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18

The solution to this is not in ArcGIS. Unfortunatly, you have to change your region settings in Windows. On Windows 7, the solution is to go to Control Panel, Region and Language, then click on Additional settings... Under Digit Grouping Symbol, just type in a space instead of a comma. Results:


13

There is possibility to do it in Print Composer now. Also it is possible to simply manually create vector layer with grid in QGIS (Vector->Research Tools->Vector Grid) - the only way if more grids are needed in one frame (update: from QGIS 2.6 it is possible to do more grids for frames). In Composer Manager select map frame and go to Item Properties / Grid


9

Create a polygon grid using the Vector Grid tool instead of lines. Make sure to check the polygon output. Once you have a polygon grid (also known as fishnet), you can use the Sum line length tool in the QGIS Vector analysis tools. This will result in a new field for each cell with the total road length inside it Here's a simple example of a vector ...


9

'View > Decorations > Grid'. The Grid properties allows you to set line type and interval, as well as any annotations (such as lat/lon). This is purely an overlay that you can't interact with and doesn't render in the print composer.


7

Unicode has some superscript and subscript characters in it as described on Wikipedia Here are two custom functions that can be entered in the QGIS Python Function Editor that superscript or subscript the digits in strings passed to them: Superscript @qgsfunction(args='auto', group='Custom') def supscr_num(inputText, feature, parent): """ Converts any ...


7

In the print composer, create three grids on your map item: one for the actual grid lines one for X values (to disable grid lines, set them to "No pen") one for Y values (idem) For Y coordinates, you want to see 1 2 3 4 ... Depending on your max and min coordinates, and interval, use the Custom format in the Draw coordinates submenu. You can add an offset ...


7

The grid creator makes very simple lines with vertices only on each end. You'll need to 'densify' the geometry (adding extra vertices) so that intermediate points can be projected and define the shape of the lines correctly. For example, here's an unprojected map with a default grid from QGIS (5° intervals): If we change the projection (Aitoff 54043), the ...


6

In the Data Frames Properties dialog, select Grids, then select your graticule and click Properties. The last tab (Intervals) in Properties allows you to modify the interval for your parallels and meridians, as well as their origin. In your example your merdians are every 4°, probably the same for the parallels. The default origin is -90, which with 4° ...


6

As user30184 pointed out, there's a tool that does the trick. Run the tool Create Fishnet Simply put your old 1km grid in the Template extent. This will populate the coordinates of your extent. Then fill the "Cell Size Width" and "Cell Size Height" with 500 geometry type > polygon That's it


6

As far as I know there isn't a specific tool to do that, but others have already built tools for the creation of isometric grids. I found this toolbox you can download and use. I tested it a few times and it seems to work well in general, but you might still need to perform some manual operations of clipping the points layers, or generating new centroids ...


6

You need to scroll down just a little bit more to find Grids options. Then the difference from the linked tutorial are: Click on Modify grid... to call up Appearance properties. Set CRS for the Grid in this Appearance menu.


6

To perform dynamic North Pole grid orintation paste the code (see below) in Map rotation box parameter of your map item. Here is a comparison with a static oriented grid: Code block (in a line): -1 * degrees(azimuth(map_get(item_variables('map'), 'map_extent_center'),transform(geom_from_wkt('POINT(0 90)'),'EPSG:4326',map_get(item_variables('map'),'...


5

Not built in , AFAIK. The way I do this is by creating a polygon shape file "grid" and then reprojecting it. So you could: enable On-the-fly reprojection Set the CRS to Lat/Lon Use the Vector->Research Tools->Vector Grid to create a polygon grid at whatever interval is appropriate Display the polygons with no fill, to show only the grid lines. Return to ...


5

Read about Data Driven Pages. Between a strip map or an indexed map with a fishnet grid you will have a map series that will be exactly what you're looking for.


5

Under the map's Item Properties panel, look for the "Grids" section. Expand that out and click the green "+" button to add a new grid (you can now have multiple grids per map):


5

If you use a negative Label Offset on the Labels tab of the Reference System Properties, it will move them where you want:


5

When you are in Print Composer you can select the map in the Item Properties tab and then scroll down to Grids where you click on the + button to add a grid. You can then modify the grid and it's frame. In your case you may just want the frame and no grid at all.


5

It is feasible, don't worry about coordinate systems though. It can be in no coordinate system or it can be in any coordinate system. You could use your local coordinate system and plop the grid on top of your house or in the back yard. You can do this with a simple 3x3 grid of polygons and create a field to record the status of each plant. Then symbolize ...


5

I need to create a grid of points within a given area so that each point is 75m across the ground from any other point There are cases where this may be impossible mathematically. For illustration purposes, if you are laying a fishnet on the curved 3D earth surface with neighboring points 100 km apart from each other (about 1 degree apart) and in ...


4

Thanks to the other answers I was able to do it this way: Determine the wanted UTM coordinates. UTM zone: determine the zone between 1 and 60 by looking at a map like here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Transverse_Mercator_coordinate_system EPSG code for the UTM zone: on WGS84 it is EPSG:326xx, where xx is the number of the zone (see http://www....


4

I don't think a new release or service pack will resolve the issue, though you could always add it to ideas.arcgis.com and see what happens. Perhaps an alternative approach might work for you though: Add two grids, one with north-south only lines/labels and the other with east-west only and make each in a different style/font/colour. This will address the ...


4

Who's your target audience? I agree that graticules (or - as an ex-surveyor - reticule) is the word that first came to mind, but if you're aiming this at a less-experienced user base, then I would stick to something more descriptive like your suggestion of Coordinate Grid and Distance Grid.


4

Create a fishnet http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//00170000002q000000 If you want to actually split the data, you need to do some sort of intersect.


4

After calculating areas of the 1km grid shapefile rectangles, I can confirm that the single cells are not precisely 1km². The error is small, though. If your errors are larger, it is possible that your problem is related to a different issue (possible reprojection errors). Small errors in the source dataset Most of the calculated areas are less than 10m² ...


4

Let's stick with the UK ellipsoid + datum (to avoid datum transformation issues). You will inevitably have the "problem" is that the Ordnance Survey grids are defined on the OS projection which is a transverse Mercator projection with central longitude 2°W and central scale 0.9996012717. The scale variation over Britain is roughly 0.9996 to 1.0002 (...


4

Burning polygons into a raster is by far the most efficient way to classify a graticule as containing land (or not). The ALL_TOUCHED=TRUE rasterizing option ensures that a graticule location is "contained" if even a small part of a polygon touches it. The processing should take a few minutes to do. from osgeo import ogr, gdal # Shapefile, PG: connection, ...


4

This was a bug in the development version of QGIS which coincidentally was fixed yesterday! See https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/commit/3af6dbc4e1fc49b4b755a542e9583573365a4bd2 . Download the next daily snapshot and you should be right.


4

Use spsample with cellsize: pts = spsample(leg, cellsize=c(10000,10000), type="regular") plot(leg) points(pts) check the coordinate spacing: > coordinates(pts)[1:10,] x1 x2 17 244356 4437161 18 254356 4437161 19 264356 4437161 you see the x coordinate going by 10,000 (and if you look later on you'll see the y coordinate does too)


4

You can set the extent of your map by going on the layer properties > Data Frame > Clipping There you can use one of your polygon with any shape and the graticule wil fit to this extent. In your case you need a rectangle drawn in a geographic coordinate system (densify its vertices before reprojecting to your conical projection)


4

On windows 2.14 you get the same layout as the one you see on your Apple. The one you see in 2.16 is the form from the tool in the Processing toolbox. So it isn't an apple/windows thing; just different versions of QGIS.


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