14

Note there are two ways of doing this. The way you are going about doing it is the long way but that is the way I am going to show how to do it here. The other way is by just going to Add Vector Layer and then selecting file and then browsing to where your .mdb file is located and opening the .mdb file. First, you need to make sure QGIS 32 bit version is ...


9

It's possible to connect via ODBC. In windows, start the ODBC Administrator and define your Datasource (Microsoft Access Driver). In QGIS go to Layer/Add Layer/Vector Layer/database: Type=ODBC. Set up a new Connection. Host should be "localhost" if your database is local on your machine. Database Name is the same name you defined before in the ODBC ...


8

With the new "Processing" tools available in QGIS 2, this becomes a bit easier. While I have still not found a way to "live-link" the data (so that if you change the values in the MS Access table, the point moves automatically), this method seems to work pretty well. Credit goes to "Christina" and "Bernd" in the comments section of this page (and of course ...


7

The ArcGIS 10.1 Help indicates that you cannot edit the attributes of Excel or MS Access files, added through an Ole DB connection, because they have no ObjectID field. You can Copy the data to a fGDB table and then edit it. Or you can script Python to edit the native MS formats.


7

Check it with odbc and search if database contain table starting with GDB_ import pyodbc db_file = "C:/path/to/my/database/MyDataBase.mdb" user = '' password = '' odbc_conn_str = 'DRIVER={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb)};DBQ=%s;UID=%s;PWD=%s' % \ (db_file, user, password) cnxn = pyodbc.connect(odbc_conn_str) cursor = cnxn.cursor() if cursor....


6

Postgres configuration By default the Postgres server is only accessible from the same computer it runs on. You need to setup the Postgres server to listen not just locally, but on your internet facing network card too. This is done in the postgresql.conf configuration file. You will also need to enable user authentication from the outside, which is done ...


6

Personal geodatabases--really anything with Access--have a ton of limitations. File geodatabases permit up to 65,534 fields per table/feature class. It should be no problem to import your existing data to a file geodatabase and then make the changes/additions that you need.


4

The thing to do these days would probably be to link to a map on ArcGIS Online. You could do this by providing a hyperlink to the Webmap viewer, https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?... It should be possible to pass parameters to set the center and scale of the map in the URL, see the documentation for more details. A variation could be to embed a ...


4

You can use an Access table, but it is recommended you only use it through an OLE DB connection in order to maintain the data integrity. Don't consider a Personal Geodatabase and a non-spatial MDB file to be exactly the same. ArcGIS manages the data in a personal geodatabase, but you don't want it to manage the data in your tabular file. You can use ...


3

You should be able to use the Copy Features Tool on the layer with your selection, as long as the out_feature_class parameter is set to the path on disk of where you want the shapefile to be written out it should just work.


3

Here's the thing. Windows 64 bit stores the 64 bit odbcad.exe in the System32 folder. The one in the location that you're editing, c:\windows\syswow64\odbcad32.exe, is actually the 32 bit one. Hilarious right? 32 bit applications in the syswow64 folder, 64 bit applications in the System32 folder! There are reasons though. Now, for QGIS, add the ODBC driver ...


3

No, the assumption was not correct (ArcObjects is calling the Access function, so there should be no difference). However: Access-based geodatabases are "old school", with limitations in size and capability; their use has been greatly de-emphasized of late, especially in light of the deprecation of PGDB support on 64-bit platforms (no ArcGIS Server or Pro) ...


3

This should work: ##Database=group ##Access.mdb to SqLite=name ##inputmdb= input file ##outputsqlite = output file import sys, subprocess, os, sqlite3 as sql mdb_name = inputmdb sql_name = outputsqlite try: print "\nopening db" conn = sql.connect(sql_name) curs = conn.cursor() print "\ncreating schema" cmds = subprocess.Popen(["mdb-...


3

Short awnser: you need to use dynamic DNS on your home router. I use DtDNS because they offer five free hostnames. you need to forward 5432 port on your router to your local debian server.


3

button in Access could first write a text file with ID of data set and then launch QGIS. QGIS is started with initial script which reads the text file and does all the rest. .... cd H:\test start "QGIS" /B "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%"\bin\qgis-bin.exe --code external_id.py .... It seems the file you want to be executed needs to be in current folder. Before starting ...


