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23

There are 13 multi-state US Census' ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs): 02861, 42223, 59221, 63673, 71749, 73949, 81137, 84536, 86044, 86515, 88063, 89439 & 97635. As others have mentioned, there are a few different ways to figure out the area covered by a ZIP Code, but ZCTAs are the easiest, and the only official version that I know of. So your ...


15

Yes you can. Go to 'layer properties' > 'labels' Under 'placement' choose 'Using perimeter'


13

Option 1 - Quickest way There is actually a quite immediate way to obtain that effect: double click on the layer you want to style (in your case the border layer) under Symbology select Hashed line play around with the settings. To obtain something similar to the example of the question, set Rotation to 45° (or -45°) Option 2 - Quick way Always through a ...


11

There really isn't a way to tell this; since there is not a ZipCode boundary shape that is defined by the USPS. ZipCodes are defined by a bounding box of Streets delivered to by carriers from a particular distribution center. So you would need to take the USPS AIS data and extract by ZipCodes the streets that are delivered by a given Post Office, then Join ...


11

You can download free state border layers of Germany from DIVA-GIS by selecting Administrative areas as the subject.


10

There are TWO "right hand rules" (well, scores, if not hundreds, but the direction of magnetic force induced on a positive charge isn't relevant to this discussion). One asserts that vertices be ordered in rings so that, if you walked the perimeter, with one hand within the figure, and one hand outside, that the right hand be inside: the exterior ring is ...


8

The boundary=maritime OpenStreetMap Wiki page might help. Basically, solid lines show the territorial waters as you guessed (12 nautical miles except between states). A good way to check the nature of an object (line, point,...) in OpenStreetMap is to open the map editor (I think you have to register yourself) and select the object. Lots of information will ...


7

The US Census Bureau derives approximate boundaries for ZIP codes based on the addresses contained within them, called ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs). They publish relationship files that describe how their ZCTAs map to various other geographies. If you examine the ZCTA to Place relationship file you can see how they map to cities and towns. You can ...


7

You can download the scene boundaries here; http://landsat.usgs.gov/tools_wrs-2_shapefile.php You could use these as they are or generate an "inside" buffer shapefile to ensure that you trim all bad data in all bands. Create a separate file for each scene (use split by attributes tool if there are many images to be processed). Then clip the rasters (CLIP ...


7

ArcMap won't do that for a single layer - transparency is handled for the entire symbology as a unit, not in pieces. So, the solution is to just have two copies of the layer in your table of contents. One with the outline and no fill, the other with no outline and a colored fill with whatever transparency you are looking for. Just make sure the layer with ...


6

This may be what you're looking for: http://library.thinkquest.org/C006628/GIS.html


6

Use Intersect tool by setting output_type to "Line". The result will be edges of all input (polygon) layer. Just calculate the length of the output(line) and that is it.


6

You could create the border as a line then buffer the line the right distance (it will depend of your map scale) to get a polygon and style this polygon with a line pattern fill and no border. To create the buffer you may use the tool from the processing toolbox (create a new polygon layer) or use the geometry generator in the border line style (better if ...


5

Unless you have a particular reason for using the boundary commissions, you can get national boundaries from the downloads at Natural Earth (this includes contested areas - if there are any in your area of interest). Go to the link, look under "Large Scale" and then "Cultural" for the files you will need.


5

I have just been trying to find these historical GIS datasets from ThinkQuest Library I was looking for, but this time I was successful! I managed to find a backup of the file at GitHub, where the complete dataset can be downloaded.


5

At http://www.geodatenzentrum.de/ you will find boundarys from the local community up to the national border.


5

Open the symbology menu of your layer and choose outline marker line. Make sure to uncheck rotate marker. Then navigate to simple marker. Choose the line as symbol and rotate it by -45°. Do additional styles if you wish.


4

2016 TIGER Data with PostGIS As a special caveat, ZCTA data isn't USPS Zip Codes. It's an approximation of it. USPS Zip Codes are really horrible and not useful except to approximate. Everyone, including every governmental entity other than USPS, and (the Census for making ZCTA) ignores them entirely. If USPS wanted to a grow up a bit, they'd just convert ...


4

For a non linked answer, right click on the layer name and select Properties>Style tab and set the Fill style to No Brush and Outline width to a larger number, see image below:


4

Draw the outline using the same color as the fill color. Doing so will prevent gaps that can appear between the polygons.


4

Changing the outline colour is useful technique for previewing, but if you want to apply certain effects (like drop shadow, shapeburst fill) the results are applied separately to each polygon, which won't look too good. Also, on some older versions of QGIS, you can still see hairline gaps. Your best bet is to use Dissolve on your waterways layer. This will ...


4

A simple way would be to have your national borders in a separate file from your subnational borders. Here is an example if you use the most-detailed border datasets from Natural Earth Data (http://www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/10m-cultural-vectors/). I downloaded both the "Admin 0 - Countries" and "Admin 1- States/Provinces" datasets. They should ...


4

Split out the houses and the street features: > houses = example[example$CAD_TYPE1 == "Private Parcel",] > streets = example[example$CAD_TYPE1 == "Casement",] Compute the intersection of houses and streets, using byid to compute the intersection for each house for all the street lines: > frontages = gIntersection(houses, streets,byid=c(TRUE,FALSE)...


3

Approach #2 seems to be the more comfortable one. You should have a look at natural earth data for a shp ( www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/10m-cultural-vectors/10m-admin-0-countries/). Regarding the flight path I am not sure if it is always a straight line. You should consider that.


3

You have two options. One is to set the style of your polygons to 'categorised' based on the region. You will possibly want to set the border to 'no pen'. Alternatively dissolve your data based on the larger regions.


3

This page gives you border shapefiles of the whole world over the centuries: http://library.thinkquest.org/C006628/GIS.html UPDATE The services has been discontinued, see the answer from Joseph below. If you want more details, you might georeferenece and digitize some old maps from here: http://www.wildernis.eu/chart-room/ But don't expect too much ...


3

The manual way to do this is to use the official WRS-2 path/row scene boundaries Download the WRS-2 shape file from USGS’ Path/Row Shapefiles dedicated web-page Select the path/row tile of your interest and use it as a mask to clip border fringes (this might involve rasterising the vector tile) To answer, however, your question directly about an automatic ...


3

euroatlas has detailled shapefiles for europe 1900, unfortunately not free, but there is a free sample, so that you can check the quality of the data. infos and download of sample: http://shop.euratlas.com/maps_gis/gis_1900.html the IEG-maps offer good raster-maps free for personal use: e.g. europe 1914 http://www.ieg-maps.uni-mainz.de/mapsp/mappEu914Serie1....


3

You can work this out using the GeoNames RDF endpoint (and probably with other end points too). So for example to find the neighbours of France you call http://sws.geonames.org/3017382/neighbours.rdf which returns the following file: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?> <rdf:RDF xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" xmlns:...


3

If you click in each color symbol generated by color ramp you can choose your outline color for each symbol. Also, you can convert your polygons into lines and make a ramp color symbology for the lines and other symbology to the polygon with transparent outline.


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