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8

Removed the previous links, which I should have checked more scrutinously, and found some information and shapefiles which hopefully would be of some use: The EEZ Boundaries (Exclusive Economic Zone) which for this purpose is mainly used to show the coastal lines and outlines of continents. http://www.marineregions.org/downloads.php#eez The main Global ...


6

GraphHopper (using OpenStreetMap Data) GraphHopper offers memory efficient algorithms in Java for routing on graphs. E.g. Dijkstra and A* but also optimized road routing algorithms like Contraction Hierarchies. It stands under the Apache License and is build on a large test suite. OpenStreetMap is directly supported from GraphHopper. Without ...


6

You can either use pgRouting or if not using your data but the OSM street network would be fine, use the OSM Route plugin: Enter a start point and fill out the Accessibility Analysis options.


5

For whoever also stumbles on this question. Now for more than 2 years since the inital question was raised and QGis 3.X has become more mature, one could achieve this by ORS tools or QNEAT3 ORS tools uses the Open Route Services API (online) and has some limitations QNEAT3 can be used for offline/own network files


4

As far as I know, it's still the case that you cannot use the M-part of geometries. I know that PostGIS supports M and it depends on your use case if that can be an alternative.


4

OSM Tools: My recommendation would be to use OSM tools for QGIS which you can download as a plugin. OSM tools was created by Nils Rode and is an adaptation of the OSMroute plugin which uses the OpenRouteService API. Simply download the plugin and request an API key, once you have this you simply use the routing tab (the other tab is for accessibility e.g. ...


4

You can use the Join by lines (hub lines) tool for this. This algorithm creates hub and spoke diagrams by connecting lines from points on the Spoke layer to matching points in the Hub layer.


4

Unlike Arcmap you don't need a separate tool or even a plugin to access this information in QGIS (at last from version 3.4, maybe in earlier version as well). By using the "identify features" tool you have access to all kind of geometric information in the "derived section" including closest vertex M value and interpolated M value. Of course this work ...


3

I think that this will not work from your desktop, but needs to be uploaded to a server. These lines in L.Routing.OSRM.js 23 L.Routing.OSRM = L.Class.extend({ 24 options: { 25 serviceUrl: '//router.project-osrm.org/viaroute', 26 geometryPrecision: 6 27 }, are getting file:// appended to the front (file://router.project-...


3

You cannot use lines as stop inputs for a network analysis. The only way you could possibly use the lines is to set them as barriers but give them a negative value (ie, rather than adding time, they take time away) such that they attract the route rather than avoid it. You still have to set stops though. If centroids are not sufficient, it would be ...


3

You'll need to use Network Analyst for this. The first thing you will need to do is turn your lines into a network. The Network Analyst Tutorial exercise 1 covers this, but be aware it may not go into sufficient depth, as there are geometry and topology considerations to take into account. Why isn't the service layer shape properly spread out? touches on ...


3

The route geometry you get is a encoded polyline. You can create a route from it as follows: // route is ol.geom.LineString var route = new ol.format.Polyline({ factor: 1e6 }).readGeometry(polyline, { dataProjection: 'EPSG:4326', featureProjection: 'EPSG:3857' }); var feature = new ol.Feature(route); feature.setStyle(styles.route); vectorSource....


3

With Latest API use overview simplified (default), full, false Add overview geometry either full, simplified according to highest zoom level it could be display on, or not at all. curl 'http://router.project-osrm.org/route/v1/driving/-1.8744130630953275,52.45318441573963;-1.879401971863028,52.451059431849615;-1.8783612747652496,52.44962092302177;-1....


3

Consider adding "Point" cost barriers. See Barriers.


3

It is all preference, so think about it from the perspective of users, and balance that with how difficult it is to produce, and how much the details stray from the road. I have used GTFS extensively, and know that these details help with things like estimating how fast a vehicle is scheduled to travel (comparing it to a real-time tracking feed), or when it ...


