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Try using the Append geoprocessing tool. That way you can map the fields which are relevant to the data you really need. Another way is to try the Load Objects tool which you can find in the customized mode.


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If you don't want to use code you could use the field calculator with selections or definition query. Open the table Select by attribute/definition query where Field1 IS NOT NULL Field calculate field desiredresult = Field1 Clear you selection query/definition query Add a new selection/definition query where Field2 IS NOT NULL Field calculate field ...


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Use Calculate Field / Field Calculator with python parser to calculate a third field: !fieldA! + !fieldB!


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You could try the aggregate function to get the value of WayPoint where the object in point-layer intersects the start_point (and end_point) of the digitised line. This might work better than trying to compare the WKTs: aggregate(layer:='point-layer', aggregate:='max', expression:="WayPoint", filter:= intersects( $geometry, start_point(geometry(@...


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If you look at the second box of your first picture (file encoding) you'll see that your encoding is set to UTF-32BE if you didn't set it that way on purpose (because you need to use this specific encoding) that's probably what is causing your problem, try to set it to UTF-8 or system and try again


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Slight variation of 2 other solutions. Use Near tool (location) on your points and buffer. Calculate Shape field using calculator (Python): arcpy.Point( !NEAR_X!, !NEAR_Y!) Note: this will modify original shapes, so create a copy first. Difference with Snap tool - you don't need to guess distance, and generate near table looks like unnecessary complication....


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It depends on what you mean by "view" and "as a database". To simply extract the data from a table into a data structure in Python using Arcpy, use arcpy.da.SearchCursor(). See: https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/arcpy/data-access/searchcursor-class.htm If this answer is too vague, that's probably because you're question is a little on the vague side, and ...


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You can use "generate near table" and then recalculate the geometry to move them. test this on a copy of your data as I'm typing this process from memory right now With Generate Near Table: "input feature" is your points. "Near feature" is a 5 foot buffer of your lines (alternatively you could use copy parallel to create new lines that are 5 feet on either ...


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You'll need a Standard or higher license for this method. Create a buffer feature class from your centerlines with a 5 foot buffer distance. Then use the Snap tool. Your points are your input features. Your centerline buffers are your snap features. Use Edge as your type.


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Either of these should work. See notes below for further explanation. concat( "PlotL", to_string("PlotC") ) or "PlotL" || to_string("PlotC") Notes: to_string converts a number into a string Double quotation marks around field names are optional, but still a good idea, especially if: your field names have spaces your field name may be confused by the ...


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This is building on the accepted answer by Joseph but I don't have a enough reputation to comment on that. Anyone else searching for this may find the following useful to open an attribute table and then set its filter mode without needing to change the QSettings: attDialog=iface.showAttributeTable(iface.activeLayer()) #Or specify a QgsVectorLayer ...


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You can use aggregate to summarise the table then merge the results back to the attribute table. If you've read in 'd' using the sf package (or rgdal, though I haven't tested that): agg <- aggregate(formula = Height ~ Location.ID, data = d, FUN = mean) d <- merge(d, agg, by = "Location.ID")


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In QGIS 3.x a common error source is to choose the wrong decimal separator. Check or Uncheck the box "Decimal separator is comma" before loading your CSV into QGIS:


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I changed the method finally; I found out that relational databases are not the most adequate and appropriate solution on ArcGIS (in my case at least). I created a large table combining the data of all my previous tables (with arcpy.Merge_management()) and added the dates with the arcpy.AddField_management(). It's much easier and it's feasible in one python ...


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Another solution via using regexp_match() and trim() Since the match has to be checked both ways means the regexp_match() has to be applied twice using the conjunction AND to achieve the exact match. regexp_match(trim("DN"), trim("DN_2")) AND regexp_match(trim("DN_2"), trim("DN")) A Λ B is true only if A is true and B is true regexp_match(input_string, ...


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Tested on QGIS 2.18 and QGIS 3.4 I can suggest using a "Virtual Layer" through Layer > Add Layer > Add/Edit Virtual Layer... Let's assume we have 10 features in "layer" accordingly, where each feature has a unique "Name" and mutual "Group" attributes, see image below. With the following Query, it is possible to achieve the result SELECT l.geometry, ...


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You can achieve this using the DB Manager of QGIS. You choose Database / Database Manager / Database Manager then Virtual Layers / Qgis Layers you can then try queries like the following : select area, max(st_area(geometry)) from your_layer_name group by area_id You have to adapt the attribute's name according to your data structure... You can then load ...


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Go to the Layer Properties and the Symbology tab Depending on the layer type just select a simple fill, or a simple line instead of a categorized symbol. Next to the "Fill color" or "Stroke color" whatever you are wanting colored, and there is a drop down select next to it. Select Edit... from the drop down which will bring up the Expression String Builder ...


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