4

You can use QGIS and create a OSM query to achieve that. You need the plugin "QuickOSM" In QuickOSM You fill the fields as seen here: and your result is the boundary of the city Valencia :) it includes all available administrative levels. to get only the inner-city districts: right click the temporary polygon layer, make it editable and delete all non-...


3

If you happen to be using QGIS, this Plugin seems to do what you're asking for quite easily. https://github.com/sigdeletras/Spanish_Inspire_Catastral_Downloader


3

I used projfinder.com - put one of your X and Y coordinates in the coordinate boxes, zoom and centre the map to where the points should be, and hit "find my projection". I'm guessing your point should be on this road junction: There are three projections that are all about the same distance from that road junction and nothing closer, so the chances are its ...


2

I don't think there are practical limitations to ned2geodetic. The conversion from LLA to ECEF coordinates has closed form solution. The rotation of NED vector to ECEF has closed form solution. Vector addition in ECEF is trivial. Conversion of ECEF coordinates to LLA as implemented in Matlab is not closed form solution. However, the algorithm employed is ...


2

The approach you're looking for is called monoplotting in photogrammetry. If given your assumptions on camera orientation, you will need a digital elevation model (unless you also assume the ground is perfectly flat), and also the size of your camera's imaging sensor. I'll try here to describe a simplified version of this process. Given the position (I ...


1

Since you are dealing with point data, the results of both expressions of $x and x($geometry) are identical. Same applied to $y and y($geometry). I tested the behavior of both expressions on my point grid data and I found that both them produced the same results as you can see below: In the table above the coordinates in X and Y fields were calculated using ...


1

Solved by Mike Mike's solution here Thanks to @Mike to his help. I put the solution that Mike did in codesandbox (just in case, in a future may not be available) index.html <!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head> <title>Simple Map</title> <!-- The line below is only needed for old environments like Internet ...


1

You cannot get the extent from the center and number of pixels alone. These images all have the same center and number of pixels: You also need to know the resolution (the distance on the ground covered by each pixel) and the rotation (was the image taken with north at the top)


1

Correct CRS for these coordinates is EPSG:22287 (Cape / Lo27). Conversion from projected coordinates to EPSG:4326 (WGS 84) can be done at epsg.io: https://epsg.io/transform#s_srs=22287&t_srs=4326&x=58958.4440060&y=2491707.7922860 When converting, you have to swap X and Y. For example, for first coordinate A=Y59665 X2493871, when converting, it ...


1

Yes, it is. EPSG 4326 is the identifier for the World Geodetic System 84 (WGS84). If you check the Well Known Text (WKT) for WGS84 you will see it uses degrees as units: GEOGCS["WGS 84", DATUM["WGS_1984", SPHEROID["WGS 84",6378137,298.257223563, AUTHORITY["EPSG","7030"]], AUTHORITY["EPSG","6326"]], PRIMEM["Greenwich",0, ...


1

EPSG 4326 is a coordinate system. Its units are degrees of latitude and longitude. If you define the lat/long of a point, then you know where that point is. There's nothing wrong with using EPSG 4326 for locating points. You'll have accuracy problems if you try to calculate distance, area or angles in EPSG 4326, but that's not what you're doing. If you ...


1

Just so the answer is in here and not in the comments, I'm adding based on @TomazicM answer above Going to epsg.io (epsg.io) and searching for Lo29 gives you two most likely candidates: EPSG 2053 and EPSG 22289. First coordinate in your table is X and second Y. You have to add constant 2,700.000 to Y. See https://epsg.io/map#srs=2053&x=72058.999544&...


1

No, you cannot download the data from Google Maps. There is a wealth of data if you simply conduct a basic Google Search, but it is offered by a disparate array of national/regional/etc. entities for all locales. If you are looking for data related to Spain, look through the data offered by Centro de Descargas: http://centrodedescargas.cnig.es/...


1

Currently it does not seem to be supported in PROJ. With the latest version, I used the projinfo command: $ projinfo -s "WGS84" -t "epsg:5819" Candidate operations found: 1 ------------------------------------- Operation n°1: unknown id, Inverse of Null geographic offset from WGS 84 to WGS 84 + EPSG topocentric example A, 0 m, World PROJ string: Error ...


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