-5E859EACBA4D


0

Try something like this. It is untested so backup your data first: import arcpy ABC_WATERLINE_COPY = "somelayer" fieldlist = ["NUMBEROFPLANTS","numberofsomethingelse","field3"] #Add all your fieldnames, they have to be the same in both tables, or the code will have to be modified list1 = ["ABC_WATERLINE_COPY.{}&...


2

So the SpatialFilter isn't quite right here. Yes, it merges information, but only 1 piece, because it's only trying to determine whether a feature overlaps. It's a yes/no result really. For example, I have parks and cycle paths and want to identify which paths pass through a park: This works fine. I know that 19 of 39 paths pass through a park. FME only ...


0

I could solve it with summarize lengths within converted raster cells to polygons. By spatial join and the rule "within polygons" I could summarize the lengths. Before I had to split the lines by polygon borders I created with a fishnet.


0

In ArcGIS Pro, you can directly use the tool Summarize Within or Spatial Join in Geoprocessing.


1

Grouping of roads is very complicated task. Optimal solution will take ages to achieve. I tried the idea explained in this answer to Grouping village points based on distance and population size using ArcMap on a set of roads totaling 368 km in length and attempted to split it into 5 'equal length' parts. Picture shows result: As one can see results are ...


2

As you have tagged your question as ArcMap and you are seeking a ModelBuilder solution; the easiest solution is to chain 20 Field Calculate tools as shown below, each one calculating on a different field. If you feel that this makes your model too long to look at then try embedding the chain of Calculate Field tools model into a master model? A more complex ...


0

If you convert your network into a geometric network you can use the find loop solver. You can create a selection from the loops and export these into another dataset.


-1

For ArcGIS Pro, the Flow Direction Raster input must be created as D8, not DINF type. Then the Flow Length will be the highest raster value in the same units as the original flow direction raster. If a DINF flow dir raster is provided, the flow length tool will not work properly, although it will create an erroneous output raster.


0

I found the answer to use the same logic used with collect values in sub model. I added another collect value in main model and connect it to output from sub model. This way, all feature classes in every dataset will be collected in this list. Now, use this model as sub model.


0

It is done in ArcMap by setting a reference scale property on a Data Frame which is more or less the same way it is done in ArcGIS Pro except in the latter it is set as a Map property. For ArcMap see Working with data frame reference scales. For ArcGIS Pro see Map reference scales.


0

Make a backup of your shapefile and run the recalculate feature extent tool on that shapefile. Or right click the shapefile from the catalog pane > properties > Feature Extent Tab > recalculate the feature extent. Do you get different/updated values now and does this fix the issue?


0

You need to force all labels to show up using the 'Never Remove (place overlapping) option: https://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/latest/map/working-with-text/forcing-the-placement-of-all-labels-in-a-label-class.htm


0

There are two main options. If you are adding new layers to the project, you must indicate the software to display the labels. To do so, right click on the layer > Properties > Labels tab > Check the 'Label features in this layer'option > Select and configure the field you want to display > Accept or Apply Could be related to labels conflict. ...


0

The refreshing of a linked Word document does not automatically happen as you have discovered and stated in the KB document. Amazingly this was reported in 2016 and ESRI have still (and I guess highly unlikely) not fixed it. But all it not lost! I experimented with some code, running it in the Python console in Arcmap and I managed to get the layout linked ...


1

If you read the help file for graduated symbols the first paragraph under the discussion section states there is no mechanism for changing a symbol in ArcMap, you need to apply an existing symbology to the entire layer, you cannot drill down to a single symbol and tweak it. As suggested by @MichaelStimson use the apply symbology tool.


0

As commented by @Hornbydd: You cannot remove that button. Just accept it is there and provide decent parameter help through it's item description to guide the user.


0

You can do it easily by polygonizing the aspect raster, and then calculate $Area into a new field via field calculator. This is the whole workflow.


0

You can use arcpy to update your ref field with sorted characters: import arcpy fc = r'C:\folder\shape123.shp' #Change ref_field = r'somefieldname' #Change with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(fc, ref_field) as cursor: for row in cursor: row[0] = ''.join(sorted(row[0]) #Update ref_field with sorted characters, for example '131/292' will become '/112239' ...


-1

As others point out, you can't use 'or' like that, since a string will almost always be True. What you likely want is something like this: Notice the initialysation of var, so it don't carry any old value, in case non of the criteria are fullfilled. def reclass(siteclass, tempzone, rainzone): val = 'Undefined...' if 'ST' in siteclass: # and if '...


