4

You'll need a Standard or higher license for this method. Create a buffer feature class from your centerlines with a 5 foot buffer distance. Then use the Snap tool. Your points are your input features. Your centerline buffers are your snap features. Use Edge as your type.


3

If the field holding your dates are of date data type, then: Add a text field Use Field Calculator to write year and month to the field, see for example: How To: Extract a portion of the Date field Split By Attributes using the field as Split_Fields (If the field is already text and year-month then all you need is Split By Attributes) With Split By ...


2

Unfortunately, the code produced by converting from ModelBuilder to Python script is not guaranteed to run and is difficult to debug for beginners. That is why performing each step from its tool dialog and using Copy As Python Snippet to paste into a new script is an easier way to learn ArcPy. Copy As Python Snippet is documented in the ArcGIS Help and ...


2

To specify the output you'll want to use either arcpy.SetParameter() or arcpy.SetParameterAsText() depending if you want to output an object or return text. I am guessing you want to use the filename of your merged feature class so I would add the following line to the end of your script: arcpy.SetParameterAsText(1, 'merge_result') Also, check this answer:...


2

Slight variation of 2 other solutions. Use Near tool (location) on your points and buffer. Calculate Shape field using calculator (Python): arcpy.Point( !NEAR_X!, !NEAR_Y!) Note: this will modify original shapes, so create a copy first. Difference with Snap tool - you don't need to guess distance, and generate near table looks like unnecessary complication....


2

You can use Select By Location in Modelbuilder but not the one in Selection menu. Instead go to ArcToolBox - Data Management Tools - Layers and Table Views - Select Layer By Location. Or menu Geoproccessing - Search for Tools and type Select Layer by Location


2

The Set Null tool takes the following parameters: SetNull (in_conditional_raster, in_false_raster_or_constant, {where_clause}) which are described in the tool's documentation as follows: in_conditional_raster: Input raster representing the true or false result of the desired condition. It can be of integer or floating point type. ...


1

Although if-else statements are not as user-friendly as they should be in Modelbuilder, Esri did develop the 'If Field Value Is' tool to do this kind of logical selection. Esri Document on 'If Value is' tool


1

You can use "generate near table" and then recalculate the geometry to move them. test this on a copy of your data as I'm typing this process from memory right now With Generate Near Table: "input feature" is your points. "Near feature" is a 5 foot buffer of your lines (alternatively you could use copy parallel to create new lines that are 5 feet on either ...


1

This is an arcpy solution rather than a ModelBuilder one but I believe it is pretty straightforward. To run it you just have to open the Python console in ArcMap and paste the following lines: import arcpy # specify the path to your GDB arcpy.env.workspace = 'path/name.gdb' # get all the Feature Classes in the GDB fcs = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() # run ...


1

You are correct. The If Field Exists tool is a tool that is in ArcGIS Pro but not available for ArcMap. If you need to do something similar then a workaround is documented in the ArcMap help as Using If-Then-Else logic for branching, and it is the subject of at least one Q&A here: Using Python Script tool in ModelBuilder to check if field exists, if ...


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