9

ESRI intentionally obfuscated the FileGDB file structure so people wouldn't try and mess with it internally: A file geodatabase is stored as a folder of files. When you view the folder with Windows Explorer, apart from the .gdb extension, it looks like any other folder and you can view its contents. The folder contains cryptically named files that ...


8

It is a way to maintain object identity since the standard geodatabase objectids are not preserved after an export/import cycle. It enables you to uniquely identify your features across the entire database. That should help understand why features like replication rely on this.


8

If you need to have multiple PCs accessing files, it would seem to make more sense to migrate to a true spatial server setup rather than an ad hoc one using Dropbox. This could be either a hosted server running ArcGIS or a PostGIS database running on a cloud web service like AWS. My preference would be for the latter. It'll take a little more work to set ...


7

Replicas and geodatabases An ArcSDE geodatabase can host both child and parent replicas. This enables data to be replicated across multiple geodatabases Full Official Documentation http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Replicas_and_geodatabases/003n000000vp000000/


7

Versioning is for editing in a multi-user environment. Replication is for replicating your data in a multi-database environment. They are two very different things. In a multi-user environment the versioning is used to enable handling of conflicts where two (or more) editors may have edited the same feature. It gives the abililty to choose the correct ...


5

I've wrote similar python code what your trying to do. Try the following: Check current version using Describe/Workspace properties Create ArcSDE Connection File to connect to version you want to replicate Replicate version using Create Replica Hope that helps.


5

It will not be simple to manage but it can be done. Please note that the network (or objects) will need to be broken at the edge of the boundary or the overlapping objects will be included in both dbs. A replica is created "from" an mxd document. So queries, and versions are honored. You don't describe the database and that will be key to the level ...


5

For making reproducible a random selection you need to use in a PyQGIS script, for instance, 'random.seed' method from numpy. Assuming that you have 10.000 points in your layer, next code select same 250 points each time is running (with seed equal 0). import numpy as np np.random.seed(0) random_numbers = [] n = 0 while (n < 250): number = np....


4

I went and voted for this, but I want to share my workaround too as it took much research to figure out. I was able to create a replica using CHECK_OUT then when complete used arcpy.SyncronizeChanges_management and as a result the replica was removed.


3

I suggest to use the SQL Server express that is accompanied with the ArcGIS Installation media (DVD) and stay away from newer versions of SQL Server for this purpose. If you downloaded the installation file from the Esri Customer Care portal, unzip the file and run the ESRI.exe. If you have an ISO file, use an ISO extractor to access the installation files ...


3

So it turns out the tool doesn't exist. There is a request to ESRI to create it under the ideas site. If anybody comes across this post and has a similar need it would be great if you could vote for it too. Edit 20160325 Gerald suggested the unregister operation in a feature service, and it turns out there is also an unregister operation in a geodata ...


3

I think the short answer is no. You would need an sde gdb to make the second replica. The esri distributed database model is fully and clearly documented. In the Esri pdf doc- The following describes each technique: „ Geodatabase replication: Geodatabase replication allows you to distribute data across two or more geodatabases such that edits can be ...


3

Unfortunately, there is no out-of-the-box tool to add a feature class to an existing replica. Please see this Esri KB article: With ArcGIS Desktop, one must either recreate the replica or if the workflow allows, replicate the new feature class as a separate replica. The only "core platform" way to do this is to use ArcObjects and there is a sample ...


3

Sure, its' not convenient, but you could just use a check-out replica. By not convenient, i mean that its a one-shot deal: you have to recreate the child and check back in every time you want to create edits. How often do you need to do this? How much data are we talking about? It would be fairly easy to automate this process via model builder or arcpy. Oh,...


3

I understand replicas a little better now and it turns out that I needed to replicate to an XML document when using the Create Replica Wizard in ArcMAP. I then send the XML Document to the person at the other end and they can use the Import -> XML Workspace Document within ArcCatalog to import both the data and replica information into their ArcSDE ...