3

If you have vector roads data then the new (>2.14) trace tool in advanced feature editing should work for you.


3

EDIT: I deleted my previous answer as it was wrong. First big mistake I made was performing dot and cross products using spherical coordinates. One needs to convert them to Cartesian first. (I didn't figure out how to type in math, so I'm pasting images showing all the math). Below is the python implementation: def spherical2Cart(lat,lon): clat=(90-...


3

This is a really interesting question. I think that the zig-zag is the optimal geometry because this is the path that light would take if both boundaries were mirrors. The slight overlap in area is made up for by the increased efficiency in spanning the square, when walking at an angle to the edge. While writing R code, we might, therefore want to choose ...


3

If your road network is a local file or database, QGIS 3.0 has a Processing algorithm which will generate a routable version of it and can generate routes between all the point features in a source/dest layer.


3

I solved this problem with clues from @FelixIP's answer, and great help from the answer I found at How to sum line features. Step 1: Make sure all overlapping lines are actually overlapping. Using Integrate tool helps. Step 2: Use Merge to combine all the individual polylines into one shapefile. Step 3: Create a polygon that is large enough to cover the ...


3

Unless you simply want to link the points with a straight line you would need to use a route API. The are several alternatives which work by making an xhr get request which returns a json containing a set of results from which a linestring can be extracted. All need an API key and (unless you want to pay) there will be some usage limits. Input and output ...


3

Given the coordinates of A, B and C, and knowing that the angle in D is straight, we do not need to know the distance between B and D. We could calculate it, but in truth it is not necessary to know the coordinates of D. Consider the straight spherical triangle formed by the vertices A, B, and D, with right angle in D. Let alpha be the angle in A. Knowing ...


3

I truly believe that I have got your question correctly. Thus, you want an offset where transport lines share same geometry otherwise they have to remain at the same place. Let's assume there is a point layer "transport_routes" with its corresponding attribute table accordingly, see image below. For Labelling I used this expression: ...


3

You could do this using QGIS and the TravelTime plugin. You can turn lines into points using method 2 in this tutorial https://wiki.tuflow.com/index.php?title=QGIS_Convert_Lines_to_Points. Once you have the line you can create isochrone shapes from every point, do this using the Time Map feature, there's a walk through of how to do it here https://docs....


3

You can also do it with the QNEAT3 Plugin: https://plugins.qgis.org/plugins/QNEAT3/ I have a line which is 7.7 km long, represented by 1112 points, so ca. one point every 7 meters. To get the points from a line, use densify by count: https://docs.qgis.org/3.10/de/docs/user_manual/processing_algs/qgis/vectorgeometry.html#densify-by-count Than I have a network ...


2

Adding points along polyline: Editor Tool See this answer for your directional arrows using a two layered symbol. As to plugins, try ET-Geowizards


2

ArcGIS Network Analyst provides network-based spatial analysis, such as routing, fleet routing, travel directions, closest facility, service area, and location-allocation. Using ArcGIS Network Analyst, you can dynamically model realistic network conditions, including one-way streets, turn and height restrictions, speed limits, and variable travel speeds ...


2

You need to supply a table. This can be a .dbf file, a geodatabase table, or a sheet of an Excel file. I'd recommend exporting Excel/.dbf to a geodatabase table to make sure the field data types are converted properly. After you've supplied the table, you will need to provide several fields (basically map your input table fields to the required in-fields). ...


2

Please check this one, give corresponding credits to authors https://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/globalmarine/data Enjoy EDIT: Shipping routes are there: raw_2008_shipping_mol.zip https://knb.ecoinformatics.org/#view/doi:10.5063/F1S180FS


2

It is a traveling saleman problem with skills (some name it technician routing and scheduling problem). For your problem you require both, (i) an algorithm that calculates the least cost path from one location to another AND (ii) an algorithm that calculates the best sequence of locations given your start and end location and additional constraints such as ...


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