Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

Hot answers tagged

3

You can do this with numpy and rasterio: import numpy as np import rasterio as rio from rasterio import Affine out_raster = 'path/to/output.tif' xmin = 147.5 ymax = -34.5 res = 0.00833 cols = 100 rows = 150 profile = { 'driver': 'GTiff', 'dtype': 'uint32', 'width': cols, 'height': rows, 'count': 1, 'crs': 'epsg:4326', '...


3

This error is resulting from an error check within the function. if (length(dim(x)) > 2) { warning("data must be grayscale image") } Given this condition length(dim(x)), a single band rasterLayer class object will always return 3 representing row, column and nlayers dimensions. Whereas this function, in theory, operates on a matrix object it is not ...


2

It sounds like you have Scale Dependent Visibility set on your raster layer. Have a look under the Rendering tab of the Layer Properties dialog of your raster layer and make sure that the check box for Scale Dependent Visibility is unchecked.


2

Yes, you can do object-based pattern recognition with the Orfeo Toolbox (OTB) plugin in QGIS. It's not a native plugin to QGIS, so you will have to download it (here) and then follow the installation instructions. Besides segmentation, there are a lot of other powerful tools within OTB that you can use, such as their machine learning algorithms for image ...


1

I think you can give a try to Freehand raster georeferencer. It is QGIS plugin. You must add raster to QGIS from this plugins toolbar to start working with it and even it's already georeferenced, you can make changes to it. Sample gif:


1

No, it's not true, in general. You could simply burn the features into a raster where cells are given an automatically-incrementing ID that relate to features (where this isn't a property of the features), or indeed nothing at all (e.g. a binary presence/absence surface), or using the vector dataset's extent to define a raster's extent without considering ...


1

This is the classic "new to GIS" problem. It happens to everyone, and it may or may not be because of something you did. Sometimes GIS data just doesn't come with the correct projection data encoded in it. You're doing well so far. Don't panic. Good job using a base map to figure out which layers are correctly located. You've narrowed the problem down ...


1

If you are using ESRI products and you have point data with the proposed final elevation values of your project you can create a TIN from those points. Convert the TIN to a raster. Then replace that portion of the DEM with the raster version of your berm and pond. There is a lot of help to get you there online and these steps use standard tools. Some ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible