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I uncompressed TIFF files each pixel takes a fixed number of bits. However, TIFF files can be compressed and contiguous areas with uniform pixel values like the nodata-area in your image can be compressed extremely well even with lossless compression method like "deflate" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deflate. Basic command for creating a deflate ...


2

Rasters are just a grid of numbers - they don't inherently have colors attached to them. It sounds like the symbology of your raster defaulted to something different from what you were expecting. Trying selecting a different colormap or band combination under the Appearance tab for your raster layer.


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1- One way is contacting the developer/owner/project manager/scientist who puts the .tif files online. 2- Another way is to read the .tif description (some kind of internal metadata that is available via .tif format. 3- Is to locate the bounds and look at its aerial/satellite images and speculate what it might be. 4- If your raster is accompanied by an *.hdr ...


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What you script is doing at the moment is just testing if the raster's noDataValue is set to True, it's not actually checking if there are noData values, but what value has been specified to represent noData. I think you need to use the GetRasterProperties function and call out the ANYNODATA property. Try this edited version of your script: import arcpy ...


1

I like to use 'pyexiftool' for this particular case, which is a python wrapper for the useful program 'exiftool': http://smarnach.github.io/pyexiftool/ It has built in functionality to handle multiple images, which will be handy for you when mining for ML inputs.


1

The message about not georeferenced image is partly misleading. The georeferencing method that gdalbuildvrt support is the affine GeoTransform https://gdal.org/user/raster_data_model.html. Your image is georeferenced with Ground Control Points (GCP). GDAL datasets have two ways of describing the relationship between raster positions (in pixel/line ...


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There is no support for WebP, neither as a data source, nor as an output format. Both ends have pluggable extension points, so it's possible to create a GeoServer extension adding support for them, with some Java programming.


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To go along with the answer by user30184, adding the following will further decrease your file size: -co PREDICTOR=2 Reference: https://kokoalberti.com/articles/geotiff-compression-optimization-guide/


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Solved. The .tif files are loading properly in QGIS. $files = Get-ChildItem . foreach ($f in $files){ $path = "C:\Users\Me\Desktop\New folder\" $infile = $f.FullName $outfile = $path + $f.BaseName + ".tif" Get-Content $f.FullName | gdal_translate -of GTiff $infile $outfile }


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You can do this, by saving it in a text file and changing the extension to .bat: set pathin=F:\mydirectoryname\In set pathout=F:\mydirectoryname\Out set filename=merged_file gdalbuildvrt -allow_projection_difference index.vrt %pathin%\*.tif gdal_translate index.vrt %pathout%\%filename%.tif -tr 0.3 0.3 -co COMPRESS=LZW -co BIGTIFF=YES -a_nodata 0 Then ...


1

Just opened a GeoTIFF with internal overviews with ArcGIS Pro. It finds 6 overview levels, just as GDAL does. In another test I removed the internal pyramids and opened the file again. This time ArcGIS pro wants to create pyramids. Conclusion: ArcGIS Pro can use internal pyramids even it prefers external pyramids when it creates them. That if not a wonder ...


1

Export each vector polygon to its own separate, single-polygon layer. Then rasterize each of those layers to a tiff.


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