Hot answers tagged

13

In QGIS 2, you can use layer actions to open the file with the default image viewer if you have the filepath in your attribute table. Since QGIS 3.2, you can use the "import geotagged photos" algorithm in the Processing toolbox. It creates a point layer. Then use the layer actions described above. You will not be able to display pictures like in Digikam, to ...


11

In the Help for Supported raster dataset file formats it says: ArcCatalog only recognizes the .jpg file extension by default. To add .jpeg or .jpe files to ArcMap without renaming them, add those file extensions to ArcCatalog or drag those files from Windows Explorer into your map.


8

This is currently not supported. The only way you are able to do this is to embed or link a png in a SVG file. Adding support for loading other image formats shouldn't be too hard for a future version.


7

You can make ArcCatalog recognize .jpeg files by adding it as a File Type in ArcCatalog options. Inside ArcCatalog: From the main menu choose: Customize Select ArcCatalog Options Under the File Types tab choose New Type... Enter "jpeg" and "JPEG Image" .jpeg images will now display in ArcCatalog. UPDATE: For ArcMap, you have to separately add .jpeg as a ...


7

The gdal_translate document page http://www.gdal.org/gdal_translate.html may indeed give an impression that the values for Ground Control Points should be closed between brackets [-gcp pixel line easting northing [elevation]]* However, that is not the case as close reading reveals and correct syntax for your case is gdal_translate -of GTiff -a_srs EPSG:...


7

Right-click on any file with the desired file type or extension, choose “Properties” from the context menu. The “Properties” dialog appears. Click on the “Open With” tab. Select the desired application for the given file type. All files with the same extension will now be opened with this program by default and file icons will be changed. Set the default ...


5

This is old but I had the same error "PageLayoutObject: Error in executing ExportToJPEG". The problem for me was that I was trying to write to a folder that didn't exist. Once I created the folder, it worked fine. This also makes me think that if you had some other kind of permissions problem that didn't let you write to the output file it might also be ...


5

Use Copy Raster tool to convert georeferenced tiffs to jpeg format.


5

in the QGIS trainingsmanual there is a chapter about digitizing forestry-maps: https://docs.qgis.org/3.4/en/docs/training_manual/forestry/stands_digitazing.html. You can use the same method that is described there.


4

QGIS now has a very impressive rendering engine which you can use to drape one image over another. For example you can get a nice "3D effect" by draping an ortho-photo over a hillshade raster. You set the rendering in the first raster's Layer Properties page on the "Style" tab. There are several kinds of rendering, the "Darken" or "Multiply" options gives an ...


4

You can georeference a JPG image if you can identify parts of the image in another basemap or geo-referenced dataset of any kind. Get the georeferencing toolbar from the Customize Menu. When you bring the image in (add it like you would any other data) it won't match anything spatially so you will need to match areas in the JPEG with areas in your basemap ...


4

The world file is as follows: X-cell size rotation (usually 0) rotation (usually 0) Y-cell size (always negative) Upper left X Upper left Y Read about it here and from Esri 9.2 Assuming your width/height is in cells and not in map units the other corner is: #YCellSize is always negative so adding is a subtract which is a double negative #Thank you to ...


4

I've had to do something very similar using some cobbled together python script: >>> field_name = "name" >>> mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") ... for i in range(1, mxd.dataDrivenPages.pageCount + 1): ... mxd.dataDrivenPages.currentPageID = i ... row = mxd.dataDrivenPages.pageRow ... print row.getValue(field_name) ... ...


4

You need to make a list of the jpeg's and the n loop trough them. You can use the glob module for that: import arcpy, os , glob outworkspace = r"C:\Project\out\OtherFormat" listOfJPG = glob.glob( r"C:\Project\out\*.jpg") arcpy.RasterToOtherFormat_conversion(listOfJPG , outworkspace ,"TIFF") print 'converted'


4

This option is only available in Data View. If you are in Layout View then you will not be able to Write a World File. This software behaviour is unchanged in ArcGIS 10.4 for Desktop Pre-release. For it to be enhanced I suggest you submit an ArcGIS Idea. I was surprised not to find one when I looked just now. If you do submit one then I suggest ...


4

QuickMapServices plugin with contributed services added in Settings for the aerial background. Photo2Shape or Geotag and import photos to get a point layer from exif gps coordinates. Duplicate the point layer and change styling from dot symbol to arrow symbol (not nice, but an arrow). Set "Angle" for the simple marker to the imported compass field. Python ...


4

Gps Prune is a nice, peformant tool (java) to work with photos - especially since an export as csv is quick, to further process in qgis. Not sure about working with the angle etc.


4

ESRI provides the extension of ArcScan and you can complete Automatic Vectorization to create content. This of course does require you to do a bit of manual work. but less than re-digitzing. To turn ArcScan on: click Customize>Extensions Turn on ArcScan Right Click the grey space on your toolbar (where no other tools are). select ArcScan There are ...


4

It seems a known issue, and there is a solution for that. Check Bug: Picture symbol legend patches, there are some instructions on how to solve this issue from ESRI help.


4

You have to georeference the raster first. Its not just about a CRS, but the extent of the raster (in CRS units) too. You make yourselve double work if you digitize data from the raster, and then try to adjust that to reference maps like bing. There are a few tools to georeference vector data, but you will not have the convenient "pick from canvas" tool.


4

for path variables use this r"this\is\your\path" the r stands for 'raw' it tells python this is a path string.


4

Now that QGIS 3.6 is out, this is easy, at least the symbology part. (Others have suggested ImportPhotos plugin for getting the photos in in the first place.) Once you have a point layer with each photo's name and/or URL in an attribute, style the layer with Raster Image Marker as the symbol layer type. Then in the data-driven override on the right, specify ...


4

Taking a look at the geopandas mapping documentation, it seems that you can plot a GeoDataFrame by calling the plot() method on it. Here is one example from the documentation: import geopandas world = geopandas.read_file(geopandas.datasets.get_path('naturalearth_lowres')) world.plot() To export the plot as a .jpg file, you can simply use the matplotlib....


4

According to the QImagery help-page, you should try EPSG:3857 (Pseudo Mercator). In addition you must tell QGIS which CRS to use. From the top menu, choose Settings – Options and the CRS-tab. Choose e.g. the option "Prompt for CRS" when a layer is loaded that has no CRS (or "USe project CRS" if you have set the project CRS to be 3857 in beforehand). QGIS ...


4

It turns out you cant JPEG compress a raster which has data type Float32. It is working when I convert it to type Byte with the -ot flag: gdal_translate -ot Byte -co COMPRESS=JPEG -co TILED=YES /home/bera/Drives/ssd1/Hillshades/test.tif /home/bera/Drives/ssd1/Hillshades/test_JPEG.tif From 3.3 GB to 62 MB


3

Based on your comment, it sounds like you are adding each raster band separately, instead of the raster dataset. When you use the Add Data button and navigate to your jpg, don't double click on the jpg filename and select the individual bands, just select the file itself and click the Add button.


3

Downloaded the raster from your link and used GDAL_Translate from the command line and the image was awful. Your source image is 32bit RGBA, JPEG does not support RGBA so I tried -b 1 -b 2 -b 3 to pluck out the RGB bands from the 32bit: the QGIS translator gives you the option to edit the command so insert -b 1 -b 2 -b 3 into this line and your JPEG ...


3

If you want to use QGIS for this, here a tutorial which I have written for a similar problem: http://gis.cri.fmach.it/download/tutorials/geocoding_maps_from_articles.pdf


3

Can you go into ArcMap and load one of the Basemap and then bring that jpg to it and use the Georeferencing toolbox ?


3

Please try to find out known points or nodes which are matching to Google. Try at least 3 points from Google. I know it is very difficult case but go deeply with your map and google map. or try to find out any 3 corner points of a municipal boundary. Another way is try to get a georeferenced map of your municipal corporation then try to rubber sheet it with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible