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The tools aren't trying to talk to a URL on the internet. When you launch the tools, ArcMap is actually constructing tool pages in HTML (this is an incredibly simplified explanation). Anyways, the point is it makes use of ActiveX and HTML to show these tool dialogues, as such your Internet Settings on the machine come into play. There are a lot of Esri ...


3

Reading the answer you linked carefully you can see that you could copy the shapefile whose fields you are trying to change using the Feature Class to Feature Class tool. This tool gives you a Field Map section with a list of all your original fields and the possibility to change the length property before actually copying the input sahpefile. So basically, ...


2

I know my answer is late, but this post didn't have an answer so I'd rather give the solution for people that might end up here : Calling the ogr2ogr command via os.system() didn't work for me either, so I found a way around importing this file : https://github.com/OSGeo/gdal/blob/master/gdal/swig/python/samples/ogr2ogr.py You then have to use it like this ...


2

You cannot get current status of the tool execution when it has been executed in Python (arcpy). The tool would have to execute Asynchronously, not blocking your application to support this. If it was Async you'd assign the execution call to a variable and check the variable status. Thats exactly how a GP Service works. But your scenario is calling a tool in ...


2

The quickest way to answer your question (imho) : a good SQL query using QGIS DB Manager. You choose Database / Database Manager / Database Manager then Virtual Layers / Qgis Layers and you can then try the following query (you open the SQL window by clicking on the 'wrench' icon) : SELECT LU.type, sum(st_area(st_intersection(LU.geometry,FLO.geometry)) ...


2

Symmetrical Difference is likely the best tool for your application (though it does required an Advanced license). https://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/tool-reference/analysis/symmetrical-difference.htm Features or portions of features in the input and update features that do not overlap will be written to the output feature class.


2

If you scroll the overlay layer dropdown menu you can choose an empty value (in first position). Result will be an union between self intersections of the source layer entities.


2

You don't need a loop. Use shift in difference operation. (I used df instead of polygondata for legibility) df['geometry'] = df['geometry'].difference(df['geometry'].shift(1)) df.loc[0, 'geometry'] = polygon1


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Assuming your points table has this structure: Buffer them (shapefile) by known radius (R) and run this field calculator expression on field "Shape": from math import radians,sin,cos def sector (A,X,Y,R): arr=arcpy.Array(arcpy.Point(X,Y)) for i in range (-30,31): a=radians(A+i ) arr.add(arcpy.Point(X+R*sin(a),Y+R*cos(a))) pgon=arcpy.Polygon(arr) ...


2

Make sure you get correct syntax for Calculate Field. It is best to include parameter names (for example in_table='blablabla') instead of just relying on order/index of parameters: arcpy.CalculateField_management (in_table="sometable", field="somefield", expression="someexpression",...) For example you are providing outputFilePath + '/' + name[:-4] as ...


2

There are many solutions to iterate over (Geo)DataFrame row pairs (see Pandas iterate over DataFrame row pairs for example) 1) by iteration for (indx1,row1),(indx2,row2) in zip(data_gpd[:-1].iterrows(),data_gpd[1:].iterrows()): print(indx1, indx2, row1['geometry'].distance(row2['geometry'])) 0 1 83538.37731261192 1 2 119611.60785001986 2 3 27537....


1

You can't* do this using FeatureVerticesToPoints without writing to an intermediate feature class. You have two options: Use FeatureVerticesToPoints and write to the in_memory workspace, then append: arcpy.management.FeatureVerticesToPoints(input_lines, "in_memory\\output_points", "ALL") arcpy.management.Append("in_memory\\output_points", existing_fc, "...


1

The arcpy.SetParameter() function does not return anything and it is used to pass an object to a parameter of the Geoprocessing Tool which direction is Output. When you say This variable is set in the geoprocessing tool interface do you mean is set as an input parameter? I believe you want to read those parameters instead of setting them. You could try: ...


1

I'd make use of Validate Table Name and GISPro's Alter Domain. You can alter your domain names using Validate Table Name to remove spaces. Untested since I don't have ArcGIS Pro: inGdb = r"Domained\gdb" outGdb = r"output\gdb" #---- print ("importing") import arcpy import os print ("listing domains") domains = [d.name for d in arcpy.da.ListDomains (inGdb)]...


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There are various ways that this could be tackled, quite a simple way would be to use the Vector - Geoprocessing tools - Clip to create a new layer with just the areas of land-use that are within the flood area. Layers need to be in the same CRS. You could then use Vector - Geoprocessing - Dissolve to dissolve each land-use types into single polygons ...


1

There is also a QGIS 3.x tool (Orthogonalize) orthogonalises line or polygon-shaped geometry. It depends only on an angle tolerance.


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