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The following both commands should work with double quotes "" surrounding the file format "ESRI Shapefile" and with or without double quotes "" surrounding the files names: ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" "file.shp" "file.tab" Or ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" file.shp file.tab But using single quotes '' surrounding the file format 'ESRI Shapefile' will raise ...


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Don't change the CRS in the layer settings. If you already changed it, change it back to the original CRS. Once the layer is back in the correct, original CRS, you can add coordinates to the attribute table. Use the Field Calculator to add two new fields with these expressions: x(transform($geometry, 'EPSG:current', 'EPSG:target')) y(transform($geometry, '...


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I successfully converted the coordinates in your CSV after downloading it from your link using only ArcMap. (If you're using ArcGIS Pro, it should also work there, but the steps may be a little different.) Here's what worked for me when I tested with your data in ArcMap: Drag the CSV from the Catalog view into ArcMap's Table Of Contents Right click on the ...


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When converting from DD⁰ MM' SS", you must remember that S latitudes will become negative and that W longitudes will become negative. Simply multiply the converted lat and/or lon by -1.


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Not sure if you got this working but the easiest way is to use QGIS which is essentially a GUI for ogr2ogr. If you load in your .TAB file into QGIS you can right click in the layers panel and click Export > Save Features As.. From here you can select a number of formats to save as. Chris


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I'm doing the same thing, converting the GEBCO 2019.nc to an xyz for further processing. I'm using gdal via qgis tools, gdal2xyz. The interface is a little more intuitive vice command line. The conversion (elevation layer for z conversion) is Band 1. (default on my instance). The resulting .csv can be processed in any number of downstream tools


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