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I had this same problem. I solved my problem by writing a utility in C. It expects a KML with all your path segments in proper order and only segments to be merged. It will flip segments as required for a best fit, producing a KML with the combined path. It can be found on Github at the URL below. https://github.com/mgemeny/KMLpathMerge I hope this helps,...


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You can do it but not with just one tool. You can create a model with the following process: Merge vector layers. Use the plugin: 'Dissolve with stats' and make sum. This will join all the value and, in this case, if you have a value of 2 means that the species is within both polygons. Notice that this 'Dissolve with stats' tool can't make sum with null ...


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With the QGIS > Vector general > Merge vector layers tool I recently ran into a similar issue (missing or ´NULL´ed attributes in the resulting merged layer). As a solution I recommend using the SAGA > Vector general > Merge vector layers tool: It has additional options for adding source information and matching fields by name:


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Using turf.js#intersect method you can find out if two features share a border. from their docs: Takes two polygons and finds their intersection. If they share a border, returns the border; if they don't intersect, returns undefined. Using this, you can convert open layer features to turf.js#polygonand feed them to the intersect method. If the return ...


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You can select the geometries on front end using openlayers and then write a postgres query to check if they intersect with each other by using ST_Intersects and apply ST_UNION if the intersects is true. This works if the backend is postgres. If you use any other DB, use appropriate spatial queries and return the result to front-end for providing appropriate ...


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1) No, not the exact number. 2) No, order does not matter. 3) Yes, common field names & types are necessary for values to transfer from the source shapefiles into the resultant merged shapefile. For instance: Shape1 has a name field of NAME (text) Shape2 has a name field of TextID (text) Both: Have an attribution field of EditorID (text) When merged, ...


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You could try iterating the list and appending each shapefile to a target. It may be that one of the shapefiles is corrupt and this could help you isolate the problem child. # assign first item as target target = list_of_paths[0] print("target - {}".format(target)) # iterate over remaining files, appending each one to target for shp in list_of_paths[1:]: ...


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Ahh - the dreaded 'unexpected' error. My first try would be to save this into a file GDB. Based on what you say you shouldn't exceed the shapefile size limits but maybe some temp file is. For other ideas see: ESRI 999999 error ideas


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I tried this solution of mosaicing to a folder instead of FGDB, it worked for some of my projects but still had gaps in others. After further experimentation, I found that recalculating the pyramids to 0 for all the raster tiles first, then mosaic to new raster, was successful in creating the full mosaic without gaps. Possibly a combination of this plus ...


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I'd suggest one of two approaches: Split your mosaic operation into several steps and then mosaic the mosaics. I've done this before. Build a model in ModelBuilder and use the mosaic tool (not mosaic as new raster) and then copy the raster making sure to overwrite the original name. This will have the effect of accumulating the values.


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