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6

you can use the processing tool "multiparts to singleparts" before: this will convert the multipolygon (the green one) into single polygons which you can join/merge afterwards.


4

I've just written this which I think will safely rename the geometry column by changing the names element and then setting the geometry column with st_geometry - which will affect the sf_column attribute. rename_geometry <- function(g, name){ current = attr(g, "sf_column") names(g)[names(g)==current] = name st_geometry(g)=name g }...


3

There is another option to get rid of the gaps between to polygons. Use the tool Snap geometries to layer form processing toolbox. The trick is to find optimal settings: if tolerance is too high, the tool will affect the polygon boundaries too much, if you set the tolerance too small, you will be left with too many gaps left. First, open your shapefile and ...


3

Here the updated answer/solution to my question (in detail): Merging the polygons was not working because of topology errors in my shapefile (in my case these errors were due to slivers/gaps between polygons). There seem to be several methods in QGIS (and GRASS) one can use to tackle topology errors, but the following worked best for me: I removed those ...


3

After multipart to singlepart as @eurojam suggested, you may select all green areas smaller than 1 sqkm by pasting the expression $area<1000000 into the select by expression dialogue. Your green layer has to use a m-based CRS in order for this to work properly. You then may merge the selected green areas with the other layer as you see fit.


2

This approach uses the Walk function in the arcpy site package to recursively find and gather feature classes from a directory. Once a list of feature classes is generated, it merges the featureclasses. import arcpy import os # Define the workspace where all the file geodatabases are located workspace = r'C:\temp' # Define the path of the output merged ...


2

I suggest trying "Dissolve" first. Select those adjoining areas then go to 'Vector'-> 'Geoprocessing Tools' -> 'Dissolve'. Choose your farm boundaries feature, check 'Selected features only', run it. You can then run 'Merge' as you mentioned in your original question.


2

I do not know if there is a way to do it in one step. However, as workaround, you can use the memory layer option for your first processing tool which will be saved temporarily and you can use this memory layer in the second processing tool. res1= processing.run("native:difference", {'INPUT':blue, 'OVERLAY':grid, 'OUTPUT':'TEMPORARY_OUTPUT'}) ...


1

The error in the saga is probably due to spaces and accents in folder names. So copy to the root (D: /) and run again.


1

Kind of late to answer this, but I have been working on a web tool that does exactly that: https://gotoes.org/strava/Combine_GPX_TCX_FIT_Files.php It can ingest GPX, TCX, and FIT files, and output the same. You get various options, including the ability to repair points (you can drag them along a map). Also, it can repair some types of corrupted FIT files ...


1

Downloading your data and merging the selected features as in your screenshot, I got the same sliver polygons/gaps. To get rid of them in an easy way, I applied a buffer of 0.005 m (so that all gaps are covered), than I applied again a buffer, this time of -0.005 m to get to outer boundary back in place. See the screenshot: the resulting layer with polygons ...


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