45

Most of the time, people make the mistake of thinking of the GeoDatabase as simply a geospatial format that allows you to do spatial queries. That is such an incredible simplification. Heck, I used to make this mistake myself - until one day I heard Scott Morehouse explaining the rationales behind the GeoDatabase. He is one of those people that can think in ...


37

I do it all the time for my clients. Dump your data to FileGDB or Shapefiles then execute the following command: For ESRI Shapefiles: ogr2ogr -f "PostgreSQL" PG:"dbname=mydbname user=postgres" myshapefile.shp For FileGDB: ogr2ogr -f "PostgreSQL" PG:"dbname=mydbname user=postgres" myFileGDB.gdb For FileGDB, you need to make sure that the FileGDB ...


37

Right click on the mxd in ArcCatalog, click on Set data sources, and bulk change from there. However, this tool warns: Note: this dialog is intended primarily for preparing map documents for publication. Customizations (VBA code, UI Controls and custom toolbars), graphs, and table window appearance properties are removed from .mxd files when you update ...


27

Well, I found the answer. Esri did in fact answer this with an in depth presentation at the 2010 San Diego User Conference called "Managing Imagery and Raster Data in ArcGIS". Here is the link for anyone else who is interested: http://gis.idaho.gov/portal/pdf/Framework/Imagery/ManagingImageryRaster.pdf My short summary of this is: Raster Catalog is on ...


23

It means that the field is indexed. You can change the character used to indicate whether a field is indexed under the Table Options > Appearance menu:


22

This is such a great question. Coverages, Shapefile and Geodatabases are fundamentally different geospatial data stores from an implementation standpoint as well as from a philosophical one. I'll try to summarize without going too deep into it. 1. Coverages: Coverages are interesting geospatial data structures. They concentrate on storing topology. So you ...


20

If you have installed a 64-bit version of QGIS on Windows and you find that Personal GeoDatabases (*.mdb) no longer work for you, then this solution might apply; I'm on QGIS 2.8.1 rather than 2.6, but I assume that the issue and thus the solution is the same. The underlying issue relates to this GDAL bug: Problem reading MDBs (64-bit) Step 1 Download the ...


19

Check out this function from by Bjorn Kuiper to test if a field exists : def FieldExist(featureclass, fieldname): fieldList = arcpy.ListFields(featureclass, fieldname) fieldCount = len(fieldList) if (fieldCount == 1): return True else: return False with the following example of use: if (not FieldExist(myFeatureClass, "...


17

The reason that people organize data in separate tables is because of Database Normalization principles (follow the link, all the rationale is there). That being said, ESRI Relationship Classes are a GeoDatabase-level implementation of a those principles. Honestly, I would personally only use them in two instances: when you have some data that is normalized ...


16

If you are using ArcGIS 10 and are interested in using Python, check out the help on Updating and fixing data sources with arcpy.mapping and the methods of the Layer object. Example: import arcpy mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(r"C:\Project\Project_SDE1.mxd") mxd.findAndReplaceWorkspacePaths(r"Database Connections\Connection to GISSDE1.sde", ...


15

chawkins I believe what you are looking for is called the World Port Index, the dataset is produced and maintained? by the NGA and can be found here http://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=msi_portal_page_62&pubCode=0015 The data is stored in an access DB the site also has a shape file which I've not looked at it yet but should ...


14

Just use OSGeo4W and install the gdal-filegdb package. I compiled and uploaded the binaries to include them as part of the distribution. File Geodatabase (*.gdb) support in QGIS? has a step by step recipe.


14

ESRI has a blog post - aptly titled Dicing Godzillas - about processing feature classes with large amounts of vertices. It discusses the Dice tool, which splits up a shapefile's features into smaller features with less vertices. You won't find much of a difference (if any) running in ArcCatalog vs. ArcMap. However, you might find some improvement by ...


12

Here is something I put together that works on the simple gdb's I have on hand. I don't know how it might or might not handle sub-types with multiple domains (see Brent's comment). Usage: python export_gdb_domains.py [input geodatabase] It exports the tables to the same gdb it's getting the domains from. It will fail if the table(s) exist already. ''' ...


12

you can use arcpy: import arcpy myField = "test" env.workspace = "D:/test/data.gdb" fcs = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() for f in fcs: fieldList = arcpy.ListFields(f) for field in fieldList: if field.name == myField: print f Beside this you can use os.walk for files in your drive as: path = r"C:" for root, dirs, files in os....


