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5

The right way is probably to create a child (related) table with a record for each opening interval. For example: Main (store) table: +----+------+ | id | name | +----+------+ | 1 | Foo | +----+------+ | 2 | Bar | +----+------+ opening hours table: +----+----------+-----+-------+-------+ | id | store_id | day | open | close | +----+----------+-----+--...


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If you're on linux, try converting .shp files downloaded directly from the census website to geoJSON data using the gdal command line tool. For Debian/Ubuntu that means installing the gdal-bin package, and then running a command like this one: ogr2ogr -f GeoJSON cb_2018_us_cbsa_20m.json cb_2018_us_cbsa_20m.shp


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Just found this query and realized I'm trying to do the same thing but going back to 1970. In case you didn't find it yet, the Missouri Census Data Center's Geocorr application has already done these intersects and provided crosswalks going back through the 1990 census, which should allow you to get this crosswalk post-1982 redistricting. http://mcdc....


1

You may want to check out the relatively new MERIT-DEM, which is mostly SRTM but heavily corrected (especially north of 60 degrees). You can download it in tiles. They also have corresponding hydrologic models (MERIT-Hydro) that include flow directions, flow accumulations, channel widths, height above nearest drainage, and a depression-filled DEM. All global....


1

You can download a 90-m resolution DEM from http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org/download. It covers both Uruguay and all of South America.


0

You may download a shapefile of the quaternary watersheds for most of the province (James Bay/Hudson Bay watershed looks to be excluded) from LIO: https://www.javacoeapp.lrc.gov.on.ca/geonetwork/srv/en/main.home?uuid=7a99025f-b894-4b8c-97c4-60f830fa1acc There are a number of good resources there, which you can download and use in your own GIS. I'm not ...


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In QGIS 3.2.3, it's possible, without using GDAL. When generating the contours, just check the "Produce 3D Vector" in the "Advanced Parameters". After that, just export the layer with "Save As". The option "Include Z dimension" will be checked already.


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The Office for National Statistics Postcode Directory has postcode and county and is a downloadable dataset. Note this is the administrative county, whereas often people think in terms of the ceremonial county or even historic county. If you want either of those then Ordnance Survey produces shape files. All open data.


2

There are lots of places to download GIS data and imagery around the web but they can be tricky to find. Earth Explorer is a good option that searches by location, time, and data set, giving you access to lots of imagery for free. This includes imagery from NAIP / NAPP, which is probably the most applicable to your project. https://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/ ...


1

There is the Open-Elevation API (https://open-elevation.com/) that looks promising see https://github.com/Jorl17/open-elevation/blob/master/docs/api.md for API examples Live API sample: https://api.open-elevation.com/api/v1/lookup?locations=41.161758,-8.583933


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For those continuing to search (I was and landed here). There is a free USGS service which is well buried. Link here. Worked for my use case of a couple of dozen points. HT to @barrycarter for the index link.


3

I think you will struggle to find those regional shapefiles. But when i've needed country wide shapefiles, i tend to use Natural Earth: http://www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/10m-cultural-vectors/ In your case, i would download the "Admin 0 - Countries" file. If you then open this shapefile into, let's say QGIS or ArcMap, open the attributes table and ...


3

r.sim.sediment is a tool from the GRASS toolbox. You can find documentation for GRASS tools by clicking the "Help" link in the QGIS tool dialog for that tool, or go straight here: https://grass.osgeo.org/grass64/manuals/r.sim.sediment.html It shows that you need a few raster data sets over your study area, including elevation, water depth and so on. If ...


0

High resolution imagery is available via EOS LandViewer with built-in tools available for image analysis. You can compare two images side-by-side as well. Here’s a quick guide on high-resolution satellites and their resolution details: Pléiades 1A, 1B (up to 0.5 m/pxl) SPOT 6, 7 (up to 1.5 m/pxl) SPOT 5 (up to 2.5 m/pxl) KOMPSAT-2 (up to 1 m/pxl) KOMPSAT-...


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