11

The syntax problem is most likely caused be the spaces in column names. If you double-click the column names in field calculator, they will most certainly be added with quotation marks, e.g. "Catt Pop" + "Buff Pop"


10

One of the best gridded data sets is CIESIN's Gridded Population. See http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/gpw/aboutus.jsp#aboutTable for more details. The best resolution is 30 Arc seconds.


8

You can download Census Blocks from TIGER; you'll just have to download the data on a state-by-state basis and merge it all together. EDIT: See this page for block-level shapefiles that already have the population and housing unit counts attached, so you don't have to deal with joining SF1 tables!


7

This is actually more tricky then it sounds! Are you aware that the boundaries have changed quite considerably over the period (not least the 1974 boundary changes - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Government_Act_1972)? Fortunately the nice people at the University of Portsmouth have done quite a lot of the leg work for you (http://www.visionofbritain....


7

There are two aspects to this question, future growth and fire station siting. Firstly, lets look at future growth. You can use the Census 2010 data in conjunction with the ACS data to attempt to spot recent trends in growth. The ACS data must be treated carefully and in many cases is not directly comparable to the Census data - see the Census ACS guidance ...


7

This can be accomplished with an Intersect, followed by a Field Calculate, and then finally a Summary Statistics. Make sure that your buffer feature class has a unique ID field. Before getting started, you will need to add a field (name Polygon_Areas, type Double) to your population polygon feature class, and then field calculate it, using Shape_Area as the ...


6

From the US Census http://www.census.gov/popclock/ it appears to be updated by the second.


6

Ensure that your polygons have an area attribute separate from the one that is/may be automatically updated by the software when the shape is edited. Intersect your buffer and polygon layer. In the resulting layer, open the attribute table. If there is a new/correct area field in the same units as the original area field from step 1 you can use that - ...


5

LandScan might be another alternative. The dataset has 20,880 rows and 43,200 columns covering North 84 degrees to South 90 degrees and West 180 degrees to East 180 degrees. The dataset has a spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and is output in a geographical coordinate system - World Geodetic System (WGS) 84 datum. The 30 arc-second cell, or ...


5

The short answer is: no, but it might be the best you can do without additional layers. The problem is that humans do not settle evenly. If all you have is populations of cities then IDW might be your best approximation, because population density does decay the further you go from the center of a city (as IDW models). However, population does not decay ...


5

You need the cartogram3 plugin - once installed simply select your layer and press the button. You can then style it like any other layer.


4

You can get population data from Geonames. Not sure about the source of the population data, although it seems that such data coincides with Wikipedia's population data, which is from 2011. You would also need to validate that there are more than 600.000 Indian villages in Geonames. Regarding an automated way, you could follow this tutorial by Tim ...


4

If I understood you correctly, you can use a function that joins polygons by location. I did this in QGIS using Join by location but there should be an equivalent function in ArcGIS. I made a simple example with 2 polygons: "House" and "Noise". The House polygon touches all 3 noise levels from the Noise layer: I then used the Join by location function and ...


4

@Joseph is correct with the join, but you may want to convert the polygons to lines first, as you have said each facade is effected differently, as this will show which facade is experiencing the greatest impact. With each facade as a line, then you can do the join. Make sure you have a unique building ID which is propagated to the line segments. With the ...


3

You might find the TIGER page helpful in finding information. For instance, this shapefile purports to contain basic demographic information by 2010 Census Tract. There are other types of information you might find interesting as well. If you want to find your own Census Tracts, you can use this user interface, known as the American FactFinder to find your ...


3

You should be able to use the method you were describing above, but create your vector layer using the 'vector grid' tool under the vector>research tools menu. This has a checkbox to align the extents and resolution of the vector grid to a raster layer, so should give you a perfect match with your original raster, and also remember to check the option to ...


3

I believe you would have to create a new column and input the command to calculate what you are wanting. You could try the following: case when "DNAME_2006" IN ('MASINDI') THEN ("Area_1" / "AREA") * "Population" END UPDATE: Unfortunately, I don't think you can do a simple SUM using the Field Calculator. However, there are a couple of other methods you ...


3

Let's pin down the workflow conceptually, then determine how to do it. I understand the input data consist of A vector point layer of total population, one point per Census unit; A vector (or raster) polygon layer representing the Census units; and A raster layer of housing density. The output needs to be a corresponding raster layer of estimated ...


3

If you need a gridded data set CIESIN's Gridded Population datasets may be of use. See http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/gpw/aboutus.jsp#aboutTable for more details. The best resolution is 30 Arc seconds.


3

Try reformatting the file so it's columns instead of rows (im assuming this is how the attribute data is organised in the Shapefile?) make sure the field names: Don't contain spaces Are less than 64 characters Special characters (stick to letters) Arc doesn't like these. Now what you want to do here is use the 'Add Join' function (located in the Data ...


3

As the comment above said; you need to open the properties of your layer (either double click it or right click it and choose properties), go to Style tab, and change from Single Symbol to Graduated. Then you choose the attribute you want to use in the drop down, choose a colour gradient and press Classify. However, if your attribute is the wrong data type (...


3

Have you ever looked at all the data provided by the European Union and its member states? Such as eurostat or inspire geoportal? Within eurostat you will find a page on population density which will help you in your quest...but you will likely have to do some manipulation bringing together several products to create what you are looking for. Like download ...


3

Population is an estimate, as it stands, so I'm assuming you are looking for a 'best-guess' type of workflow that will give the best results for the littlest amount of time spent. ArcGIS's Tabulate Intersection tool may be of interest to you. You can input two polygons (flood zone and population block groups, for example) and tabulate what percentage of ...


3

The OECD defines it as follows: The difference between the size of the population at the end and the beginning of a period. It is equal to the algebraic sum of natural increase and net migration (including corrections). There is negative change when both of these components are negative or when one is negative and has a higher absolute value than the ...


2

Census.gov ->geography-> tiger data-> choose 2010 then use Web interface to download what you need, that is for shape files, for demographics you need to use the fact finder also on census website


2

OK, so you have points representing the centroids of the zip codes, but not the full boundaries of the zip codes themselves, right? I'm not sure how you would go about this in Ruby, and I think this may be more processing than you want to do, but a common way to do this in GIS software would be Voroni Polygons (http://www.georeference.org/doc/...


2

You can use context property of OpenLayers.Style object and inside context to define needed function. For example: options = { div: "map", layers: [new OpenLayers.Layer.OSM()], center: [9317951, 7046625], zoom: 10 } map = new OpenLayers.Map(options); style = new OpenLayers.Style( OpenLayers.Util.extend( OpenLayers.Feature.Vector....


2

As I have said in my comment, you will not get the layers with 2011 census information. However village layer with 2001 census information are available from Survey of India at a fixed price. I have also found some data at this link: https://archive.org/details/IndiaVillageBoundaries I cannot vouch for its heritage, completeness or accuracy, but what ...


2

The Select Layer by Attribute tool applies a selection to a layer. However, your Copy Features tool is copying the entire "plano_tract" dataset, and not the "plano_tract_lyr" layer which has the selection applied. Here's the revised code: #user selects tract, Select by Attribute tool runs arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management("plano_tract", "plano_tract_lyr") ...


2

I would use one of the three spatial analyst overlay methods. These include: weighted overlay, weighted sum and fuzzy overlay. Weighted overlay is very intuitive and would likely be a good choice for your analysis. As you can see, the analysis is intuitive and useful (Source ESRI): Additional Resources: Overlay analysis approaches Weighted Overlay How ...


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