3

I assume that there is a physical Oracle table that sees insert/update events as the REST service fires. And that those events aren't a complete truncate/reload. If so I would create a before insert/update trigger and construct an sde.st_geometry object from the X,y columns. No indexes should exist before the initial load; create them after the load. As ...


3

Try Explode Lines tool (in Processing Toolbox > Vector geometry) to extract segments out of your red line layer. Then open the Layer Properties > Label of the produced Exploded layer and give an expression: degrees(azimuth(start_point($geometry), end_point($geometry))) You need the labels, not the exploded line segments. To hide the Exploded line ...


2

The easiest way I found to get the bounding box from a geometry that crosses the antimeridian using OGR/GDAL is by using the gdal.VectorTranslate() function, which is the Python binding for OGR2OGR. If you pass the -lco WRITE_BBOX=YES option as a parameter, the output file will contain the correct bounding box. from osgeo import ogr, gdal import json ...


2

You can use Aggregatortransformer. Be careful what mode you choose. To illustrate, I have 5 polygons in entry. If I choose : Geometry - Assemble One Level : The result is one feature (merging of the 5). Geometry - Assemble Hierarchy : The result is five features. I specify the mergefield (here FID), I have 5 unique values so I will keep the 5 geometries.


2

Number 1 will have least overhead. Based on map extent used most often set smallest grid slightly smaller than this map extent zoomed to. Set next middle grid 3 times this value. Set largest grid three times the middle grid value. This works like a spatial index explained here: https://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/latest/manage-data/using-sql-with-gdbs/...


2

While PostGIS uses Well-Known Binary internally, you'd be better off explicitly casting the PostGIS geometry to Well-Known Text or Binary. Try SELECT a.objectid, a.shape, b.objectid AS oid FROM cd.points a JOIN sw.risk_polygons b ON sde.st_intersects(a.shape, sde.st_geometry(ST_AsText(b.shape), 4326)) = 1 ORDER BY a.objectid; or SELECT ...


1

The error was that the column order in the SELECT query was mixed, it has to be SELECT id, geom, name, not SELECT id, name, geom. Thanks to @ThingumaBob for the solution.


1

You can use v.to.db for this (see also keyword index, under "compactness"). Beforehand you need to vectorize your raster map with r.to.vect.


1

GeoPackages are SQLite databases with a specific structure. You cannot just read geometries as "random" sequential bytes from a SQLite database, there might be fragmentation or similar. If you want to do it low-level and without one of the fine libraries others suggested, the pure Python standard library way would be to use sqlite3 to open the file and then ...


1

TOAD writes out the meta data of Oracles ST_GEOMETRY UDT implementation for ESRIs SDE; it's essentially a list of geometric predicates describing the geometry, and the vertex array that builds the geometry type, held as BLOB: ST_GEOMETRY( <ENTITY>, -- geometry type (POINT, LINESTRING, ...) <NUMPTS>, -- number of points <MINX>, ...


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