4

I have a note on that tutorial for this very case. "...If the map you are trying to georeference uses a projected CRS that you know of, but the graticules labels are in a Geographic CRS (latitude/longitude), you may use an alternate workflow to minimize distortion. Instead of using a Geographic CRS like we are using here, you can create a vector grid in ...


4

Just a wild guess, to me it looks similar to a Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection, rotated 80 degrees (I mean, looking from N80E toward N100W direction). (Above: North Pole area by QGIS 3.8 on EPSG:102017 North_Pole_Lambert_Azimuthal_Equal_Area, rotating 80.0 degrees).


2

These are georeferencing error vectors that visualize the dX and dY values of the georeferencing results. Long lines indicate that there is a large error between where the point is on the ungeoreferenced map and where it lies in reality. This may affect your overall quality of georeferencing. Make sure that the points that you choose cover the whole image ...


2

If image gets rotated in the georeferencing process it is inevident that triangle shaped nodata areas appear at the corners of the georeferenced image. There are a few different ways to deal with the nodata area. I clipped a part of your image to be used as a test case. Do nothing with the nodata. Georeferencer just fills the slivers with black pixels. That ...


1

I hope I understood your problem correctly (although still don't know why you added timestamps at the end if your csv clearly shows the time being two string columns). First of all, you have to define an origin in space for your tensor. This origin consists of a lon, lat pair of coordinates that represent the upper left corner of your array. Let's assume ...


1

Georeference it to UTM Zone 21, using the UTM coordinates. That should be a good fit. You would need to select a different model like polynomial for reprojecting.


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