Hot answers tagged

10

Download and use a plugin called "Profile tool". load your grid load your polyline (layer) run plugin (Plugins/Profile tool/ Terrain profile) in field called "Selection" (below the profile chart) choose "Selected polyline" and choose your line To simply get all grid values along the line switch tab from "Profile" to "Table" and there you can copy all ...


9

From the command line you can start QGIS with the --profile option: qgis-bin.exe --profile spanish will start QGIS and load my spanish profile on Windows.


8

I've been trying to find how to do this for a while. @Kazuhito's comment led me to find this. You need two things:- a line (your axis or route) a DEM (raster) Convert Points to Line You can get your points into a line using the Points2One plugin. It helps if they're already sorted in the order you want them to appear in the line, or you have a unique ...


6

For anybody who's interested, here's a modified version of JamesS code creating perpendicular lines using numpy and osgeo libraries only. Thanks to JamesS, his answer helped me a lot today! import osgeo from osgeo import ogr import numpy as np # ############################################################################## # User input # Input shapefile. ...


6

I had the same problem and tried James S' solution, but couldn't get the GDAL to work with Fiona. Then I discovered the SAGA algorithm "Cross Profiles" in QGIS 2.4, and got exactly the result I wanted and that I presume you are looking for too (see below).


5

Instead of organizing data where each plot is in a different column, do it as a dataframe with all Z values in one column and an additional index column with the plot ID. For example: plot_id Z 1 10.3 1 11.4 2 12.8 2 7.6 3 24.5 ... ... One will probably have trouble loading all data in R memory, and some options to ...


5

Using your xml file and matplotlib you can achieve nice results if you put some effort in it. Matplotlib plots can be tweaked to look alot like your example. The trickiest part was to calculate where to place the labels. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np #Function to project geometries to get distances in meters instead of degrees #From: ...


5

I would recommand to use DataPlotly Plugin (https://github.com/ghtmtt/DataPlotly) for that. You can use the selected points or all of them. In the example below I've used the x-coordinate of each point versus the z value (elevation).


4

If you load your LineString gpx/geojson ogr2ogr -f "PostgreSQL" PG:"dbname=" linestring.geojson and DEM tiff into PostGIS (replace XXXX with EPSG code, eg for WGS84 use 4326) raster2pgsql -d -C -I -M -s XXXX -t auto dem.tiff dem you can then use ST_Segmentize to add extra vertices at the resolution of your DEM (gdalinfo's Pixel Size), then ST_DumpPoints ...


4

Instead of using a plugin, try using optimised and native tools. In processing toolbox, try to SAGA > Terrain Analysis > Profiles from lines.


4

You could combine QGIS with HTML/Javascript (Highcharts or any other framework) to produce appealing elevation profiles. With the help of some Python expression functions, it's possible to use the QGIS Atlas feature to show multiple tracks together with their corresponding waypoints. The idea is, to create a virtual waypoints layer that will be filtered by ...


4

Looking beyond QGIS I found the answer directly in GDAL VRT, and it's so simple. I only need to add <Scale>10.0</Scale> to the VRTRasterBand: <VRTDataset rasterXSize="412502" rasterYSize="323997"> <SRS dataAxisToSRSAxisMapping="1,2">EPSG:31255</SRS> <GeoTransform>-9.75e+04,0.5,0,362000,0,-...


4

The SRTM DEM has a ground resolution of 30 meters (1 arc-second), see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shuttle_Radar_Topography_Mission#Highest_Resolution_Global_Release and references. So the elevation is "averaged" over a 30x30 meter square. Average in quotes because it is not a mathematical operation, but a physical result of the backscattering of ...


3

As a workaround solution, you can interpolate a line from your mosaic dataset using the 'interpolate line' tool. You can then use the output line to create the profile. According to this post: https://geonet.esri.com/thread/62956, the first line you interpolate may take some time, but all subsequent lines will process quickly.


