New answers tagged

1

The geotiff spec on geotiff.maptools.org states if you want to display a PixelIsPoint raster, the origin is shifted to (-0.5, -0.5). The "point" remains at (0,0), it is just displayed as the centre of the pixel. If a point-pixel image were to be displayed on a display device with pixel cells having the same size as the raster spacing, then the upper-...


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Welcome Adam. If your intended use only requires accurately drawing the quadrilateral defined by points 1,2,3,4, and then I assume placing other objects you're working on relative to it, then all you really need is to look up in Autocad how to specify an object (polyline?) using azimuth and distance. (It's been a while since I used AutoCad and it may ...


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Meanwhile geopandas has added a function for this use case: Creating a GeoDataFrame from a DataFrame with coordinates, based on the docs, can be done most simply: from geopandas import GeoDataFrame as gdf import geopandas import pandas as pd df = pd.DataFrame( {'City': ['Buenos Aires', 'Brasilia', 'Santiago', 'Bogota', 'Caracas'], 'Country': ['...


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Thanks to @PMK here is the C# implementation of it. My change is to get x-Number of points between start and end instead of getting all points in x distance /// <summary> /// Calculates the distance between two lat, long coordinate pairs /// </summary> /// <param name="lat1"></param> /// <param name=...


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You can use BulkVectorExport plug-in to save layers in your project to CSV (or to other output formats). In this case all columns are written to the text file, but you can use the Python sources of the plug-in to customize. Look for run function in bulkvectorexport.py, the QgsVectorFileWriter.writeAsVectorFormat function (in line 204) has an attributes ...


2

If you want to write all the values of the ycoord field into a .txt file, you can execute the following code in the Python Console of QGIS (change the parameters with your own): layer = iface.activeLayer() # your layer features = layer.getFeatures() # features of your layer with open('C:/Users/v.bre/Downloads/ycoord.txt','w') as my_file: # Change the path ...


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The process of adding geospatial coordinates (lat/long or northing/easting) to addresses is called geocoding. Ian Turton's answer is probably the easiest method in the UK. For any addresses outside the UK, you can use the MMQGIS plugin (tutorial). There are other ways, which you can easily find now that you know the right search term.


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You will need some coordinates for your postcodes. The easiest place to get them is by downloading code-point from the Ordnance Survey. You can then join the two layers together to make a map.


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It is some version of State Plane Nevada East with measurements in feet. For example, choosing ESRI:102707 from the EPSG database (http://epsg.io/102707) yields coordinates in that range near 35.16 N lat, -114 W long. Note that there are several alternative specifications of the State Plane Nevada East projection, so if you don't get the exact one, your ...


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It seems to be EPSG:3421. (955999, 26397850) translates to Lat 35.1612555° Lon -114.5801733° at epsg.io. When looking for projected CRS on the basis of given coordinates, I'm using SHPProjFinder tool. This is local Java program, based on similar algorihms as projfinder.com, but with much improved efficieny.


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I think I've found the coordinate system you're looking for. Your unknown coordinate reference system seems to be referred to in Rwanda as ITRF 2005 / TM Rwanda. It is a projected coordinate system using Transverse Mercator with the following parameters : False Easting : 500,000 False Northing : 5,000,000 Central meridian : 30 Latitude of origin : 0 Scale ...


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If you are interested in masking the data, I would recommend rioxarray. An example of doing so can be found here. Here is a targeted example for what you probably want to do: from shapely.geometry import mapping from shapely.wkt import loads import rioxarray geom = mapping(loads('POLYGON ((5.5937209 52.24012314 0,5.5936411 52.24048512 0,5.59413417 52....


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It looks like those latitudes and longitudes are based on arcminutes somehow. If I divide your numbers by 600,000, I arrive at -20.2806183, -45.6169416, close to the point you mention in Calcario Cazanga mining site in Arcos, Brazil: If you apply this logic to all your coordinates (divide them by 600,000), and then assign epsg 4326, that might be the ...


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The arcpy.Geometry type supports a projectAs(spatial_reference, {transformation_name}) request, so it should be simple to project a singleton point (PointGeometry) from GeoJSON to the spatial reference of your target layer. Of course, projecting the point is only the first step in your process, since selection and rendering is done at a layer level, not ...


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Use arcpy.Project_management() to convert from one coordinate system to another (including to/from a projected from/to a geographic CRS). See the documentation at: Project You could convert either your shapefile, or your GeoJSON to an in_memory feature class with the same CRS as the other, and then work with that in_memory feature class instead of the ...


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Make a sample raster: > r = raster() > r[] = 10 * (1:ncell(r)) Note the value of the cell is going to be 10 times the cell number... Which row is latitude -20? > row = rowFromY(r, -20) > row [1] 111 Row 111. Ok. What are the cell numbers for row 111? > cells = cellFromRow(r, row) > cells[1:10] [1] 39601 39602 39603 39604 39605 39606 ...


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