3

Replication would be the easiest, but you do have to register as versioned and you do have to use a global ID. Your only other options would be a model or python script, as you suspected. But the esri local government blog and gallery has recently mentioned an etl tool that is in beta. Look it up, it might help? http://gizinta.com/


3

There is no way to mirror the databases "on the fly" using ArcGIS geodatabase replication. You could attempt something like this with DBMS replication but that is not a recommended practice. Best thing to do is set up a scheduled task to run the synchronization (via python script) as frequently as you need. Understanding Distributed Data The following ...


3

To add 12 points randomly in each grid polygon, you need to do the following steps: Add a new field in the polygon grid layer of Type integer and length of 2 In the attribute table, select the new field, enter 12, and Update All Go to Processing Toolbox -> QGIS Geoalgorithms -> Vector Creation Tools -> Random points inside polygons (Variable) ...


3

You should not edit a child in one-way replication, because if you are editing the child table the edits will be overwritten upon next the synchronization. The whole point of the replica is to synchronize (overwrite) the child with the parent on a scheduled or on-demand basis. ESRI Replication Types Description If you are using two-way replication then ...


3

Based on information in comments, it appears that you have been editing the base tables using SQL. You should not make changes to the base tables directly using your RDBMS software. You should use only the versioned views when editing directly with SQL. For documentation on this see: http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/manage-data/using-sql-with-gdbs/...


3

Using following code, you can use identify the feature class that is causing this problem. But before using this delete/unregister previous replicas. import arcpy from arcpy import env # Set workspace, must be ParentDB. parent_workspace= "parent.sde" child_workspace ="child.se" env.workspace="parent.sde" replica_type = "ONE_WAY_REPLICA" #make sure the ...


2

The new feature outside the extent should not be showing up in the child replicas. Their new features should be limited to the extent of their original selection. The delete is actually behaving correctly, as the message for the delete should not be transmitted to the children since it is outside their extent. The add is behaving incorrectly.


2

Your workflow will not technically be supported, so yes it is dangerous. Consider this documentation: Replication and geodatabase releases (10.2.x) http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//003n000000z3000000 Geodatabases built using previous versions of ArcGIS do not support some of the newer functions of ArcGIS. Consequently, if ...


2

If your choice of terminology is accurate, then you generated a Geodatabase Replica to ship to the regional office. The replica generation process includes a named version which ends up receiving the regional edits once returned. Importantly, there are specific requirements to use the replica in a disconnected state. (Be sure to review the geodatabase ...


2

The target geodatabase needs to exist for the arcpy.CreateReplica_management() to work; this tool will not create it for you. From Create Replica - ArcGIS Desktop Help: The local geodatabase or geodata service that will host the child replica. Geodata services are used to represent remote geodatabases. The geodatabase can be an ArcSDE, file, or ...


2

Too bad you aren't using creating replicas from a feature service, then you could just use the REST API to unregister (pretty easy call with Python). I don't have an arcpy solution for you as I don't think it is available there yet. I do have a Python comtypes ArcObjects solution that works though. I am using a modified version of the Snippets module. ...


2

Found this python on my local install (2.18.10) and saw the same behaviour. It seems to have been moved elsewhere in Master branch on GitHub, so this will change in QGIS 3 I don't normally suggest local fixes like this as they can cause problems even if they don't, you'll lose changes next time you upgrade QGIS That said, looking at the code of ...


2

You've described a system that is working exactly as designed. Replication works within the geodatabase versioning framework to identify changes that have occurred within the parent, and to push those changes down to the child. The problem is that you are not using the system as designed. When you make manual edits to the Oracle enterprise geodatabase via ...


1

I believe the replica name has to be a unique string. Your code is passing a null.


1

If you publish the GDB to ArcGIS for Server you can called the unRegisterReplica web method passing in the GUID of the Replica. I was on 10.4


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