17

There are 60 UTM Zones, each 6 degrees wide (about 700km at the equator), and stretching from 84 degrees North to 80 degrees South (the poles are reference with the Universal Polar Stereographic grid system). So the "UTM Zone" is technically just the number part (eg: 12), a long strip effectively from pole to pole, within which Eastings and Northings are ...


8

There is no export to shapefile via Google Earth. These steps when using the Google Earth web version: Once you are in the project section, you can click on the three vertical dots and then export as KML file as mentioned on this thread These steps when using Earth Pro desktop version: You will need to right-click the polygon layer, then click on Save As ...


7

I don't know for sure, but as you guessed, the effect you're seeing on the water is likely just stitching between images. This looks like aerial imagery (from an airplane, not a satellite), which means that there were probably multiple overlapping images available for each place, and the stitching algorithm can take advantage of that to make the stitch ...


3

You have your coordinates in the wrong order for Earth Engine. The appropriate order is [East-Coordinate, North-Coordinate]. So it should work by just switching the order of your coordinates.


3

The CascadingStyle tag isn't supported, but this works <Style id="__managed_style_25EBAAC82614827EFCCB"> <IconStyle> <scale>1.2</scale> <Icon> <href>https://earth.google.com/earth/rpc/cc/icon?color=1976d2&amp;id=2000&amp;scale=4</href> </...


2

You can bring KML files into Google Earth for web, and there are numerous tools to convert from GeoJSON to KML.


2

In Google earth you can right click on the location of the image then save as Once you are done with your photos, you save them in a folder in MyPlaces. You can give them the same names as the photos.Then right click on the folder name and select "Save Place As..." Choose the KMZ or KML Format and load it to your software. If your photos are Geotagged, ...


2

Select the "Inspector" tab on the right-hand-side and click inside your geometry. You'll notice that some of your images have one or more bands masked. Each image has an ORIGINAL_BANDS_PRESENT property. You can use this to filter out images missing your required bands. var Image_filtered = dataset .filterBounds(geometry_Mt_Spurr) .filter(ee.Filter....


2

In order to export the data, you'll first need to apply for access to Earth Engine, which you can do using the Sign Up button in the upper right corner of https://earthengine.google.com. Once you have access, the data can be exported with just a few lines of code, e.g. var points = ee.FeatureCollection('WCMC/WDPA/current/points'); Export.table.toDrive({ ...


1

I am also not behind this stitching. I believe adjusting / stitching algorithm is being totally confused by so many various not matching shapes and contrasts of waves. It is simply overwhelmed, and not able to properly find the match between neighbouring photos. And so at the "edges of photos" it creates these 'weird' patterns. The problem with ...


1

One reasonable way to fix it is via code. We must open our .kml file in i.e. Notepad ++, where next we should: Find our broken polygon (Ctrl+F) If you find your broken polygon, you can compare it with the previous or the next one. At first glance, you will spot, that the code is wrong. Firstly, the <styleUrl> must be changed from #line-000000-3000 ...


1

You could draw a polygon around South America, or use an additional dataset of simplified country shapefiles for South America. The latter is done below. Use filterBounds() to filter on only the polygons of the featureCollection within South America: var polygons = ee.FeatureCollection('WCMC/WDPA/current/polygons'); var table = ee.FeatureCollection("...


1

You will need to translate the code into Python, yes. Theoretically, if you have a function that meets the same kind of requirements as a function used in an ImageCollection.map (no prints or other side effects or client-side computation) then it would be possible to ask the Earth Engine API to transform ('encode'/'serialize') it into the form that it would ...


1

So, finally I came up with the following solution as the OL Parser does not support cascadingStyle Tag: function removeBadTags (rawSource) { let result = rawSource; // remove "cascadingStyle" Tags result = rawSource.replace(/<.*?cascadingstyle.*?kml:id="(.+)">\s*<style>/gmi, (a, b) => { return "<...


1

I don't know of a good automated way. Here's what I do. In QGIS, create a layer with the ROI - as a rectangle or two diagonal points - saved as KML Import the KML into GE, zoom to the ROI, keep it viible, and select the historical imagery desired. Make sure to reset tilt and compass. Save as image, removing all extraneous decorations under Options, and ...


1

You write var field1 = ee.FeatureCollection(region.filterMetadata("system:index","equals","00000000000000000000").first()); You haven't defined the global variable region in the code you shared, but assuming it is a collection of features, first() of it is a feature, not a feature collection. Unfortunately, while the documentation of ee.FeatureCollection()...


1

I experienced this problem just now and came up on this answer. I noticed the error message had pyKML with capitalized letters. It will work if you use all lowercase letters.


1

You could try to use ee.Image.reduceConnectedComponents(). The problem there is that you have a maxSize, the maximum number of pixels a component can contain. If a component is larger than that, it gets masked. You can increase this value, but processing will get slower, and finally you will run out of memory. A workaround to this could be to split your ...


1

On this line var clippedCollection = collection.map(clipToShp) you refer to the variable collection, but it is not defined anywhere above. Perhaps you meant to write S2.map(clipToShp)? Whenever you see an error like is not defined in this scope it means that you have made a mistake in the variable names in your script. You should examine where in your ...


1

OK, According to this query proposed by @J.R: QGIS exporting attributes in a KML file which refers mainly to the older versions of QGIS (2x) In QGIS 3.10 we must change in the "Geometry" type from automatic to Polygon as per in the image below: And then we will have our data attribute table shown in Google Earth as follows:


1

Finally I used leaflet-markercluster plugin and implemented into my GeoJSON layers as per the example below: https://jsfiddle.net/m6jr7e0p/


1

For downloading raw data, I would rather suggest that you use specific data provider. The longest historical time series of high resolution data, as far as I know, is Landsat. So you can use EarthExplorer, draw a box and define the time period that you want.


1

QGIS is using the EPSG registry http://www.epsg-registry.org/ as the authority and in the EPSG registry the Area of Use for EPSG:32712 is between 114°W and 108°W, southern hemisphere between 80°S and equator, onshore and offshore. The northen part has another EPSG code, EPSG:32612, and it is valid between 114°W and 108°W, northern hemisphere between equator ...


1

It looks like your KML has not been converted to fusion table properly. There are no rows/features. Fusion tables are getting shut down after December 3rd anyways so it might be a better idea to go a different route. One way is to conver the KML to SHP and then upload that directly to GEE. Edit: Sorry it seems I completely missed the image part. But yea, ...


1

I just found out that there exists a reproject method in ee.Image. So when I change my code to the following, the result image is consistent var snic = ee.Algorithms.Image.Segmentation.SNIC({ image: image, compactness: 0, connectivity: 8, neighborhoodSize: 64, size: 3, seeds: seeds }).reproject({ crs: 'EPSG:4326', scale: 5 });


1

I am the author of the QGIS Climb plugin. All the points on the line have to have an elevation value. For the out-of-QGIS-core version - https://plugins.qgis.org/plugins/Climb/, the elevation values can be acquired from a supplied DEM by the plugin. For the QGIS core algorithm version (under QGIS, Vector analysis in the processing toolbox) you need to ...


1

Approximate US postal code polygons are available from census.gov. The data you want is called ZCTA (Zip Code Tabulation Areas). This is the closest approximation to real postal code areas you can get without spending huge amounts of money. It's good enough for most purposes. The most recent are probably from 2010, since that's when the most recent census ...


1

These are all out of date. Yes, you can see oil rigs off the coast of California. Actually for the past few years. They are in lines of 4 Starting around Santa Barbara.


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