16

1) For a full 3D GIS, the better is GRASS GIS, look at Screenshots of 3D data management or From drone-aerial pictures to DEM and ORTHOPHOTO: the case of Caldonazzo's castle, from example. Some examples (interactive: you can scale, rotate the representation and many other things) : DEM with 3D points: Draped raster on the DEM Draped geological map with ...


6

There is no Layout View in ArcScene. You can export your scene to JPG by using File > Export Scene > 2D... and selecting JPEG in the Save As Type drop-down of the Export Map dialog.


5

Take a look into QGIS Plugins for that purpose. qgis2threejs is a experimental python plugin that is getting better and better as we speak. It allows you to transform any internet browser with WebGL into a 3D visualization tool. You can check the code here: https://github.com/minorua/Qgis2threejs Also check this usage example done by Anita Graser: http://...


5

You can also use ViziCities (in the browser using OpenStreetMap, WebGL and JavaScript), though it only supports 3D buildings and geographic features right now (data layers coming soon). Disclaimer: I'm the developer behind ViziCities, though my only intention is to let you know about it and let you decide which tool is best for you.


5

Unfortunately, ArcScene has not been opened up to ArcPy like ArcMap has. There is an ArcGIS Idea to have this functionality added to which you might like to add your name. Alternatively, keep an eye on ArcGIS Pro because its ArcPy has a Camera class designed for 3D: The Camera object provides access to 2D and 3D viewer properties that control the ...


5

That's ArcScene, not ArcMap, and as such has no real labelling abilities. However there are plugins. See this plugin for one potential solution: http://edndoc.esri.com/arcobjects/9.0/Samples/3D_Analyst/Visualization/ArcScene/Text_Toolbar/LABEL_3D_TOOLBAR.htm and https://geonet.esri.com/thread/96511 And also this answer: How to easily label point values in ...


5

Turn on the 3D Graphics toolbar, adjust some of the default text graphics properties before you add a label so that it is added large enough to see/find. Select the 3D Text tool Use the 3D Text tool to click on the feature you want to label, and type in the label you wish to display. Adjust the label properties for orientation and size. I've created a ...


4

Try to convert polygons to lines.


4

The easiest way I know to do this is to digitize a path around the object in question in ArcScene (make sure your polyline contains z-values), then select this path and use the animations toolbar to create a flyby from path. When you do this, you should have your screen centered on the object you want to focus on. Right click on the object and select "Set ...


4

Perhaps one of these two methods will work for you: ArcMAP Select by Location 3D relationships and ArcScene Select by 3D Box How about Inside 3D (3D Analyst)? Since the output of Extrude Between is a feature class with multipatch 3D features, can you use this tool to identify the 3D Point features which are within the resulting soil horizons? Can you use ...


4

A DEM is simply a grid of values representing elevation. To visualize the elevation in "3D" in ArcScene, right-click the DEM layer and go to properties. Under the Base Heights tab, select the "Floating on a custom surface" radio button, and navigate to your DEM if it is not already populated in the browse box. Hit Apply and OK. ArcScene will render the ...


4

The workflow to get this: Elevation of original buffer = 100m. I defined plateau elevation = 150 m, and computed D=50/tan(35). D=71.40 m. Next - create negative buffer "outside only" with minus 71.40 m. Converted inner ring to polyline and populated new field Z=150. Convert original buffer to polyline and populate new field by 100. Used 2 polylines and ...


4

I've found a useful work around right now that works in FME As a reader select your .shp file from ArcGIS Pro. First you need to transform the shape to an 3D generated environment (important to select the base_elev of your shape (as surface level)) The second transformer extrudes the polygons by their approx_hei (the z-value in meters in your attribute ...


4

What you could is to create a Mosaic Dataset. Here the singles tiles are converted into one large tile which shows continous displaying. Here is the reference for the tool on the ESRI website: http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/tools/data-management-toolbox/create-mosaic-dataset.htm I can't give you any screenshots because ArcGIS is not ...


3

I would use this approach: Add flood deep to DTM to create a new surface raster (use Plus (3D Analyst) tool). Drape the flood raster to the new surface.


