18

Your viewer, or the website, has some problem with the fonts. Perhaps your browser does not get access to the defined fonts. Works for me, though, and this is how it should look: Coordinates are expressed as degrees, minutes, and seconds. Try the file downloads https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2012L01081/Download. EDIT I have the same issue than you ...


17

This is perfectly normal behaviour in a transverse Mercator projection. The fact that a specific northing does not match a specific latitude (except for the Equator itself) can be easily visualized. We are used to seeing global maps of the more familiar equatorial-aspect (or normal) Mercator projection, which depicts parallels and meridians as perfectly ...


10

You can use a simple transformation function with shapely.ops' transform function. For example: def flip(x, y): """Flips the x and y coordinate values""" return y, x Example use: >>> from shapely.geometry import * >>> from shapely.ops import transform >>> poly = box(*Point(1.23, 9.87).buffer(1)...


7

I would hazard a guess that the latitude is off by 1 degree, and the coordinates may refer to Williamstown Observatory, because using 37 instead of 38 degrees, the coordinates would be S37° 52' 6.6", E144° 54' 49.5", a mere 200 meters away from the Williamstown Timeball Tower (37°52′00.6″S 144°54′45.7″E) (seen on the right in the picture below). ...


7

You can flip them using Python: import re layer = iface.activeLayer() #Click layer in table of contents unflipped_field = 'wktstring' #Change flipped_field = 'wktflipped' #Change. This text field will be calculated with edit(layer): for f in layer.getFeatures(): #For each row in the attribute table oldval = f[unflipped_field] #Fetch unflipped ...


7

It seems to be a problem with the website, and the intended rendering should be using the usual degrees, minutes and seconds symbols: °, ′, and ″. As noted by other users, different browsers and PDF readers behave differently. If you look at the website's header, you can see that it explicitly claims that the page is UTF-8: $ curl -v 'https://www.legislation....


6

The most simple expression nowadays is this one for x | lon coordinate, if the layer is not already in the desired CRS: x(transform($geometry, layer_property(@layer_name, 'crs'),'EPSG:4326')) and y(transform($geometry, layer_property(@layer_name, 'crs'),'EPSG:4326')) for y | lat coordinate. You can use it for example in QGIS field calculator or anywhere ...


6

You can use geopy and its Nominatim geocoder. Here is an example using the DataFrame you provided: import geopy import pandas as pd def get_zipcode(df, geolocator, lat_field, lon_field): location = geolocator.reverse((df[lat_field], df[lon_field])) return location.raw['address']['postcode'] geolocator = geopy.Nominatim(user_agent='my-application')...


6

You can use QGIS: Add delimited text layer Reproject Layer Add geometry attributes


4

The las format defines that points have X/Y/Z coordinates and it defines how to include information about georeferencing https://www.asprs.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/LAS_1_4_r13.pdf. However, it is not clearly defined what X and Y mean. Traditionally many GIS software consider that X is always longitude or easting and Y is latitude or northing. But ...


4

It is not standarized, you must communicate the datum used. If there is not a vertical datum, it is inferred that the heights are ellipsoidal heights over the ellipsoid of the horizontal datum, in this case WGS84. Also, to convert from LLH to ECEF, you need to know the ellipsoidal height, so if the height provided is not the ellipsoidal height, you need to ...


4

The code you cited as reference assumes h is ellipsoidal height, which is pretty standard when you specify WGS84 as your reference frame (i would avoid using the word Datum if not talking about a legacy local reference frame). When you say: x = (h + N) * cos_lambda * cos_phi; y = (h + N) * cos_lambda * sin_phi; z = (h + (1 — e_sq) * N) * sin_lambda; ...


4

Before exporting there are several more steps have to be applied. Create two additional fields, i.e. "lat" and "long" via Open Field Calculator Apply the following expressions for "lat" and "long" respectively lat: x(transform($geometry, 'EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:31370')) long: y(transform($geometry, 'EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:31370')) or alternatively, you can already ...


4

To include varying projections in the transformation to lat/lon (EPSG:4326), you can use a variable for the current EPSG of your source, so than you don't have to care about which EPSG your data is in, see here: Getting lat/long for centroids using QGIS You can use this directly in the field calculator, adapting the expression as follows, whereas "x&...


4

Feature coordinates must always be transformed to the view projection var marker = new ol.Feature(new ol.geom.Point(coordinates).transform('EPSG:4326', map.getView().getProjection()));


3

UTM zones are 6 degree bands, see figure https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Transverse_Mercator_coordinate_system - and then the EPSG code is 32600+x where x is the band number. e.g. New York is between 72W and 78W so that's zone 18, North, so use EPSG code 32618: https://epsg.io/32618 There are some exceptions where UTM zones get split and tweaked in ...


3

It seems you have imported the nc file as a raster layer. Then, there is a SAGA Transpose raster layers tool in the QGIS Processing Toolbox > SAGA > Raster tools. This tool swaps X and Y axis of the input raster.


3

In that example, the TYPE is Geometry which is a Point type and the SRID of the geom column is set as >> geom GEOMETRY(POINT, 26913). So..... ST_MakePoint(longitude, latitude) makes the point with the lat, long provided. ST_SetSRID(XXXXXXX, 4326) sets the projection of the lat, long provided 4326 (WGS84). ST_Transform(XXXXXXX,26913) transforms the ...


3

The meridians correspond to the natural fact that the sun reaches the zenith once a day simultaneously for a set of points that form a straight line from one pole to the other, cutting the equator in a right angle. So meridians are not just artificial lines, but correspond somehow to a natural aspect, something that can be measured. Even with your bare eye, ...


3

Trying to put it really simply, the way I see it is this. If I go out with my compass (or gps, or some other kind of navigation tool) and head north I will eventually get to a point where I can't head north anymore. But if I go out with my compass and head east I will never get to a point where I can't head east, I can just keep going. If I head North, from ...


3

Your question reads more like a rant than a question, but we're supposed to be nice to newcomers, so here goes: When using the GEOMETRY data type, distances are computed by simply using Pythagoras' theorem on the coordinates, without considering what the coordinates actually mean. In the case of EPSG:4326, coordinates are latitudes and longitues (i.e. polar ...


3

Let's assume there is a .csv-file with your data, where lat/long delimited by comma, see image below Drag&Drop your CSV into QGIS Deploy Virtual Layers through Layer > Add Layer > Add/Edit Virtual Layer.... In the Query window just simply paste the following expression: SELECT *, ST_GeomFromText('POLYGON((' || "coord_values" || '))', #...


3

Attributes are static. They do not update automatically (Except in virtual layers or fields). You can use fieldcalculator in QGIS on your shapefile with these expressions to update your fields: For X: x(transform($geometry, layer_property(@layer_name, 'crs'),'EPSG:3006')) For Y: y(transform($geometry, layer_property(@layer_name, 'crs'),'EPSG:3006')) This ...


3

At this point, Python zip function comes into play. layer = iface.activeLayer() layer.startEditing() longitudes = [5, 10, 15, 20] latitudes = [5, 10, 5, 10] ### zip function in list comprehension coords = [QgsPointXY(lon, lat) for lon, lat in zip(longitudes, latitudes)] ### feature = QgsFeature() line = QgsGeometry.fromPolylineXY(coords) feature....


3

If you're just looking for extreme values of x/y coordinates, you could use QGIS with this expression (e.g. in the field calculator): x_max( $geometry) - replace x with y and max with min for the according values. Download a vector file for US states, e.g. from OpenStreetMap. There are different ways to do than, one is using Overpass Turbo. Create a ...


3

You will need to learn how to use field calculator. See this section of the manual to start. Then, your field is a string (text) field from which you need to extract the relevant substrings for the x coordinate and y coordinate and convert them into numbers. The expression substr(string,startpos,length) will let you extract length characters starting at ...


2

In the most recent version of QGIS, they added a feature called "Add X/Y Field to Layer" which (In this case you're wanting the lats/longs of a point layer) will add the latitude & longitude to your specified projection as x (longitude) & y (latitude) columns


2

To save someone else the time and aggravation of doing this incorrectly, I'd like to clearly point out that when importing XY data, the Geometry CRS (of the data you're importing) needs to be set to EPSG:4326 (WGS 84). My project (and default) CRSs are set to the standard for my locality; you just need to be sure to set the data import CRS to EPSG:4326. The ...


2

In my case, the x/y variables were of type numpy.float32 (read out of an array) which caused this exact error. Changing the types to regular float worked.


2

For geocoding with ArcGIS, credentials have to be provided gis = GIS("http://www.arcgis.com", "username", "password"). In terms of pandas, this code should do the work (adapted from @Marcelo Villa's answer) from arcgis.geocoding import reverse_geocode from arcgis.geometry import Geometry from arcgis.gis import GIS import pandas as pd gis = GIS("http://www....


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