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Inside an MPK you'll find an MXD and a fGDB. (You may find shapefiles, tiffs or other files depending on how the MPK was created, but odds are you'll find data in the fGDB). With this knowledge, if you have an application other than ArcGIS that can read MXDs and fGDB, you can simply unzip an MPK (using something like 7zip) to get at the contents. As for a ...


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Map Packages from ArcGIS 10.1 to ArcGIS 10.0 It is possible through the Package Map (Data Management) Version [Optional] Specifies the version of the geodatabases that will be created in the resulting package. Specifying a version allows packages to be shared with previous versions of ArcGIS and supports backward compatibility. ALL — Package will ...


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Layer File A Layer File (.lyr) is a file that stores the path to a source dataset and other layer properties, including symbology. Layer Package: A Layer Package encapsulates the data, cartography, and other properties of the layer as it's authored in ArcGIS into one easily shareable package Map Package: A Map Package contains a map document ...


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No, you shouldn't expect Add-ins to be included in a Map Package. Here's the description from the documentation: A map package contains a map document (.mxd) and the data referenced by the layers it contains, packaged into one convenient, portable file. Python Add-ins, however, are not part of the map itself, but instead extensions to the ArcMap ...


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In short, yes you are able to publish a vector tile map using ArcGIS Server as mentioned "Build and publish a vector tile package", "Is there a way to publish vector tiles to ArcGIS Server without Portal?" and "Prerequisites for creating a vector tile service" Subsequent releases will add the ability for the ArcGIS Runtime to consume vector tiles across ...


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A Map Package .mpk file is not data to be added to a map, which is why you can't see it using the Add Data dialog. It is a package containing different components that can make up your map including the mxd file. You can extract the contents to a folder and then open it in ArcMap.


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Take a look at this page: http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//0017000000q5000000 I gave you the 10.0 link based on your tag. # Name: PackageMap.py # Description: Find all the map documents that reside in a specified folder and create map packages for each map document. # import system modules import os import arcpy from arcpy ...


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A Map Package (mpk) will only hold 1 MXD, but could hold multiple GDBs. If your original MXD has 100 featureclasses from 5 different databases (multiple fGDB or SDE instances), the data that gets copied to the package will be held inside 5 GDBs named based on the original database. So to your point, you're sort of correct. Its more you'd have 400 MPKs if you ...


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Here is a script I wrote, based on the example Package Map (Data Management). It has a few changes you'd need to be aware of. It removes any rasters from the mxds and it sets the required Summary, Description & Tags to the name of the MXD. This will change your source files so be sure to back them up. It also just looks into a single directory and ...


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According the help of ESRI it should be possible. "Some datasets reference other datasets. For example, you may have a topology dataset that references four feature classes. Other examples of datasets that reference other datasets include Geometric Networks, Networks, and Locators. When consolidating or packaging a layer based on these types of datasets, the ...


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This has not been implemented yet. I asked the responsible team about this not long ago. It is on their to-do list. (I don't have access to their queue, thus I can't get a tracking number, nor can I speak to when it might be implemented.) For now, the only way to control package output is by using the Extract Package tool as you mention.


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How to create a map package - ArcGIS Runtime SDK for WPF Help Or did you mean programmatically? As @KHibma points out, map packages can only be created from Desktop, arcpy or ArcObjects, not the WPF Runtime.


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My understanding is that ArcMap is the tool for authoring packages. The purpose of a package is to encapsulate maps, layers, and geoprocessing tools that are to be consumed by Runtime. Runtime is not intended to be an authoring or package manipulation SDK. So ... ArcMap = Author, Runtime = consumer. That being said, packages are simply zip archives. You ...


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Try to run the Compact command on your geodatabase to see if that will remove some the files that are no longer in use. (From the ArcGIS online help, version 10.3) Compact (Data Management) Compacts a personal or file geodatabase. Compacting rearranges how the geodatabase is stored on disk, often reducing its size and improving performance. Usage It is ...


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My understanding is that Layer (*.lpk) and Map (*.mpk) packages can include a Geodatabase as a subset of their data which you can see by renaming it as a *.zip. I think that you should then be able to read any parts of that Geodatabase supported by the File Geodatabase API. To read the style information in a Layer (*.lyr) file or Map (*.mxd) document my ...


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I suspect your organization has disabled anonymous access, as such when you provide someone a link to a publicly shared item, you need to remove your org from the URL. I can access your item here: https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=9db9fc3ad0594fefa72798b71c0ff41e Note the lack of capeporal.maps in the URL. See this in the help Share public items ...


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An MPK is a Map Package, created in ArcMap. A MPKX can be created in ArcGIS Pro. They're basically the same thing, with the exception that a MPKX cannot be read by ArcMap, where the MPK can be read in ArcGIS Pro. An MMPK is a Mobile Map Package, and can only be created in ArcGIS Pro. It can be read back into ArcGIS Pro. The Map Package and Mobile Map ...


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This needs to be split into two parts: Only ArcGIS can edit map composition (.mxd) -- symbols, colours, labels, legend, embedded tables, etc., etc. -- and geoprocessing tools (.tbx). However the data can be edited by any program that understands the file formats inside the package, which can be any Esri supported filetype, most common are shapefile, file-...


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I would try the following: If you have v9.3 users trying view v10 map doc: Create v9.3 geodatabase and copy and paste features datasets/features classws in ArcCatolog from geodatabase 10 to 9.3 (have not tested this). Then resource your v10 mxd layers to v9.3 geodatabase data, and finally Save as Copy of v10 mxd to v9.3 mxd. Create layer package in v10 ...


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This is very easily done by adding each of these data sources to a map and then Creating a map package: Map packages (.mpk) make it easy to share complete map documents with others. A map package contains a map document (.mxd) and the data referenced by the layers it contains, packaged into one convenient, portable file. The same functionality is ...


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I'm going to provide a slight variation to @Willis answer. They suggested a solution which requires storing your photos in the anticipated folder location of a map package. Whilst this appears to be the only solution I don't like it as ..\commondata\userdata is not a folder structure used by my organization. I wonder if anyone actually uses these folder ...


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The solution was to include the photos as additional files when creating the map package, and setting the hyperlinks to the anticipated relative path (here it was ..\commondata\userdata, as discussed in the ArcMap help on laying out relative hyperlinks) in the extracted *.mpk folder.


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A .pkinfo file is an xml file that hold the Arcgis online unique map id hash. For example, this AGOL map has the id 2f382d5fcdb748deba89e6104b59551d The Open in Arcgis Desktop option downloads a pkinfo file locally, and this is what it reads: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?><pkinfo><ID>...


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A map package cannot be uploaded directly to Online and be published as a layer. If you open the map package in Pro or ArcMap you can publish the contents to ArcGIS Online as a feature layers and tile layers and then you can use those layers in map viewer, scene viewer or custom apps using WAB or JSAPI.


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DISCLAIMER: I have not actually done this, this is just based on Googling your question. But I may be able to help until someone who knows better comes along. Also I am assuming that the Map Package is a .mpk file (Thanks @Houska). First of all make a backup of the Map Package. Change the extension of the file from .mpk to .zip and unzip it. It should ...


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I'm assuming it's a MPK file, which is a container that should hold a number of files that together fully describe the ArcGIS mapping project in a transferable way. You should be able to open the .mpk with a ZIP file utility and extract the components. The map layers should be inside as (f)GDB files which can probably just be opened with QGIS, or if that ...


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You've used the UI to create the package (File menu). The UI way of creating packages is pretty simple. It creates a package that ensures will open in the oldest version of the software that reads packages, as well as the current version. Current version is obviously important because there might be something that only exists in the new version and you want ...


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To unpack a map package, you should be able to just right click the .mpk in ArcCatalog and click "Unpack". You shouldn't need an ArcInfo (Advanced license), using the right click method in ArcCatalog or the Extract Package tool is available for ArcView (basic), ArcEditor (standard), and ArcInfo (advanced) licenses. http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10....


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Map Packages don't work with Runtime SDK's. The Runtime SDK's at quartz support Mobile Map Packages created with ArcGIS Pro. You can import your *.mxd file into ArcGIS Pro and create a mobile map package, but you will need to use ArcGIS Runtime SDK for .NET Quartz.


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Settings in ArcGIS Pro seem to be more project based than application based, so I doubt there would be a setting like the ArcMap one. As most tasks in ArcGIS Pro are run from geoprocessing tools, I imagine the geodatabase or locations specified in Environments would be used for any/all geoprocessing tasks, including the Extract Package tool.


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