3

The link in Devdatta's comment partially addresses how to simply drape the vectors, but despite this you can still experience the issues the OP mentions. I believe (personal hypothesis) that the mismatch is due to the difference in triangulation between your vectors and the underlying TIN. You notice this especially with large polygons where the ...


3

My suggestion would be to create two rasters, one from the first returns to create a Digital Surface Model (DSM). Then create a "bare earth" DEM using the last returns. Next, create a normalized DSM (nDSM) by subtracting the DEM from the DSM which will give relative heights above an assumed baseline of "0". From there, you can extract the values of the ...


3

I had the same problem using some SRTM DEMs. Besides from using some later and more correct version or another data source, I'd recommend setting all values below some chosen threshold (that will only select the hole pixels) to NoData (=erase them) and then re-interpolating them according to the surrounding pixels so that there will at least be no excesses.


3

I also encountered this problem (shadows appearing below the ground) and it took me a while to figure out a workaround (I suspect that the problem exists because the tools are not yet used very much - I had to figure this out on my own!) You basically need to select only the above ground shadows and delete the rest. My (not very eloquent) workaround was ...


3

GIS wont be a big drain on your graphics card. You might not want to hear this, but even an Intel integrated graphics chip will do fine. I definitely wouldn't go for a workstation graphics card, they are used for precision, not performance, and are way too expensive. If I were you, I'd get something nice and light so that you can carry it around for school ...


3

A quick search uncovered Make your first scene in the ArcGIS Online Help: A scene is symbolized 3D geospatial content that includes a multiscale basemap, a collection of 2D and 3D layers, styles, and configurations that allow you to visualize and analyze geographic information in an intuitive and interactive 3D environment.You can create scenes with ...


3

In ArcMap use the Identify tool and point at cells (pixels) in the raster. It should give you 2 or more values, among them "Stretched" and "Pixel value". Stretched is the colour/brightness, and changes according to Symbology settings. Pixel value is the raw value, and in the case of a DEM will be your Elevation or Z value. Use an area well above sea level ...


3

INPUTS: PROCESS: Join summary table to S_JOIN using line id Select not shared walls using "SUM_ST.FIRST_BLDI" = "SUM_ST.LAST_BLDID" Remove join and export selection to new dataset called NOT_SHARED. Switch selection and export it to SHARED Join summary table to SHARED, select walls that are higher than neighbour: Calculate H using: [SHARED.H] - [...


3

Go to the Layer Properties of your Geomorphogical_FPA layer, Base Heights tab. Click the radio button 'Floating on custom surface'. Choose your DEM as the surface to drape the classified image on top of. You can also improve the display quality by adjusting the Quality enhancement for raster images on the Rendering tab. Steps: Resulting reclassified raster ...


2

I just had the same problem as you but had a different solution. In scene properties I changed the "Vertical Exaggeration" to "Geographic" (i know the question was asked a while ago but this offers another explanation. (Im using Arc Scene 10.1)


2

I used to export 3D scenes a lot from ArcScene and I usually found the ArcScene did a pretty good job of creating the VRML. However, I would sometimes encounter similar problems with one viewer but not in another one, depending on how strictly the programmers had implemented the VRML specification for a given viewer. The problem will most likely lie not ...


2

It is amazing tool, it works in ArcScene 10.2 just follow this link (or this archived link).


2

You should rather clean or smooth the source point data than generate a TIN or raster and try to clean later. Using ArcGIS Note that LAS data handling has greatly improved in ArcGIS 10.2. If 10.2 (with 3D Analyst) is available to you, try the build-in functions: There is a tool called Locate Outliers (part of 3D Analyst) which works perfectly for removing ...


2

Here a simple python snippet showing how to do it. #!/usr/bin/python import math # ----------------------------------------------------------- # Python snippet to calculate a stepped vertex vector # ----------------------------------------------------------- # A Vertex class with the distance calculation # ---------------------------------------------------...


2

You need to use the DTM as the base height for your flood depth raster and calculate a new height by adding the flood depths raster value to the dtm base height as a vertical offset. bearing in mind that water is flat (waves aside), you could also use a flat plane and calculate the flood limits as a height above sea level and set the height of the plane ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible