33

It's a well known and longstanding issue that gdalwarp doesn't deal with compression well. The solution is to gdalwarp without compression then gdal_translate with compression. To avoid two lengthy processes, gdalwarp to VRT first, it's really quick, then gdal_translate with the -co compress=lzw option. i.e. $ gdalwarp -tap -tr 30 30 -t_srs "etc..." -of ...


27

I propose two solutions: the first one using QGIS, the second one using Python (GDAL). Solution using QGIS In QGIS you may create a VRT mosaic. Please follow this procedure (see the image below): Load the raster in the Layers Panel; Right-click on it and choose Save As...; Check the Create VRT option; Choose the folder where your outputs will be saved; ...


25

Using rasterio you could do import rasterio file_list = ['file1.tif', 'file2.tif', 'file3.tif'] # Read metadata of first file with rasterio.open(file_list[0]) as src0: meta = src0.meta # Update meta to reflect the number of layers meta.update(count = len(file_list)) # Read each layer and write it to stack with rasterio.open('stack.tif', 'w', **meta) ...


21

Files ending with 'w' (tfw, jpw or jgw, bpw and so on) are world files. These files are used to geolocate rasters that otherwise have no means of geolocation. They tell the GIS where the file's origin is in the real world and the size and rotation of the pixels. however, they do not store any information about projection. You only need a world file if ...


18

If QGIS is runnig in a 1000x1000 pixel sized window on your screen there is no need to read all 32000x32000 pixels for showing the map. GDAL tries to read data from the source image so that no data at all is read outsize the bounding box, and if image has overviews the data come from the resolution level that is best suitable for the map resolution. There is ...


17

I would recommend to use gdalcopyproj.py, a sample file from the GDAL repository done for this purpose as mentioned directly in the script: Duplicate the geotransform and projection metadata from one raster dataset to another, which can be useful after performing image manipulations with other software that ignores or discards georeferencing ...


17

Your script is missing the ds.FlushCache method, that saves to disk what you have in memory at the end of the modifications. See below a corrected version of your example. Notice that I also added two lines to set projection and geotransform as input import os import gdal file = "path+filename" ds = gdal.Open(file) band = ds.GetRasterBand(1) arr = band....


16

So you want a geotiff instead of a tiff with a world file (.tfw). This should be the default in GDAL (http://www.gdal.org/frmt_gtiff.html) so: gdal_translate -of GTiff input.tif ouput.tif It will default to geotiff.


16

Building on what @David mentioned you may use open source gdal library using python module to get image extent like this: import gdal from gdalconst import GA_ReadOnly data = gdal.Open('C:/Temp/myimage.tif', GA_ReadOnly) geoTransform = data.GetGeoTransform() minx = geoTransform[0] maxy = geoTransform[3] maxx = minx + geoTransform[1] * data.RasterXSize miny ...


16

This should get you going. The raster values are read using rasterio, and pixel centre coordinates are converted to Eastings/Northings using affine, which are then converted to Latitude/Longitude using pyproj. Most arrays have the same shape as the input raster. import rasterio import numpy as np from affine import Affine from pyproj import Proj, transform ...


16

You can do this using GDAL, it directly supports XYZ format. It doesn't matter if your coordinates are UTM, gdal_translate will output in the same coordinate system. So to convert to GeoTIFF is as simple as: gdal_translate test.xyz test.tif Look at the GeoTIFF doc for output options (such as compression) and the gdal_translate doc for more usage info. In ...


15

By default an RGB image will be written to an RGB color model JPEG image, but this is not actually the most efficient way of writing to JPEG. It is better to convert to the YCbCr color space, and encode that. This is in fact the typical form of standalone JPEGs and what GDAL will produce when writing to a free standing JPEG file. Compressing a 4K x 2.6K ...


15

If using GDAL 2.1+ it's as simple as gdal.BuildVRT then gdal.Translate: from osgeo import gdal outvrt = '/vsimem/stacked.vrt' #/vsimem is special in-memory virtual "directory" outtif = '/tmp/stacked.tif' tifs = ['a.tif', 'b.tif', 'c.tif', 'd.tif'] #or for all tifs in a dir #import glob #tifs = glob.glob('dir/*.tif') outds = gdal.BuildVRT(outvrt, tifs, ...


14

Short answer: I suspect there is no such standard for TIFF or GeoTIFF overviews. There are multiple implementations, methods and formats to define overviews for GeoTIFFs. GeoTIFF is based on the TIFF format (PDF specification for Revision 6.0, from 1992). The format has support for multi-page documents or subfiles, similar to a multi-page PDF. A GeoTIFF ...


13

gdal_translate -of GTiff C:\temp\input\a.img C:\temp\output\a.tif and the batch option GDAL_translate: converting ESRI GRID to Geotiff in batch '-of GTiff' this part is probably not even required as this is the default but will do no harm.


13

I haven't found any specific commandline utility that can report if a tiff is tiled or striped. At least not directly or in a grepable form like TILED=YES. There should be enough information in gdalinfo to make that decision, however. I have a landsat scene, each made with gdal_translate: landsat_tiled.tif : -co TILED=YES landsat_notiled.tif: -co TILED=...


12

Quantum GIS now supports this feature, the resolution can be set and can include an optional world file containing georeferencing information. In the print composer check the "World file on" box under Export settings.


12

Have you looked at using FWTools? There is a python script called gdal_merge that is available within FWTools. You can use a list as input. The command with usage would be: gdal_merge -o c:\temp\output_image.tif -q -v --optfile c:\temp\rasterlist.txt


12

You should be able to do this using the gdal_translate command line tool. http://www.gdal.org/gdal_translate.html To convert to Arc/Info ASCII Grid: gdal_translate -of AAIGrid elevation.tif elevation.asc To convert to ASCII Gridded XYZ: gdal_translate -of XYZ elevation.tif elevation.xyz Binary executables of the GDAL tools are available here: http://...


12

The coordinates of the target extent have to be expressed in the target SRS: -te xmin ymin xmax ymax: set georeferenced extents of output file to be created (in target SRS). Being... >cs2cs +init=EPSG:4326 +to +init=EPSG:3857 5 43 556597.45 5311971.85 0.00 15 48 1669792.36 6106854.83 0.00 the command should be something like: ...


12

Create a box as a Spatial object and crop your raster by the box. e <- as(extent(-16, -7.25, 4, 12.75), 'SpatialPolygons') crs(e) <- "+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs" r <- crop(worldpopcount, e)


11

here's a better answer, use gdalbuildvrt with either srcnodata or vrtnodata flag: gdalbuildvrt -srcnodata "123 231 67" outfile.vrt input.tif If the next application in line doesn't understand .vrt, translate to a new tif: gdal_translate outfile.vrt final.tif


11

In a generic sense, use the affine transform parameters, which should be available with any raster file format. With GDAL, this is available with GetGeoTransform(), or PostGIS' ST_GeoReference() function. After finding these six parameters, one only needs to determine which ones they are, then a function can be made to transform in linear space. E.g., with ...


11

Are there any drawbacks to doing this? There are softwares that are not going to be able to read BIGTIFF. It is likely that most geospatial/GIS software that consumes raster data can now handle BIGTIFF, but others might not have been updated or make assumptions about maximum sizes. BIGTIFF support did and does require some software implementation. If you ...


11

Those files are generated in ArcGIS. Are auxiliary files for georeferencing and visualization, aren't part of GTiff as .shx or .dbf are in a shapefile. .tfw is ESRI World file .ovr are piramid layers .xml is schema look and histogram .cpg is for TIFF interpretation. .dbf is for raster attribute table (thanks to @radouxju) You can add .tfw using GDAL ...


11

New raster tables must be added into existing GeoPackage as subdatasets as documented in the GDAL driver manual page http://www.gdal.org/drv_geopackage_raster.html. Have a look at the fifth example Addition of a new subdataset to an existing GeoPackage, and choose a non default name for the raster table. gdal_translate -of GPKG new.tif existing.gpkg -...


10

Or you can use geotifcp (http://www.remotesensing.org/geotiff/geotifcp.html). To dump the data from a GeoTiff to a world file try listgeo (http://www.remotesensing.org/geotiff/listgeo.html). Updated links as of 2017-05-21 http://geotiff.maptools.org/geotifcp.html http://geotiff.maptools.org/listgeo.html


10

If you have a raster DEM already, then there is a tool that I developed in Whitebox Geospatial Analysis Tools called Remove Off-Terrain Objects, contained within the LiDAR toolbox, that works well for creating bare-earth DEMs, particularly in urban and agricultural settings. It works less well where either the terrain is steeply sloped or the forest cover is ...


10

You can easily open ASCII xyz triplicate data in QGIS under "Add Raster Data" with a "ASCII Gridded XYZ (.xyz)" file type. You can also covert it to a different format under the "Raster > Conversion > Translate (Convert format)" menu. Alternately, you can do this under the "Raster > Conversion > Rasterize" menu with a "Comma Separated Value (.csv)" file type....


10

There are two programs using the libgeotiff library that will let you export and import georeferencing info from GeoTIFFs (and other image file formats): listgeo for saving the georeferencing info into a file, and geotifcp for writing the info from that file back to the image file after it's been edited. Downloads for the libgeotiff library can be found here:...


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