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19

Activate symbol layers in the advanced options of your road style. With rule-dependent styles, check rendering order. Terminology seems inconsistent unfortunately.


17

I found this metadata file indicating: C = County I = Interstate M = Common Name O = Other S = State recognized U = U.S.


13

Collapse Dual Lines To Centerline (Cartography) This is a specific ArcGIS tool requiring ArcInfo License ArcGIS for Desktop Basic: No ArcGIS for Desktop Standard: No ArcGIS for Desktop Advanced: Yes Convert you polygons to lines first "Derives centerlines from dual-line (or double-line) features, such as road casings, based on specified width ...


13

you can check out ET GeoTools for ArcGIS here. Beside this you can check out Feature To Line (Data Management) here but you have to some engaging in. and check out Finding tunnel 'center line'? skeletisation algorithms may can help you to develop your tool. Input Dataset Result


11

A general way of solving this problem is to find all polylines having a node whose valence = 1. A valence table may be created either in memory or on disk, using a key that is the hash of the x&y of each end point of each polyline. You may wish to truncate x and y may be truncated if polylines are not snapped. Each node is labeled by its degree (or ...


11

IRIS is one existing open-source solution you should probably be aware of: From Wikipedia: IRIS (Intelligent Roadway Information System) is an open-source Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS) software project developed by the Minnesota Department of Transportation. It is used by transportation agencies to monitor and manage interstate and ...


10

I had to do this just recently. Using ArcGIS 10: If you only want to symbolise the dead ends you can just set up a Topology on the roads featureclass and set the rule "Must not have dangles". this will put a marker on every feature that has a dead end. Alternatively, run the "Feature Vertices to Points" Tool (Located in Data Management Tools --> Features) ...


10

I would recommend using image segmentation with the free software SPRING, available from the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research. Documentation is available here and tutorials are available here. Image segmentation produces high classification accuracy compared to purely pixel based classification methods (e.g. ISODATA, Maximum Likelihood, etc). ...


10

Finally i got a solution. I converted the polygon to image in arcgis using Polygon to raster tool. Then reclassified it and used Automatic vectorization. About 90 percent accuracy is obtained using this method. There are only little snapping mismatches and also the line is drawn through the exact centre. I think this is the best way if you do not have a ET ...


10

Considerations First thing to consider, you might remove freeways and ramps from your road system before you start, depending on your interpretation of a block or intersection. First problem is knowing the state of your road system. If road centerlines are split at each intersection and only at intersections, then we proceed with Features Vertices to ...


10

You need to use Split lines by lines tool, and use the same file as input layer and split layer, as you can see below: You can find the tool from Processing toolbox -> QGIS Geoalgorithms -> Vector Overlay tools -> Split lines by lines Here is the tool in the Processing Menu: Before running the tool: After running the tool: Update for QGIS 3.x ...


9

These two modeling available in ESRI software. After you can run 1st modeling we will do trim on lines model 2.


8

This is known as swept-path analysis. It is one of those calculations that seems initially to be relatively trivial but soon becomes obvious that there is a lot more to it because it is not just the tightness of the turn that is important. Some of the other things to consider include: Length of the vehicle and point of articulation. Turning circle of the ...


8

I posted this question on the R-sig-Geo listserv and received a helpful answer from Adrian Baddeley, one of the spatstats authors. I will post my interpretation of his response here for posterity. Adrian notes that the function spatstat::pixellate.psp() is a better match to my task. This function converts a line segment pattern (or SpatialLines object ...


7

I downloaded a dataset from the City of Rome using the osmar package. After that, I followed your query to get the desired highways and then build a random SpatialPoints object inside Rome bounding box retrieved data. I measured distances between points and lines using the function dist2line from the geosphere package. Please, try the code below: # Load ...


6

GRASS method: v.clean in={your input vector} tool=rmdangle thresh={your threshold} out={output vector}


6

In ArcGIS Standard or Advanced, you can put your road network into a Feature Dataset in a Geodatabase. You can then set up a topology on the network and create a topology rule which identifies "dangles". This will identify all roads which do not connect to something at one or both ends. Note, this will also identify potential errors in your network which ...


6

Create a copy of your road. Start editing it, select line and and split into equal length segments, I’d say approximately 50 m. Convert segments to 3D shapes: Calculate field abs( !Shape!.lastPoint.Z- !Shape!.firstPoint.Z)/ !Shape!.length*100 Result: Please note both roads shown are fictions. One of them made of contour line, guess which. I wonder to see ...


6

In the OSM raw data, all ways (roads or else) are described as a sorted set of node numbers. Roads can be identified by a highway-tag, with some exceptions like highway=bus_stop, bridleway or footway. A road junction is just a node, the roads don't have to be split up there. Roads crossing with bridges should not have a common node. To identify a road ...


6

Duplicate each layer (Right click on the layer name > duplicate layer). This does not create any additional data. It simply loads the same source data into the project again. Change the style of the original layers to the red line only. Move both duplicate layers underneath the original layers in the layer panel. Set the style of the duplicate layers to ...


6

In ArcGIS Field Calculator, you can use a simple Python expression with the string.capwords function to capitalize only the first letter of each word and change everything else to lowercase. Select Python as the Parser, and check the Show Codeblock option. Then, in Pre-Logic Script Code enter: import string Then in the box below that the code should be (...


5

You could try the Identity tool, using your line features as the input, and polygons as the identity features: "When the Input Features are lines and the Identity Features are polygons, and the Keep relationships parameter is checked (relationship set to KEEP_RELATIONSHIPS), the output line feature class will have two additional fields, LEFT_poly and ...


5

Update you roads direction using a formula something like if (45 <= (360 + math.atan2((!Shape.lastpoint.X! - !Shape.firstpoint.X!),(!Shape.lastpoint.Y! - !Shape.firstpoint.Y!)) * (180 / math.pi)) % 360 % 180) < 135): dir = 'W-E' else: dir = 'N-S' Then for each direction group number them in order using the first opposite ordinate to sort. ...


5

The warning message is quite clear here: 1: In RGEOSDistanceFunc(spgeom1, spgeom2, byid, "rgeos_distance") : Spatial object 1 is not projected; GEOS expects planar coordinates It requires planar (Cartesian) coordinates, i.e. in meters, miles, etc. You however use polar reference system (WGS-1984). You should re-project your SpatialPointDataFrame to a ...


5

OpenStreetMap data might be what you are looking for -- it is somewhat standardized and pretty up-to-date across many parts of the globe. Check out their wiki for steps on download and converting their datasets. Then just extract the roads data from there. http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Downloading_data#All_data_at_once


4

As with everythin in GIS there's more than one way to do it: ArcGIS has a feature to do just this, See Divide line function. Of course, remember that you rarely have an exact division unless you use the percentage option (i.e. you will get a bit left over). And, to be honest, I found it would not always work perfectly but it doesn't do too bad a job. ...


4

There are a few ways to do this. For the intersections you can use a tool in QGIS (Arc I am sure too) called Line Intersections (Vectors - Analysis Tools). As for the blocks, what I have done for that is to have a polygon of the AOI which covers the entire area. Then I use the roads to cut that polygon into polygon segments. This will give you blocks of ...


4

You can download the data from open street map .Use the Export button on top left option to download data. Additionally if you are looking for an routing/ networking algorithm you can have a look at project OSRM which uses the above mentioned data for routing. hope it helps. good luck .


4

I think that "node centrality" concepts, in the graph theoretic literature, may be helpful. Here is an introduction to centrality measures in graphs.


4

I've experienced issues similar to this while using ArcMap 10.x. When I've changed the size of the map document after I developed the map with symbols and labels. Let me explain further. For example, my supervisor needs a map to be created on 8 1/2 x 11 paper, I work on the layers, add labels (converted to annotation) and the map is about ready to go. ...


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