9

A great place to start is the PRISM Climate Group. There you can download data in gridded (i.e. text data) or image formats. Other sources include: http://www.worldclim.org/current http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/ http://gis.ncdc.noaa.gov/geoportal/catalog/main/home.page (search for precipitation) If you happen to have rain gauge data, here is a nice ...


6

What you need to do to create a continuous surface representing precipitation is a process called interpolation. ArcMap has a number of tools to do this, based on a variety of statistical and sampling approaches. I'd recommend inverse distance weighting (IDW) as a starting point, because it's one of the simplest to use. The input for IDW is a single feature ...


5

For reliable methods, I would do a literature review to find the best option given your time, resources and questions you are trying to accomplish. This one, so far, is popping out


5

Yes, I would use ArcHydro. I found a document on this page (updated link thanks to @Polygeo) a while ago, that outlines some possible workflows (from the ArcHydro Team). There have been some changes compared to ArcMap 10.0 so for me it was quite useful.


5

This post explains how to do that for months. Here it is adapted for days: var gsmap = ee.ImageCollection('JAXA/GPM_L3/GSMaP/v6/operational') .select(['hourlyPrecipRate']) .filterDate('2015-01-01', '2016-01-01'); var days = ee.List.sequence(1, 365); var composites = ee.ImageCollection.fromImages(days.map(function(d) { var filtered = gsmap....


4

The PRISM Climate Group's data is exceptional. Their raster products include precipitation, max temp, min temp, dewpoint and historic data. NASA's MODIS site has a wealth of data as does this USGS site. You will find a wide range of products there from vegetation indices to emissivity and burn data.


4

The WorldClim dataset has a lot of the data you want. It is free for non-commercial use and has interpolated 1 km resolution data on: average monthly mean temperature (°C * 10) average monthly minimum temperature (°C * 10) average monthly maximum temperature (°C * 10) average monthly precipitation (mm)


4

for rainfall you can download the TRMM datasets: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/


4

ArcGIS cannot work with TRMM data, however you can download the TRMM data in the NetCDF format which is supported by ArcGIS. From Esri Help: NetCDF (network Common Data Form) is a file format for storing multidimensional scientific data (variables) such as temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed, and direction. Each of these variables can be ...


4

Your NoData cells actually contain the value -10'000 and therefore produce said "strange values". So you need to tell the Raster Calculator to ignore these values. You can do this using SetNull (see this link), as the expression below shows: SetNull("raster1" == -10000, "raster1") + SetNull("raster2" == -10000, "raster2") This will change the -10'000 to ...


4

The subject has a lot of atention among specialists and the number of tools available depends on the amount of work you wnat to put on it. The paradox is that you want to avoid wet areas while stormwater engineers are looking for recreational areas to use them as ponds and damping peak flows. There are three levels at which you can take your analysis: ...


3

One way is to use the Define Projection Tool in ArcToolbox (or the raster's property page in ArcCatalog). I would pick a related projected coordinate system as a start point. Browse to Projected Coordinate Systems, Continental, Africa and choose Africa Albers Equal Area Conic. Right-click and choose Copy and Modify I would change the PCS name. Update the ...


3

I think this question is most easily answered by taking your shapefiles and doing two tests: Append them together and examine the result Union them together and examine the result If either or both tests cause an error or do not meet your requirements then, after reviewing their documentation, you will be in a position to ask a more focussed question. If ...


3

If you want to calculate streamflow from rainfall/precipitation events, a hydrological model is needed. HEC-HMS is a good & not that complicated model. You can use HEC-GeoHMS (addon for ArcGIS) to generate most of the inputs for HEC-HMS. A very good tutorial for both HEC-HMS & HEC-GeoHMS can be found here http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~vmerwade/tutorial....


3

Co kringing needs another variable (the covariable), example - for rainfall, it could be the elevation. The best one to start its ordinary kriging.


