Hot answers tagged

27

Use groups of layers to simplify your editing and then don't lock the frame by right-clicking on it but instead use the 'Lock layers for map item' check box in the Map tab. I group my layers according to the map frame I want them in. Then, I can quickly turn on and off a set of layers as I set up the map frame the first time and then click the 'Lock layers ...


19

Yes - I use the Rectangle Text tool from the Draw toolbar instead. It is not well known (see the number of times it is requested on ArcGIS Ideas) but is documented as Adding text that flows within a graphic: You can add text that flows within a graphic to your map annotation or graphic text by using the Polygon Text, Rectangle Text, and Circle Text ...


13

Well, With Qgis 2.0, you can click the "Layout" menu, then "Move Content", and adjust the layers to your liking


11

You can add an Arrow in Arcmap. This is what you need to do: Using the Draw toolbar insert a straight line. Double click on the line and change its properties as illustrated in the below


10

It is not possible to create a new Layout Element from scratch using ArcPy but since ArcGIS 10.1 you have been able to clone graphic and text elements. In the GraphicElement (arcpy.mapping) help there is code that shows you how to use cloning to: construct a graphic table based on data values from a table in the map document. If you are not keen on ...


10

I found the answer right after I asked the question. The Table of Contents lists Draw Order for layouts. You can select any map element in this draw order and change the order they draw in the layout.


9

On my suggestion (Feature #6988) it was Fixed in changeset 5aac8bbfe060502944b4b4cc3bfb00860b583e98. So now after hitting Set to map canvas extent in Print Composer / Item Properties / Extents the map in map frame is centered both horizontally and vertically (at this moment only in weekly builds of QGIS 2.1 - I have tested it and it works)


9

Here is one solution on top my head: Create a new string field and use field calculator to compute as the concatenation of other fields. Here is the python snippet: !abbrev! + ' ' + !fullname1! +' ('+ !fullname2! + ')' Copy the layer twice in the ArcMap TOC to have three versions of the same layer. Go to properties of each layer and fill the definition ...


9

I might have found a nice Python solution referring to the very shapefile in the question, so I am posting it for future reference. import networkx as nx import matplotlib.pyplot as plt G=nx.read_shp('C:\Users\MyName\MyFolder\TEST.shp') pos = {k: v for k,v in enumerate(G.nodes())} X=nx.Graph() #Empty graph X.add_nodes_from(pos.keys()) #Add nodes ...


8

You can do this in the Data Frame Properties for the inset window, under the Frame tab, use the Rounding setting. For a circle, just start with a square data frame and then set the rounding to 100%.


8

I think there are a couple of ways of looking at this question. You can see it from a pure mathematical and procedural standpoint of what factor do I multiply things by to change the size of this layout from small to large. Look at it from a cartographic standpoint. What does it mean to the layout, the look of the map, and the information you are ...


8

There are two separate toolbars that contain zooming tools, one of which zooms acts on the data: the other which works on the layout: You are likely using the layout view tools (or using the mouse wheel, which will use layout zoom while in layout view. You can either: stay in layout view and use the data layer zoom tools, or Switch to data view, zoom as ...


8

To my understanding it is not possible to have two different data frames each using data driven pages. However, there are methods/tricks you can employ to emulate this behavior by manipulating properties of the data frame. Specifically the Extent Indicator and Data Frame tabs of the Data Frame Properties dialog. For example, in the image above the same ...


8

R is pretty good at spatial processing, but its not a replacement carto tool (yet). Its graphics have always been implicitly geared to small, simple images and diagrams suitable for journal articles and the like. You can still do some neat things with packages like ggplot2 (perhaps with some extensions like ggmap and ggspatial), tmap, and mapview, but not ...


8

In qgis 2.99 there is the topological coloring processing tool that give you exactly that (it add a column so after using it you could use your data in earlier version of qgis)


7

You should use the layers Metadata for it. In the Layers properties, fill in Attribution - Title string like shown below (you may use the Url too, as well): Then insert the following expression into your label item (note the output preview in the screenshot and the arguments description of the layer_properties function on the right, you may access layer ...


6

The secret is to create multiple data frames. The image below shows six data frames, each with the same base imagery though different layers above that. Try the following steps: Set the page layout at File -> Page and Print Setup... Click on the default data frame in the layout so that it turns light blue Adjust the size of the first data frame to your ...


6

I was wondering about the same but found that there is no such out-of-the-box tool. I made an add-on for this. You can download it here: http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=a9b032f739254ebeb6221c9294ebc886


6

the two things you are asking for don't go together. If you want the layout it will ONLY have paper coordinates. If you want real world coordinates it will never know the orientation of your paper (or layout). The work around would be to get the data in the dataframe exported (using the export to cad function for each data layer you want in the drawing. (you ...


6

You'll likely want to use ExportToPDF (arcpy.mapping) to generate your individual PDFs. Then you can combine the individual PDF's using PDFDocumentCreate (arcpy.mapping). If you need help getting started with scripting, read Getting started with arcpy.mapping tutorial (arcpy.mapping) The code sample at the bottom of the page even shows you how to append ...


6

The approach you you mention does sounds unorthodox, it is, however, the only way you can do it in ArcGIS. It is actually more efficient doing this inside ArcMap as you suggest as oppose to a 3rd party image editing software outside of ArcMap. The benefit is that you don't have to post-process your cartography in a another application and it is therefore ...


6

One option that might help with resizing labels more easily to a new scale is to change the reference scale. Once you've fit your map to the new page, using the data frame properties, general tab, go to the bottom where it has a drop-down menu called 'reference scale', and select (or any more specific scale setting). this can be a pretty quick fix for ...


6

Try this: import arcpy from arcpy import env env.workspace = r"D:\desktop\Project" for mxdname in arcpy.ListFiles("*.mxd"): print mxdname mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(r"D:\desktop\Project\\" + mxdname) for elm in arcpy.mapping.ListLayoutElements(mxd, "TEXT_ELEMENT"): #fixed indent and replaced equality test. elm....


6

For best logo results, make sure you start with a PNG that has high pixel values, like 3500x3500 (if it's a square). Next, make sure you shrink that down to at most a couple inches. For export settings, set DPI to 600, and Image Compression to "LZW". Then export to PDF.


6

There is no Layout View in ArcScene. You can export your scene to JPG by using File > Export Scene > 2D... and selecting JPEG in the Save As Type drop-down of the Export Map dialog.


6

It's been removed, as a result of the map items now rendering in a background thread. (Because the map renders in the background, it no longer causes the "hangs" while rendering, so even for complex maps you can continue to work within the layout designer while the map renders away in the background).


5

Cast the IMxDocument.FocusMap to IActiveView and retrieve current extent from the Extent property. The map will always automatically modify its extent and other information when you switch from data frame view to the layout view (and back).


5

Make sure you're using the Layout View. Of the 3 little buttons under the map data window, the left is data (map) view, the middle is layout view - this is when the layout toolbar is active, the right is refresh.


5

I was able to copy the scale bar I wanted to use, activate the data frame I needed it for, then paste. The new one retains all the formatting of the old. You can then set aside or delete the old one.


5

OK, so the "Element Name" box appears to be the likely solution. This is non-intuitively placed in the "Size and Position" tab of the map layout element's properties dialog box.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible