9

If you want to use Census tracts the good people at Brown University have already done the hard work for you: Brown University Longitudinal Tract Database This resource contains tract-level variables from 1970-2000 interpolated to 2010 boundaries, facilitating longitudinal analysis.


3

I don't think BLS unemployment data is available by ZIP. The MelissaData source does not actually report unemployment by ZIP code, it tells you the unemployment of the county in which the entered ZIP code is located. For example, a search for 02451, a small ZIP code in Waltham, MA (population 60k) returns 826k people in the labor force. This number must be ...


3

I have used this kind of socio-economic data for a number of projects. It can be very helpful to break out of the district polygons by laying a square grid over the area (side length based on either metres or minutes), and then using a script, calculate a score for each grid cell (e.g. if a grid cell straddles two districts, then calculate a cell value ...


2

I don't think you can get income data at block level for privacy issues. For blocks, you can only get population and households. As far as I know, the lowest level of geography you can get income data for is block groups. Block groups typically contain between 600 and 3000 people, have an optimal size is ∼1500 people and ∼30 blocks, though in Miami-Dade BGs ...


2

As I have said in my comment, you will not get the layers with 2011 census information. However village layer with 2001 census information are available from Survey of India at a fixed price. I have also found some data at this link: https://archive.org/details/IndiaVillageBoundaries I cannot vouch for its heritage, completeness or accuracy, but what ...


2

Regarding the correlation between zips and counties. The zip code boundaries are generally stable, assuming the post office doesn't close a ton of offices like some people think they need to do. The big problem is that many zip code areas cross political boundaries. Some small cities can be entirely within a larger zip code. While it is possible to match ...


2

Not exactly the same thing (nothing pre-configured) but most or much of this data (for the US) is in census data for free. You'd have to extract it and configure it yourself, although in some cases that's done for you, i.e. American Community Survey and the like. I also see on their home page that the census has mobile apps. Not the easiest site to navigate,...


2

The Census Bureau provides this type of information. However, the amount of specificity you are asking about is more than what they are willing to provide (for privacy reasons). The closest table is B27015 which covers general insurance status by household income category at the Census Tract level. Oh, and for reference, the Census Tract level is the lowest ...


2

The only area in the US I could find is based in California by the Healthcare Workforce Development Division (HWDD). They collect GIS data in terms of: Medical Service Study Areas Health Professional Shortage Areas Medically Underserved Areas / Medically Underserved Population And other miscellaneous data The site contains shapefiles, PDF maps and Excel ...


2

Have you ever looked at all the data provided by the European Union and its member states? Such as eurostat or inspire geoportal? Within eurostat you will find a page on population density which will help you in your quest...but you will likely have to do some manipulation bringing together several products to create what you are looking for. Like download ...


2

I suggest NHGIS Data finder. They have ACS 2010-2014 data available and you can download the GIS boundary files as well. Note that you have to register (for free).


2

There is the TIGER/Line® with Selected Demographic and Economic Data which states "These geodatabases were created using ArcGIS 10.1." I was able to pull income from FactFinder (directed there by US Census) and I produced this "Economic" income result for Chicago through the advanced search: The data can be downloaded after you produce your report.


2

Look for INSPIRE. INSPIRE is a European initiative that nudges member countries to make geographically oriented data available for all, for free. In the Netherlands this has resulted in -among others- a site PDOK that offers map-layers of all kind. Many of the layers are instantiated from databases and can be queried. Many of these layers have a temporal ...


2

If you actually wanted to proportionally colour the polygons themselves rather than including diagrams you could do something involving layered gradient fills using the underlying data to determine the extent and offset of the fills. It isn't neat but it does colour the actual polygons rather than overlaying something on top. Attribute Data: You will ...


2

There’s two parts to this.. assuming you have the coordinates (lat/lon) Urban Classification For something like this you might want to take a look at Corine Land Classification. This is a raster with a series of classifications (Dense Urban, Light Urban, Farmland, Vineyard, Water, Peat Bog…). It’s then a matter of doing a point-to-raster sampling. You ...


2

Tested on QGIS 2.18 and QGIS 3.4 I can suggest using a "Virtual Layer" through Layer > Add Layer > Add/Edit Virtual Layer... I have tried to recreate your example. There are two overlapping polygon layers called "layer"(yellow) and "grid_layer"(blue) accordingly, see image below. All features of "grid_layer" squares have 10.000 m² area. With the ...


2

According to the variable list at https://www2.census.gov/geo/tiger/TIGER_DP/2013ACS/Metadata/BG_Metadata_2013.txt, it should be the unweighted estimate of the total population.


1

If you are only looking at a single county, I assume you're probably looking at Block Group or Tract level data? Since the number of records in your dataset should be relatively small, and you have all of the data available, I would just export your selected records from the most recent dataset to a local geodatabase. If you are just looking at population, ...


1

If I understand your question correctly, you just need to join the csv to the boundary shapefile. You should use a table join. Add both datasets to ArcGIS. Open the attribute table of the dissemination area. Add a join with the csv based on a common field (dissemination area name maybe?). If you want the join to be permanent, you'll need to export the ...


1

It is possible to display multiple values using a polygon with appropriate attribute table data in QGIS. However, when you want to display multiple values within a polygon you have to use an approach through the properties option of the vector dataset. In the layer's properties dialogue box you will find a tab called "Diagrams" there you could specify ...


1

The Maptitude Mapping software from Caliper Corporation will allow you to select all of the Census Block Groups for an area and see the geographic information as well as the Median Income value for each block group. You would have to purchase the software and the additional block group data. The tools in Maptitude make it easy to visually select the block ...


1

Right, there is a way to build a dictionary of changed attributes and pass it directly to the provider's changeAttributeValues method after the whole for loop. The script would look like this: # feats is a python list: feats = [feat for feat in layer.getFeatures(QgsFeatureRequest().setFlags(QgsFeatureRequest.NoGeometry).setSubsetOfAttributes(limit_cols)) ] ...


1

The National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS) might be worth looking at. They have made available aggregate US census data and GIS-compatible boundary files.


1

For metro data you would likely need to create a new shapefile and manually input the data for your cities. You can find historical city populations out there but I'm not sure if it's the most practical idea to use it. You should focus on using counties. https://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/pop1790-1990.html That is a link to historical US ...


1

I agree that it should be an issue of concern, especially if you're normalizing your data using geography. There are several different techniques for disggregating data using area weighting models. In addition, if you're actually using Zip Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTA) and the other data are population based, you could use zip code crosswalk tables to ...


1

Full Disclosure: I work for Caliper Corporation. I wouldn't normally try to sell anybody a product here, but this is a good fit. The Maptitude GIS Product from Caliper offers many of the tools and datasets that Community Analyst offers. Maptitude comes with the Census datasets included, including Zip code boundaries. The Maptitude website shows a list ...


1

I have recently been doing something like this (I work in health research) and I did not find the learning curve for QGIS exceptionally steep. I also used Google's free geocoding service with great results. Its usage limits shouldn't be a problem for you, especially if you only need neighbourhood-level accuracy and can de-duplicate your data. But I was using ...


1

Be warned, joining census data to census tigerline shapefiles is a bit more complicated than a simple join. Downloading 2010 or 2000 Census Blocks is simple enough and can be found here: http://www.census.gov/geo/www/tiger/tgrshp2010/tgrshp2010.html When you select the file type you want there will be an option to download either the 2010 or 2000 version....


1

Well if you were doing it in ArcGIS then it would probably be easier to do it in the opposite order. There is US Census data freely available. Boundary files are here: http://www.census.gov/geo/www/cob/ Then you just need to append the data onto the attribute table. If you already have the average household income data with Census Tract IDs attached, it's ...


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