3

Different geodatabase sources require different types of date queries. Take a look at this help page that shows how to form a proper date query in various geodatabases, for example an access database: Personal geodatabase Dates in personal geodatabases are delimited using a pound sign (#). For example: [Datefield] = #mm-dd-yyyy hh:mm:ss# ...


3

Just use the 'Table to Excel' tool, Access will happily use that format and this tool give you more option (like exporting alias as field name or choosing between code or description for domain) Take care of the number of row limitation : The input cannot exceed the 65535 rows limit of the .xls file format


3

You are half way there. In windows you will need to setup the ODBC connection to the database file though windows built in odbc manager. If it's an access database you may need to install the free ms access database engine. If you have ms office it might already be installed. Once you have done that the connection should work in qgis.


2

Use a Web Browser Control on your Access form. Then set the Control Source to (for example, using a text box on my form called txtTotalShops and a field called Address1) ="https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/staticmap&zoom=7&size=600x300&maptype=roadmap&markers=color:orange%7Clabel:" & [txtTotalShops] & "%7C" &...


2

You're adding a layer "FC" to your map which should be "FL" or "LAN". Either the feature layer or the layer should work. Be aware that the map may be in data view instead of layout view in which case pMxDoc.PageLayout is incorrect... I can't tell what pLayout is as it's not defined in the code block. It would be safer to use IMXDocument.FocusMap as this ...


2

Within a QGIS project, you can add layers from as many SQLite and spatialite databases as you want. Keeping the folder paths relative, it should be easy to exchange database and project files with other people working with it. It should be no problem to replace one database with an updated one (of the same name and data structure), and work on with the ...


2

Try uninstalling QGIS-64 bit and re-install QGIS-32 bit. Then try the odbc link. This trick worked for me, I think that QGIS-64 is looking in the wrong folder (the system32 folder) for the ODCB link. Using QGIS-32 will cause it to look in the SysWOW64 folder.


2

I think a less intrusive method is to convert your queries into make table queries which could write the output back into the Access database or maybe another. Your MXD could then connect to these tables using OLE. If you needed to do some extra processing may be wrap them up in a macro? If you wrap up your processing steps in a macro then the macro can be ...


2

Sorry, Eva, but that is not possible in a easy way: gvSIG is a desktop software, so it has no webs service to share your project or views. On the other hand, I can advise you some solutions depending on what you really need: Static information: Export your views as image or PDF. Share a layer: You can export your layer as KML and load it in google Maps or ...


2

I recommend you research Microsoft Sql Server Express because it supports Spatial data as a native datatype. ArcGIS supports read/write to Sql Server Express. You have the full power of T-SQL at your disposal, allowing you to mix and match Attribute queries with Spatial queries, join tables, create views, index data, backup data. The scripting in Sql Server ...


2

Walter: the HUD data uses ID's for the blockgroups (BLKGRP) with single quotes around them... the TIGER blockgroup ID's (GEOID) do not have single quotes: I would say that you should create a new column using Excel / Open Office to truncate the first and last values from the field into the new column...but I can't remember how to do that right now!!! Once ...


2

It's counter intuitive, but I'd try using the PostgreSQL ANSI driver even for reading UTF-8 database. It often works where the Unicode one fails. Though in theory Access 2010 should not have this problem. Have you verified that the data looks okay via pgAdmin. It's possible the encoding of the file was not LATIN1 and might be win1252 or something else.


2

According to the Microsoft support page Which Access File Format should I use?, the .accdb format doesn't support user-level security, which means there's no way to control which users can access particular tables. A related question on StackOverflow (MS Access: securing tables from unauthorized access) also has an answer with a comment providing anecdotal ...


2

To export all data within the mdb file, first add them to a mxd (map) and then save the mxd and use "Map to kml" tool. To export only one feature class use "Layer to Kml" tool.


2

This is more a comment than an answer.... Converted it with FME workbench (safesoftware) is a 15mb.kmz can add styles to the layers too. the data was a personal geodatabase (.mdb).


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible