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4

You don't need to split the raster at all. There are a couple ways to do it. One is to use two tools in succession: Use Reclassify to convert the elevation values in your raster. Use the natural breaks you've already found as the bins to reclassify your raster to just 3 values: 1 (lowland), 2 (middle) and 3 (upland). Use Raster to Polygon to convert your ...


3

As noted in comments, you likely need to build overviews. Overviews and inner tiling optimize two different types of access: Having overviews optimizes the most the case when you're trying to look at the the whole raster on a small map, that is, the case where the GIS software needs to produce an output image that's smaller than the original raster. ...


3

Create raster with cell values of 1 using raster calculator, e.g. Con(~IsNull("dem"),1) Draw section at stream 'mouth' and use above raster as cost surface and section line as input feature for Cost Distance tool. You'll get something like this: Convert raster to points and remove unwanted points downstream from section line. Sort points in ...


2

You can use Split Raster in the Data Management toolbox. https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/tool-reference/data-management/split-raster.htm Within the tool you can specify the output raster size, number of tiles, or use a polygon feature class (i.e. a fishnet). The tool requires that you specify an output folder and base name for each resulting raster.


2

I am unsure how accurate you want your results to be, my understanding is that you can do one of two approaches: Find known water level points for the rainfall event and create an interpolated surface, do a quick raster calc to find areas where terrain is higher than the water surface and youll get an approximate extent of flooding. The more standard ...


2

You can use the Extract by Attributes tool in the Spatial Analyst toolbox to create a new raster from a range of data. You will need to sort out ModelBuilder iterators, or loop the Extract by Attributes tool with Python to get each of your classifications into different files.


1

You can also use BlenderGIS plugin to import georeferenced images in Blender. Also, BlenderGIS can download SRTM directly into blender from inside Blender if you want. It is a very useful plugin dedicated to integrate GIS data with 3D visualization. Here is a blog: Shaded relief with BlenderGIS (2020) that explains on how to use BlenderGIS step by step to ...


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There is an excellent blog by somethingaboutmaps that goes in-depth on how to create the shaded relief in Blender. It is quite lengthy and receives updates and edits via the blog.


1

With pretrained weights, such as those used in the example, you cannot just add another band / layer of information. This is because the pretrained weights are made for standard RGB imagery and does not work with four layers of input. As such, you have two options: Drop the pretrained weights Reduce your dimensions from four to three. Options are dropping a ...


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