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7

You can do Layer... Save As... and choose the CSV output format. Choose Geometry type as POINT and Geometry as AS_XY: Then you'll get a CSV like: X,Y,route_fid,route_point_id,ele,time,magvar,geoidheight,name,cmt,desc,src,link1_href,link1_text,link1_type,link2_href,link2_text,link2_type,sym,type,fix,sat,hdop,vdop,pdop,ageofdgpsdata,dgpsid -2.57063249857404,...


6

So you want to geocode your file ("translate" adresses to xy coordinates). You can search by yourself using this "geocode" keywords and you'll find plenty information. However, in France, there is a free batch geocoder here : https://adresse.data.gouv.fr/csv If you use it, you'll obtain a csv with xy coordinates (ESPG:4326) for each of your adresses. ...


6

you can also use the field calculator to change the geometry directly for selected points or all points. see picture below (sorry it's the german version but it should be clear anyway):


6

The answer to this question is somewhat technical. First you need to recall that the Earth looks like this: So when it's drawn as a flat surface, there will be distortion. How much distortion depends on the projection. The Web Mercator map projection is famous (or, in some circles, notorious) for the infinite exaggeration at the poles (note that Greenland ...


5

You need to access the underlying QgsPoint object. Think of QgsGeometry as a "container" which holds a point, line, polygon, etc. To do this you call ".get()" on the QgsGeometry. I.e. geom.get().x() geom.get().z() geom.get().setZ(5) Etc


5

Assuming you do bounds on each geometry, you will have indeed a simplified rectangle on which you should do coordinates() to get a nested list of coordinates: // return the list of coordinates var listCoords = ee.Array.cat(bbox.coordinates(), 1); Casting it to an array makes it possible to slice out the x and y coordinates: // get the X-coordinates var ...


5

This is a bit of a workaround in QGIS 3.8 and requires that the points are separated by a uniform distance (bit it looks like it from your screenshots). Create a grid with the same spacing and dimensions as your points - somewhere in the vicinity with Processing Toolbox --> Create grid Next, enable the editing mode on the new Grid grid. Make sure that the ...


4

see picture below->Map Grid properties:


4

First you need the parliamentary borders, which you can download as a shapefile from http://geoportal.statistics.gov.uk/datasets/westminster-parliamentary-constituencies-december-2015-full-extent-boundaries-in-great-britain You can also get the data generalised or clipped to the coastline - search for "Westminster" seems to get most of the options: http:/...


4

No plugin, CAD digitalized or field calculator was necessary for me. Just put the table in edit mode, add a vector point to the map, then use the Node Tool. You can drag the point with it, or by clicking your point you can edit the coordinates. Good luck !


4

I have never tried this for such a huge amount of rasters; hope this works: GDALTileIndex (Raster > Miscellaneous > Tile Index) on your raster Centroids (Vector > Geometry Tools > Centroids) on the tile polygons (from Step 1) Add Geometry Attributes (Processing Toolbox > Vector geometry) on the centroids (from Step 2)


4

You can use QGIS and create a OSM query to achieve that. You need the plugin "QuickOSM" In QuickOSM You fill the fields as seen here: and your result is the boundary of the city Valencia :) it includes all available administrative levels. to get only the inner-city districts: right click the temporary polygon layer, make it editable and delete all non-...


4

It appears to be degrees and decimal minutes: 51329338= 51 degrees, 32.9338 minutes Then in decimal degrees latitude: 51 + 32.9338/60.0 =51.54889666666666 and longitude: -7.7573/60.0=-0.129288333333333


4

According to spatial reference.org, EPSG:3078 is a Hotine Oblique Mercator projection. The equations for converting between (E,N) and (lat,lon) using a Hotine Oblique Mercator projection may be found in the EPSG Geomatics Guidance Note 7 part 2.


4

You can check the coordinate transformation pipeline with the gdaltransform utility https://gdal.org/programs/gdaltransform.html#gdaltransform starting from GDAL version 3.0 that is using new Proj library version 6 or higher. Example gdaltransform -s_srs epsg:3078 -t_srs epsg:4326 --debug on 10 30 OGRCT: Selecting transformation +proj=pipeline +step +inv ...


4

Generate Voronoi Polygons around your points using Processing Toolbox - Vector Geometry-Voronoi Polygons. Use Vector - Geometry Tools - Extract Vertices to get the intersections of the newly created Voronoi Polygons. Creating Voronoi Polygons around the vertices. The resulting polygons will have your original points located at their intersections ...


3

Sounds like you need some Geocoding. There are several ways that I may refer you to. Using QGIS plugins, e.g. MMQGIS, GeoCoding, and others (check the list) There is even one especially for France, namely Gban (not sure if it is directly available in QGIS Plugins menu, perhaps you need to install it manually, related topics: How do I install a plugin when I ...


3

You need to know four sets of information in order to precisely locate a pixel from the image to the ground. 1) The position of the camera (three coordinates : X,Y,Z) 2) The angle of view of the camera (three angles: omega, phi, kappa) 3) The distance between the camera and the soil (or the scale of the picture) 4) the geometry of the camera (e.g. the ...


3

I had the same problem once, and writing the number without the dots solved it. Here the steps I used to solved the problem. I choose the "WGS 84 / Pseudo-Mercator" CRS. This values does not exist in the Mercator projection, I choose it because I have no data about regarding the right CRS. save the numbers without the dots in a "CSV UTF-8 (Comma delimited)...


3

I don't think there are practical limitations to ned2geodetic. The conversion from LLA to ECEF coordinates has closed form solution. The rotation of NED vector to ECEF has closed form solution. Vector addition in ECEF is trivial. Conversion of ECEF coordinates to LLA as implemented in Matlab is not closed form solution. However, the algorithm employed is ...


3

You are going to need to edit the coordinates to make them into Polygons. The easiest way is to open the file in excel (or open office) and adding a new string column where you concatenate "POLYGON((" to the start, then your coordinates replacing ';' with ',' and then add "))" on the end. So a formula something like: =CONCATENATE("POLYGON((",SUBSTITUTE(B2,"...


3

Standard linked by @user30184 ( portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=35326 ) explicitly and precisely defines ScaleDenominator. Scale of tiled map is 1:ScaleDenominator. Each pixel is assumed to be 0.28mm, which allows to calculate span of each tile in meters by multiplying TileWidth (or TileHeight) by ScaleDenominator * 0.00028. Knowing real-world ...


3

The vector layer needs to be included in the map and you will need to process information from your drawn lines somewhere, the drawend event would be the best place to do that. Views default to EPSG:3857 so you don't need to define it. var view = new ol.View({ center: [1030534,5690437], zoom: 12 }) var source = new ol.source.Vector(); var vector = ...


3

I assume you want to specify the coordinates of the point and have it move to specified coordinates if so the attributes table is not how you do it, instead use the Vertex tool - right click on the point and window should pop up where you can edit the coordinates.


3

Creating a grid is a trivial task in either QGIS or ArcGIS. The process is explained in detail the software manuals and many tutorials easily found through a quick internet search, so it would be redundant to repeat them here. Exporting to a file format "able to work with civil 3d 2016" is a separate question. The technical documentation for "civil 3d 2016"...


3

If you decide to use pyproj (an excellent recommendation from @mkennedy), here is a projection string that may work: +proj=eqdc +lat_0=43 +lat_1=42 +lat_2=44 +lon_0=-74 +datum=WGS84 +units=us-ft +no_defs Using this online converter, it gives a result close to your example. Input: +proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs Output: +proj=eqdc +lat_0=43 +lat_1=42 +...


3

That looks like a projected Coordinate System, with units in either feet or meters. You can figure out what coordinate system your points are in by trying out different coordinate conversions on this website. Enter the lat/long of a coordinate, choose the target CRS, and click convert. Try out different target CRS's until the conversion gives you the known ...


3

EDIT: I first thought that your squares were polygons. If they are lines, you need to convert the lines to polygons (vector > geometry tools > Lines to polygon) , then you can apply the method below (for polygons) In the attribute table, you can compute the X and Y coordinates of the centroid (=the point at the center of the grid square) using the field ...


3

QGIS has a tool called "Swap X and Y coordinates" that does exactly that: This algorithm swaps the X and Y coordinate values in input geometries. It can be used to repair geometries which have accidentally had their latitude and longitude values reversed.


3

I used projfinder.com - put one of your X and Y coordinates in the coordinate boxes, zoom and centre the map to where the points should be, and hit "find my projection". I'm guessing your point should be on this road junction: There are three projections that are all about the same distance from that road junction and nothing closer, so the chances are its ...


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