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9

The FCC census block conversion API is exactly what you're looking for.


8

Suppose your district table looks like this districts(name text, the_geom geometry) Then you would select the district a point falls into using SELECT name FROM districts WHERE ST_Within(ST_SetSRID(ST_MakePoint(lon,lat),4326), the_geom); Replace lon and lat with your values. If your districts are in a different projection than WGS84, ...


8

This is a known limitation of the .dbf files that accompany the shapefiles. This among other reasons is why the shapefile format is being slowly phased out and replaced by more robust formats. As I see it, the only reasons the shapefile is still around is because it still can be read by every GIS software under the sun. As for your problem you have two ...


6

This site may have what you are looking for: http://www.gadm.org/ and http://www.gadm.org/country


6

Reverse Geocode (Geocoding) Creates addresses from point locations in a feature class. The reverse geocoding process searches for the nearest address or intersection for the point location based on the specified search distance. In ArcMap, the tool is located under Geocoding Tools. Note that you'll need to have an address locator to reverse ...


6

Please check out http://www.datasciencetoolkit.org/ a ready to use virtual machine(VM) for geocoding and reverse geocoding, it provides useful information including FIPS codes. i hope it will help.


6

The answer to this could be VERY broad in that it really does depend on what you want it to do. Generally, the way a complex geocoding system works is there are multiple layers that the geocode operation runs against, in a specified order. So, for example, many of them will look and try and match the input up with a point of interest by name, then it'll ...


6

I finally found what I was looking for: a package called reverse_geocode. It can be installed with pip. >>>> import reverse_geocode >>>> coordinates = (-37.81, 144.96), (31.76, 35.21) >>>> reverse_geocode.search(coordinates) [{'city': 'Melbourne', 'code': 'AU', 'country': 'Australia'}, {'city': 'Jerusalem', 'code': 'IL',...


5

In PostGIS, if you have a table of points, and the census boundary information that @Sminbamangu refers to you could calculate this using the following approach: SELECT c.census_tract, p.point_id FROM census_boundary as c, table_of_points as p WHERE ST_Contains(c.geom, p.geom); You can see the description ST_Contains ...


5

You cannot legally cache or store results from Google's Map API (with pretty narrow exceptions). From the Terms of Service (with emphasis added): 10.1.3 Restrictions against Data Export or Copying. ... (b) No Pre-Fetching, Caching, or Storage of Content. You must not pre-fetch, cache, or store any Content, except that you may store: (i) ...


5

OS Code-Point Open is probably the best you will get for free, and should provide you with all the data you need.


4

I suggest you try out Geocode.Farm (https://geocode.farm). You can always just past the address into the address bar the same as you would put it into a form and it will display in XML the output, but it is human readable: 000.00000 -000.000000 Maybe this will work for you.


4

Looks like the Google reverse geocoding API will break it down for you, take a look at this result: http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/geocode/xml?latlng=40.714224,-73.961452&sensor=false If you switch out xml with json, you can get json instead. Another option could be the Nominatim service, which also returns either xml or json.


4

You will find free geocoding services limited (in quailty) but commercial geocoders (Google Enterprise, Yahoo JBoss, TomTom) good quality but expensive for number of requests over 100,000+ Geocoding is the process of matching addresses with geographic coordinates. The MapQuest Open Geocoding API designed to provide an easier way to geocode using ...


4

I recommend mapping the XY coordinates using QGIS. This will create a Point shapefile. There are many posts about how to do this. Next, if don't have the landgrid shapefile containing Township/Range/Section data, it should be easy to find on the Internet, search for "State Name" GIS data. Finally, Intersect the two shapefiles using QGIS. Each Point should ...


4

Working with the GeoNames.org database can be a bit difficult because of this inconsistency in the categories you described. I don't know where it comes from, but I guess it has to do with the different sources the names are from. In regions like Europe it is even harder to work with the GeoNames.org data, because of the different administration levels in ...


4

It should be able to find it if postgis is in your database search path. Trying doing this: ALTER DATABASE your_db SET search_path=public,postgis; Then connect to your database again and do: CREATE EXTENSION fuzzystrmatch; CREATE EXTENSION postgis_tiger_geocoder;


4

I guess the relationship is a bit tricky to discover. In fact i guess there is no relationship in the sense of OSM: I mean your building is not referenced as a member of the University of texas relation. In a reproducible perspective, what you can do I such a case could be to perform an overpass query, based on the attribute fetched from the Nominatim ...


4

PyShp will let you read the shapefile, but won't help you figure out if a point is in a boundary. You'll have to combine it with something like Shapely to do the geometric calculations. Luckily, the two modules can interoperate through the Python Geo Interface. Some basic functionality (untested) would be like: import shapefile from Shapely.geometry import ...


4

I can't find any information on Mapzen https://mapzen.com/blog/migration/ Note Mapzen will cease operations at the end of January 2018, and its hosted APIs and all related support and services will turn off on February 1, 2018. The next best thing is Pelias


4

In ArcGIS, the tool would be Near (or Near Table). Based on this thread, I think the QGIS equivalent is NNJoin. What roads layer are you using? You could download the TIGER roads from the US Census for free here: https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/tiger-line.html (assuming you are looking at a US city). If you'd prefer an API option, check out the ...


3

You might want to try using GEOS, a C++ port of the Java Topology Suite: http://trac.osgeo.org/geos/ You were on the right lines with a bounding-box check, but the even smarter way is build a spatial index which means you can do better than O(n) for that first pass. GEOS can build spatial indexes for you. I'm wondering what mobile platform you're ...


3

I made good experience with nominatim. Try this (College Park in Toronto) lat long lookup address lookup More examples can be found here examples. It is in German but the examples are self declarative. I guess the premium product is googles map API. Therefore I mentioned just something which might be an alternative.


3

Another geocoder to consider is Nominatim. It uses OpenStreetMap data. http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Nominatim For the usage policy of nominatim.openstreetmap.org, please see Nominatim usage policy. MapQuest also provide a version of this API, without the usage limits. As for comparisons... I have not come across much in terms of benchmarks or a ...


3

I believe you can use geonames for reverse geocoding. You can find information about the use of webservices here: http://www.geonames.org/export/web-services.html


3

Your question is "What is reverse geocoding" Reverse geocoding is when you have a point (either as an x,y pair or by the user picking a point) and you want an address. Geocoding is when you have an address, or poi, or city center, and you want a point. All geocodable street segments contain a range of addresses for each side (set forth by the addressing ...


3

I work for Geocode.Farm = Full Disclosure Terms Of Service have been updated to remove this clause recently. It did cause confusion. What it originally meant is don't display the results pay in plain text, parse it and then use the results. For coders, I'll provide these examples: Example, don't do: $data=get_file_contents($url); echo($data); ...


3

For obtaining the full address you have to use a geocoder such as Nominatim. There are other geocoders for OSM available, too. Also see your very similar question at help.openstreetmap.org.


3

Your browser and other HTTP/HTTPS clients will sent an Accept-Language field in the HTTP request header. This can for example look like: Accept-Language: de-DE,de;q=0.8,en-US;q=0.5,en;q=0.3\r\n Which means: prefer German (de-DE or de) with an quality value of 0.8, then US-English (en-US) with an quality value of 0.5 (i.e. lower than German), then English (...


2

You can look up the specific 9-digit zip code on the usps site: https://tools.usps.com/zip-code-lookup.htm?byaddress


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