New answers tagged

3

If your points have unique IDs, which match between the CSV files, you may use join attributestable to add the coordinates from the first CSV to the second CSV twice. Then you can use make_line() to create the lines.


2

Does your "point" from the first CSV and "point A" "point B" from the second CSV could be used for joining the two table ? If so you should be able to join the table with coordinate to the second one. Do it two time, a first joint with "point A" and "point " to get lat A / lon A then join again but with &...


2

Test with gdaltranslate and Proj version Rel. 6.3.2, May 1st, 2020 gdaltransform -s_srs epsg:31468 -t_srs epsg:25832 4359995 5295525 584665.897718455 5292775.70405037 0 Test with Proj 7.2.0 gdaltransform -s_srs epsg:31468 -t_srs epsg:25832 4359995 5295525 584665.477180318 5292775.48134032 0 Your numbers look alike. Obviously newer Proj version gives ...


5

When you use "Extract Vertices" tool, it gives a clue for the directions. It adds vertex_index column. Then extract the vertices to CSV and set GEOMETRY = AS_XY


3

QgsLineString has a numPoints method and a pointN method so combining those in a for loop should do what you want. But it might be easiest to just use the points method to get a list of the points (I can't think of any reason they would not be in order along the line).


4

Solution 1 To solve the problem, right click your basemap layer and set CRS back to EPSG:3857 - the initial one and the only one valid. Do not change layer CRS: See here for details: https://gis.stackexchange.com/a/392388/88814 and https://gis.stackexchange.com/a/383437/88814. Solution 2 You can also get lat/lon (EPSG:4326) coordinates even if you have ...


1

Google map APIs use format for a point as (Latitude,Longitude) which is also exquallent to (Y,X) Openlayers APIs use the other way around like (Longitude, Latitude) or(X,Y) format. QGIS uses coordinates depending on your settings configured.


4

one simple solution would be to use Layeractions and log the clicked coordinates within the Log Messages from QGIS: Open the Properties of your OSM Street layer and go to the Actions tab Press Add Define a Python Action Enter the Code The Code fragment: QgsMessageLog.logMessage( "[% @click_x %] ,[% @click_y %]", tag='Coordinates', level=Qgis.Info)...


1

1. Assigning a (fake) Reference System Since this data are not a "real" projection, you can use any CRS (Coordinate Reference System) you want. I would suggest to assign any UTM, but it really does not make any difference. Doble click on the raster name in the Browser panel, and click on the Source tab, then select the desired CRS: 2. ...


0

In my breadth of knowledge, hopefully someone who knows more will correct me if I'm wrong, there is not a built-in way to achieve what you're talking about in QGIS. However, If you have the pre-requisite knowledge (Or about 2 weeks of spare time xD), I know you could write a script, I would use Python, that would import the data to QGIS for you. Considering ...


2

Technically, you could save the GPS reported precision in an attribute, convert it from m to degrees using 111km per degree latitude (and multiplying by cos(latitude) for longitude). Then you could use the log10 function to convert the error to number of significant digits and finally round or format_number to display the GPS coordinates suitably rounded. ...


1

If you've still got the original transformation saved in the georeferencer then this approach might work: Create a raster with the same number of pixel rows and columns as your PNG. Make it with two layers, where one layer is just the pixel row number, and the other is the pixel column number. When viewed, one layer will be horizontal stripes, the other ...


Top 50 recent answers are included