3

For GLDAS precipitation monthly you could use 'Rainf_f_tavg' or 'Rainf_tavg' bands from 3 hourly "NASA/GLDAS/V20/NOAH/G025/T3H" product (resolution of 0.25 arc degrees). It would produce 8 daily values for these climatic elements. However, it is demanding very time processing so, you need to process a small time series for daily (2-5 years) or monthly ...


2

The data is expensive to access through an API, but it might be worth looking at Wolfram Alpha sometimes for inspiration on things like this. It's possible to get structured data out of it and also to look at the sources it uses to compile the information.


2

You should look into the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for this type of analysis. It really depends on the soil types in your area along with temperature and topography. There are simpler ways to approximate your runoff (USLE method or the rational method), however it would be better if you could get more information. http://swat.tamu.edu/ Good luck!


2

GDAL can read grib files and can talk to python, so it should be no problem to use it on Windows. You don't need cygwin to use GDAL, take a look at the binaries provided by http://gisinternals.com/sdk


2

You are correct that Arc Hydro only uses elevation information to delinieate streams, catchment, etc. There is not a tool built in to do exactly what you're asking. Arc Hydro does provide other tools such as calculating drainage area centroid, and longest flow path. These tools may be helpful to you in finding catchment properties in a more traditional ...


2

In some cases you will be computing and others you simply need to obtain the data. Rainfall: you will need these as input rasters by month. Do you have this data? You could check out NOAA http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/GIS/GIS_DATA/ Flow Accumulation: This should be calculated off of a flow direction grid using Spatial Analyst. Flow direction is ...


2

You could try building a relational database. Have just your stations as individual locations, then have the rest of your data as a table. You can perform a relate using the shapes and table. Might want to consider building a relationship class for this. http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//004t00000007000000 I hope this helps!


2

I work with our city's storm sewer team and they are required to keep all of their data in NASSCO formats and standards. In addition to the attributes like material, length, etc, NASSCO standards give you the ability to rate the condition of the pipe and flag any defects in the pipe. If you are planning on using a CCTV crew to inspect the pipes their work ...


2

Depending on your problem and the nature of the details you want to keep, you might want to : Use a channel with cross sections in Flo-2D to have a close approach of the river bed Use coarser elements outside this area, if the precision there is less critical. In Flo-2D, you might also want to check the water depth and increase the roughness if the ...


2

Here is a translation of the steps in your question to GRASS commands. Without knowing how your data are structured, I'll make some assumptions. Lets say the precipitation data are CSV files with three columns, x_coord, y_coord and precip. Each file precip file has the year in its file name, like "precip_2010.csv". And I'll assume you have already imported ...


2

The metadata says the following: "The GPCP 1-degree Daily (1DD) dataset is used and disaggregated to 3-hourly interval" From that, and since the timestamps in the filenames run from *0000* to *2100*, I would conclude that this time is the starting point from where to count 3 hours forwards. For your example, this would mean *0600* should probably be the ...


2

To fully answer your question I need more information on what exactly you define as "wet patches", but I believe that you are looking for the tool "Flow Accumulation", explained here by ESRI. You could combine that with basins created with Watershed and other hydrologic characteristics like Flow Direction, or you could check the concavity of the DEM with ...


2

Calculating the topographic wetness index should be of great use. Its a classic metric for determining likely wet and dry patches relative to the rest of the landscape based on the curvature and upslope drainage area. Without fully diving into incorporating land cover, water sources and quantities, and artificial drainage infrastructure, this would be a good ...


2

If you want to take an average of all 12 images, the process is very simple. Within a raster calculator (this can be the calculator in the raster drop-down menu or the GDAL/GRASS/SAGA calculators in the toolbox), create a tool-specific formula that describes an averaging equation: (Pjan + Pfeb + ... + Pdec) / N Where N is your number of observations (12). ...


2

As your code has several issues, I fixed them for adequately running it. On the other hand, as your HUC6_RMP bound is unknown for me, I assumed an arbitrary point in Idaho for only two years (1994, 1995). Complete code looks as follows: var pt = ee.Geometry.Point (-114.71171874999999, 43.22995405445601); var climateYEAR = ee.ImageCollection(ee.List....


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