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13

The primary industry that uses this is the real estate industry, and planning and government. The TRS system is the basis for the legal descriptions that describe the locations of land parcels in most of the United States. Legal Description - Wikipedia There are a number of ways that the bounds of a land parcel may be described, but at some point, whether ...


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Like several other states, Texas and New York are not part of the Public Land Survey System (PLSS), that's why data for those states don't appear at the page you linked to. Neither state has townships, ranges, or sections of the type you need, those types of areas are found inside the boundaries of the PLSS. New York has townships, but those are not the same ...


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ArcGIS Snap tool will do this for you (standard and up license level). You need to fill in what type of snapping you are looking for in the Type column. Also the Distance of the snapping. Also keep in mind this is a tool with no outputs, so make copies of your input data before trying.


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There are a number of industries that use PLSS data. Russell mentions the Real Estate market, but also the Energy/Resources and Utilities industries as well. In my current applications we provide interfaces for companies to report to us the location of assets/resources based on their Township/Range/Section/Quarter/QuarterQuarter as many areas do not have a ...


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I recommend mapping the XY coordinates using QGIS. This will create a Point shapefile. There are many posts about how to do this. Next, if don't have the landgrid shapefile containing Township/Range/Section data, it should be easy to find on the Internet, search for "State Name" GIS data. Finally, Intersect the two shapefiles using QGIS. Each Point should ...


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There is no tool, CRS, or projection you can use to solve this issue. As I mentioned in my comment, the problem is not a function of projection of the data, but rather the way the data itself was created. When the PLSS grid was originally laid out they were supposed to be square and equal size. However this was done in the 1800s with survey equipment and ...


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As Michael alludes to in a comment, this notation is related to the Dominion Land Survey (Canada) in your case, or the Public Land Survey System (United States) in mine, which the DLS is based on. Those systems are nested series of grids whose top level of reference are principal meridians and baselines. Because of the way the system is set up and numbered, ...


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Goto navigator.blm.gov . This has the PLSS data for many of the States in US https://navigator.blm.gov/data?keyword=PLSS&fs_publicRegion=Colorado


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The prime meridian passes through Greenwich, but how many meridians are there to be the 5th of? In reality the could be a great many but I think they are referring to the Fifth Principal Meridian


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Legal plans (plats) and legal descriptions are not in any projection (grid) system; they are on a local, ground-based plane. Hence the need for grid-to-ground and ground-to-grid conversions. As a minimum, there are usually scaling and rotation issues to deal with. So, it is quite possible that neither GIS nor legal description are wrong. Once we get more ...


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I've developed tools for petroleum landmen that allow them to create polygons of leases based on PLSS legal descriptions in a spreadsheet. The first tool lives within Excel and is used to export legal descriptions of leases from the spreadsheet into an xml file. The workbook contains VBA which references a data transfer class. The class is written in .NET ...


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The state BLM office pages often have a version of the data. Colorado for example. However I've found that version may or may not match the one on Geocommunicator - as the data stewards the state version may be more up to date / recently revised (and I've seen the reverse too, where the communicator version was more recent than the state's). This page lists ...


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There are a couple of ways to go about it I think. COGO is one way. It stands for "coordinate geometry" and is essentially a suite of tools designed specifically around digitizing parcels such as you're describing. Wha'ts nice is you can have a whole table put together of bearings and distances, which minimizes the possibility of error. Unfortunately, the ...


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As suggested by @Erica, COGO tools are what I would ideally use for this type of work. However, being limited to a Basic License, COGO tools in ArcMap are not available to me. I found this blog explaining a workaround for such a situation. It explains how to adjust your editing tools so that you can do what I mentioned above: "type in those numbers and ...


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I was able to come up with an accurate means of achieving my desired results by creating a line FC with two features. One that follows the Southern line of the section polygon and another that follows the Western line of the section polygon. Using the offsets given by the survey, I put buffers around each line with the corresponding survey offsets and then ...


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Yes, PLSS townships have names. For example, T10N R3R in Shelby County Illinois is "Lakewood Township". Most shapefiles of PLSS townships don't include these names, but they do show up on USGS topo maps. You can find a more detailed description of the Township/Range/Section PLSS system here. Various websites offer ways to search by location and get Section,...


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You could try datagateway.nrcs.usda.gov. The Geospatial Data Gateway (GDG) provides access to a map library of over 100 high resolution vector and raster layers in the Geospatial Data Warehouse. It is the One Stop Source for environmental and natural resources data, at any time, from anywhere, to anyone. It allows you to choose your area of interest, ...


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You can download the latest Cadnsdi Land grid from each State. The Geocommunicator Site from the BLM has older data. This grid data is normally in the ESRI File Geodatabase format. You can query the FirstDivision layer (Sections) on PLSSID to reference your descriptions. For example, PLSSID = 'WY060400N0710W0'.


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I solved the issue. I figured out that I could create a line layer from the State provided PLSS polygon layer. To removed extra vertices from the line layer: I merged all lines, planerized all lines, then generalized all lines with a tolerance smaller than that of the shortest section line. Then I used the "snap" tool (making sure to select the "vertices" ...


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You can download the current WA/OR Cadnsdi Nodes from BLM as a Point layer called PLSSPoints. If you still require the old Points, there are 3 ways to align the old to the new data. Snap the old Points to the new Points. Spatial Join the old Points to the new Points. Attribute join the old to the new Points by PointID, such as "OR330160S0082E0_600300"


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I added tileGrid: new ol.tilegrid.createXYZ({ tileSize: [2500, 2500] }) into my source and no more duplicate labels. mapPLSSTownshipLayer = new ol.layer.Tile({ extent: [-13884991, 2870341, -7455066, 6338219], source: new ol.source.TileArcGISRest({ url: 'https://gis.blm.gov/arcgis/rest/services/Cadastral/BLM_Natl_PLSS_CadNSDI/MapServer/...


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The latest data is generally the most accurate, but you have to realize that some of those corner locations were originally established using a wagon wheel to measure distance, and a Gurley Transit, or Compass to establish line. Maybe a sunshot was taken along the way. 20 feet of error between original corners is nothing. Reading some of the survey notes, ...


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I've had to do something similar and opted to use the BLM GIS Rest Service. You can create a URL and the service will respond back with the coordinates. Unfortunately you can only send about 25 PLSS descriptions at a time due to the constraints of how long a URL can be. So, I created a list of URLs and used wget to batch process them. Here is an example ...


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There is no formula/equation to convert from the PLSS to lat/lon. The PLSS is a reference grid, not a coordinate system (and note that it doesn't cover the entire US). To automate this, you would need to generate (or find - I don't know if one is out there) a coordinate lookup table for a script to reference or to use in a join. Your lookup table would need ...


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You can send a text file to BLM for batch processing. http://www.geocommunicator.gov/Geocomm/lsis_home/townshipdecoder/index.htm


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This may not be the quickest way to solve the problem, but if these coordinates are relative to the BLM section, you could place them at the BLM section and then move each point individually using basic editor tools in ArcMap (see: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/relative_to_its_current_location_delta_x_y/01m80000002t000000/). ...


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I am not aware of any tools similar to Ian's that have been written for QGIS (in fact all the tools I know of including commercial are specifically for ArcGIS). His script is written in Python though it does use arcpy, and his source and process description are pretty thorough. You might contact him via his blog (or he may chime in, he's on here) and he ...


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Like Chris W mentioned, http://datagateway.nrcs.usda.gov/, is another resource option for PLSS data. IIRR NRCS pulls a copy from Geocommunicator/BLM, stores and distributes it through the datagateway. Couple things to note, on the datagateway main page, don't use the PLSS download link to the left under browse by subject. It's take you to the ...


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Here is what I've come up with so far that seems to be doing the job I intended it to do. import arcpy, math, os, sys from arcpy import env # Getting parameters from tool properties excelFile = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) outputFileLoc = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(1) outputFile = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(2) YYYYMMDD = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(3) ############...


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Just found one right after I posted this. http://www.blm.gov/nm/st/en/prog/more/geographic_sciences/spatial_data_metadata.html Followed the link for "Survey LandNet" which is a download for very detailed survey data.


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