12

Most of the information can be found in Esri Help and some search, so I've just compiled some good reads. How coverages are stored? Since it is a proprietary format, you won't find any technical specifications on how the algorithms are implemented (unless @Vince will shed some light). Shapefiles came later on and were implemented as a standard which ...


11

As far as I am aware there is currently no way to make schema edits in a geodatabase without either dropping and adding fields, or deleting and reloading feature classes/tables. The latter is what I recommend in order to maintain field order. What I normally do is: Make a backup of the original feature class Export the original feature class's schema to an ...


10

If you are convenient with Python then writing script for this task is preferred. Take a look at these key things: Get a list of featureclasses/shapefiles in gdb/folder - ListFeatureClasses. In the bottom of this help article there is also an example "Copy shapefiles to a geodatabase" which you can use to start writing script. Check for existence of ...


10

The Object Loader and Simple Data Loader allow you to load data into empty feature classes or feature classes that already contain data. The Simple Data Loader also allows you to load into stand-alone tables. While the Object Loader and Simple Data Loader are similar loading wizards, the Object Loader provides the following functionality that the Simple ...


10

Another way to search for feature classes, which may or may not be in a dataset is to use the walk function, as mentioned before. It requires only a workspace to search in (i.e. a folder containing hundreds of GDBs). import arcpy, os workspace = "Path/to/folder" search = "name_string_you_are_searching_for" feature_classes = [] for dirpath, dirnames, ...


10

The asterisk means that the field has an index. A Shapefile does not have any indexed fields by default, you need to add them. A GeoDatabase Featureclass always has a spatial index on the Shape field and attribute index on the ObjectID.


10

Finally I've updated my ArcGIS Server instance (including GeoEvent Extension and Enterprise GeoDatabase) to the new license successfully. Find below my performed steps to complete the update-process: Update your ArcGIS Server license (and extensions) by double-clicking on the license file, which will start the Software-Authorization wizard. Optionally you ...


9

I am guessing you are referring to "Reserved Words" and special characters. Take a look at the following links, but ultimately reserved words and reserved characters are going to be more DATABASE (shapefile, MS Access, Oracle, SQL Server, etc) dependent vs ARCGIS dependent. ESRI KB- What characters should not be used in ArcGIS for field names and table ...


9

According to this post, the default display field is chosen according to the following priorities: First field of type Text whose name contains the word "name" (case-insensitive) First field of type Text First field of an integer type (Long or Short, presumably) First field of any type I don't think there is any way to specify the primary display field ...


9

I think the key is the difference between how Windows Explorer treats a single file, and how ArcCatalog/ArcGIS treat a raster. There are a few factors here. In the File GDB format, a raster is not represented by a single file. It is made up of the data table, along with probably pyramids and indexes. Why this is important is because when ArcCatalog is ...


9

It is possible that there is something wrong with resolution and tolerance in PGDB. Take a look at sections X,y resolution and X,y tolerance in this topic. Try increasing these values. What coordinate system are you using? What values are set for resolution and tolerance?


9

I was working with SDE connection files today. You can search C: for .sde files, or in Win 7 you can find them in C:\%userprofile%\AppData\Roaming\ESRI\Desktop10.0\ArcCatalog\ But the layer definition will store connection info in the mxd as well. See this forum post. In any case, like the others say, it sounds like you should change the sde password. ...


9

There is a wonderful Add-in called X-ray for ArcCatalog. It has many features, but the one we ended up using was the 'Analyze Difference' tool from the Tools menu. It finds for you the difference between a Geodatabase and an XML workspace Document. We just exported the schema of our Template Geodatabase to XML, and compared the different Geodatabases to it....


9

Assuming that you are able to start ArcMap, you should be able to add data stored within your file geodatabase (a folder with .gdb at the end) by using either Catalog window or the Add data button in the ArcMap application. http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//00s50000000v000000 http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#...


9

As @PolyGeo said, you won't be able to use the in_memory workspace for Geodatabases. If you want a "temporary" geodatabase that is saved on disk, you can use the Scratch GDB. #Set the path to GDB, if desired. #Consult help if you don't want to set this and want to know its location. arcpy.env.scratchWorkspace = r"D:\GIS\data" #Path to newly created gdb. ...


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