2

Try Zonal Statistics as Table. Use your property shapefile as the input zone field, and your elevation layer as the input raster. The output will be a table with raster statistics (mean, min, max, etc.) for each input zone (i.e. ID in your shapefile). This table can then be joined back to your shapefile as additional attributes if that's useful.


3

You are close. I believe you just need to return your desired text string. And make sure argument names match your variable names (if mean temperature and temperature are different columns, be sure to include them as separate arguments) def Reclass(temperature, altitude, precipitation): if temperature >= 18 and altitude < 650 and precipitation >=...


1

The syntax should be: def wType(SWPULP, HWPULP): if SWPULP>=75: return "SP" elif HWPULP>=75: return "HP" else: return "MW" Call with: wType(!SWPULP!, !HWPULP!)


2

I think you are mixing SQL, VB and python syntax. Use python parser and: Pre-Logic: def reclass(siteclass): if 'ST' in siteclass: val = "Optimal" elif 'WT' in siteclass: val = "SubSuitable" else: val = "Unsuitable" return val Call with MACSITE_CL= reclass(!SITE_CLASS!)


1

I ended up using WebClient. // http://csharpexamples.com/download-files-synchronous-asynchronous-url-c/ using (WebClient webClient = new WebClient()) { webClient.DownloadFile(remotePath, localPath); }


0

The issue was solved by toggling on "Reduce Font Size" and then setting lower limit to 2 and step to 1.


0

We cannot unlock a password-protected Model Builder without the original password. https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/latest/arcpy/geoprocessing_and_python/encrypting-python-toolboxes.htm


0

To make select attribute by iterator value you must wright by this is way: lock v is capital.


0

You can do that by: 1- you can use Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to create Contour lines: Download DEM for your study region from USGS website. 2- Open ArcGIS, and Add DEM you have Download. You can Extract your region from DEM by using Extract by Mask tool, if you have Polygon Layer of your region. 3- Create Contour for your Extracted DEM, By using ...


0

Use the "Collect Events" tool. The output feature class or shapefile will have a column called "ICOUNT" which is the number of points at each location from the input points. ICOUNT = 1 is 1 point, ICOUNT = 2 is 2 points, etc.


2

You can use cursors like this: import arcpy fc = r'C:\folder\data.gdb\featureclass' #Change to your data source fields = ['AREA','SUM','Ratio'] totsum = sum([row[0] for row in arcpy.da.SearchCursor(fc, fields[0])]) #List all values in area field and sum them #Update/calculate sum and ratio fields with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(fc, fields) as cursor: for ...


2

Dissolve with Lat and Long as Dissolve Fields and number field (SUM) as statistics:


0

Seems like a BUG, but you can try to save the symbology as a layer file in ArcMap and import it in Pro, also check this https://community.esri.com/t5/arcgis-pro-ideas/arcgis-pro-quot-export-map-styles-quot-for-bulk/idi-p/937605.


2

List all object ids, then iterate over these and select: import arcpy fc = r'C:\data.gdb\featureclass' arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management(in_features=fc, out_layer='lyr') oids = [oid[0] for oid in arcpy.da.SearchCursor(fc,'OID@')] oidfield = arcpy.Describe(fc).OIDFieldName() def chunker(seq, size): return (seq[pos:pos + size] for pos in range(0, len(...


3

The python range function lets you choose a step size: >>> list(range(1,10001,1000)) [1, 1001, 2001, 3001, 4001, 5001, 6001, 7001, 8001, 9001] So loop over that and select attributes from N to N+1000: for N in range(1, NMAX, 1000): clear_selection() for I in range(1000): select_attribute(N+I) # now we've got 1000 selected features ...


1

If you already know python, you should have no problem doing it with arcpy.da.SearchCursor() and csv.writer(). Something like this: import csv w1 = open('C:/path/to/output.csv', 'w') w2 = csv.writer(w1) with arcpy.da.SearchCursor('your_layer_name', ['LIST', 'OF', 'FIELDS', 'TO', 'OUTPUT']) as c: w2.writerow(c.fields) # Write header row for row in c: ...


1

Copy Rows: Writes the rows from an input table, table view, feature class, or feature layer to a new table. If a selection is defined on a feature class or feature layer in ArcMap, only the selected rows are copied out. Just specify the output filename something.csv


0

I'd create 6 polygons (multiparts - Ok), and populate field by required No of points, pro-rata their areas. From that generate random points, using above field as required points count per polygon. Picture shows 6 such polygons and 50 random points. Polygons labelled by No of points required:


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