3

Sewer and Storm Profiles can be created using the ArcGIS for Water Utilities add-in tools. Your network data needs to be in a geometric network (so that it can trace from manhole to manhole). There is a little config required to point the tool at the correct layers and elevation/ID/size fields in those layers (this is easier than the documentation makes it ...


3

I have committed changes in the repository that implement the axis. Use this code to install the latest development version: ## install.packages("devtools") devtools::install_github("rastervis", "oscarperpinan") Then, use the new argument axis.margin to enable the axis. f <- system.file("external/test.grd", package="raster") r <- raster(f) ...


3

Vince's comment partially answers your problem - your data is in degrees, so the x axis or length is also going to be displayed in degrees rather than meters. However I think you're also confusing what Profile Sampling actually does. It will not change the values or labels of your x axis - that's the length of your line in whatever units of measure your CRS ...


3

The "Add layer" button is only for the raster layers. To get the profile for a certain line: activate the line layer (= highlight it in the layer list) activate the profile tool (in the toolbar) click on the line feature on the map


3

An elevation profile or a topographic profile is a two-dimensional cross sectional view of the landscape. It provides a side view of the relief of the terrain along a line drawn between two locations on a topographic map. Whereas, the longitudinal profile is a two-dimensional view along the river, and it characterizes average stream slopes and depths of ...


3

At 3.8.3, here's what works for me: I have a raster DEM and a vector point shapefile (the point shapefile does not have elevation values in its attribute table). I want to create an slope profile that follows the point shapefile, utilizing the underlying DEM elevation values: Start the Profile tool. Click the DEM in the QGIS Table of Contents. In the ...


3

I had the same question and looked everywhere! Finally a solution - you need to use "TIN interpolation". This video explains it perfectly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhJ77uHlTJA It demonstrates other processes as well but the main thing is they used contour line data and created a DEM. Really good explanation as well. Key tools used: TIN ...


3

Use the Sample raster values or Add Raster Values to Points tool to extract raster values: Make sure each line has a unique attribute, eg "Line_ID". Convert the lines into points Use the Extract vertices tool if the vertices are frequent enough, or Use the Points along geometry tool if you want more frequent/evenly spaced sampling points Use the Sample ...


2

I created a workaround solution to the problem. Instead of using the graph output from StackProfile_3d it is possible to create a graph from the value table. With this approach it is also possible to customize the look of the graph using a graph text template which first must be created, see intructions in the code below. import arcpy # Set Local ...


2

It seems there is a bug with this function in version 10.1: Bug NIM-092377 - When using Python to generate a Stack Profile, 3D Analyst (arcpy.StackProfile_3d), the output table and graph generated are blank. It doesn't correspond fully to your description as your table is not empty, though. Apparently it's solved with 10.2, you could try with this version if ...


2

MapQuest has an Elevation Service API you can use (for free). All you need is an API Key. I recommend creating your own graph as their default one is not very aesthetically pleasing.


2

It is handled by an esri geoprocessing service, which it is recommended that you update from the old service. The details page mentions plenty of good reference information.


2

The units of the graph and how to change them depend on which axis you're looking at. First, the horizontal units are the same as your current map projection. If you are using a Geographic coordinate system, the units will be degrees. If you're using a standard UTM projection, the units will be meters. The only way to change this use a different projection, ...


2

To build the boreholes, I would recommend this tool which is intended to be used with the 3D Analyst extension of ArcGIS for Desktop: You can set the coordinates of the starting points, azimuth and tilt of the borehole, the depth of the layers interfaces, a water level and some related data through bar charts parallel to the borehole axis. http://www.geol-...


2

You don't need a specific add-on programme, look at The Subsurface Geology of Brussels, Belgium, Is Modeled with 3D GIS with 3D Analyst. or Modeling the Terrain Below (3D Borehole tools)


2

If I understood the question right, take a look at r3.cross.rast which creates cross section 2D raster map from 3D raster map based on 2D elevation map. From that 2D map you can generate the area report.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible