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9

If you reproject the polygon data to Asia Lambert Conic (not just On-the-fly, but really reprojecting all vertex coordinates into a new file), you can dissolve the polygons by a common attribute. This should remove the common border line. If it does not work in first run, have a closer look at the border line. There may be a small gap after the reprojection,...


7

There is the Albers Equal Area Conic for Russia. It seems to be the projection used for scientific mapping for the entirety of Russia. It is probably the best equal area that balances distances and shape (that I have found or can think of). http://spatialreference.org/ref/sr-org/albers-equal-area-russia/ Here is a soil map with that projection for an ...


4

The two answers pretty much cover it and are not really contradictory. Shutting down those stations will mean no broadcast correction signal will be available to recievers tuned to the US GPS network in that area. The other GPS systems don't use that same network - they have their own ground stations. And as Mapperz points out, there are different kinds of ...


3

As I could see, you could crossreferene osm data with терсон names. For instance: Верхнеколымский улус from http://std.gmcrosstata.ru matches with http://atd.osm.rambler.ru/r1399830.html and there are OSM Relation/Way ids for nested territories. That's the id of Верхнеколымский улус http://www.openstreetmap.org/relation/1399830 (you could find it on list ...


3

You can download administrative shapefiles from here. Simply select Russia as your Country and Administrative areas as your Subject. You will receive 3 shapefiles of differing administrative levels so you can choose what level you would like. Here is are some attributes for the lowest level: Hope this helps.


2

Found the data, finally. Here. Found it by pure chance, after searching for years, literally. Don't know much about the source of the data, except it's from a Moscow design bureau's git. They might have gotten it from the Russian NGO Memorial, they have a lot of data but I was never able to find it georeferenced.


2

There is the GADM database where you can download Russian boundaries in a variety of formats suitable for QGIS: http://gadm.org/country Commercial use of the data is not permitted, however you may download and use freely otherwise.


2

You may use the datasets available from DIVA-GIS. If you select your country (Russian Federation), you will access to data (as raster or vector maps) about: Administrative areas; Inland waters; Roads; Railroads; Elevation; Land cover; Population.


2

Since your asking for maps from 1940 what are you primarily wanting to see, do you want to see the Soviet Union at its maximum extant right before the German Invasion (ie do you want to see the Polish Partition and the Baltic Republics as part of Russia?) During that time period maps of Europe were changing fairly often. The 1939 map below is a basic ...


2

Note, that feature class is one multipolygon comprised of 839 polygons. If you run the multipart to singlepart tool, you'll see that. Anyway, the simplest way is to just turn off the border in the layer symbology: Dissolving or merging would also work IF those two polygons were adjacent, however there is actually a slight gap. So you would have to: ...


1

It looks like you have two polygons, with the edge along meridian. Use 'dissolve' to make two polygons into one.


1

Maybe these maps can help you https://www.ethnologue.com/language/rus Do you speak russian? The english version of census website dont have much information http://www.gks.ru/free_doc/new_site/m-sotrudn/eng_site/sensus.html


1

You can find detail article (on Russian) about toWGS84 transformation on this link: http://gis-lab.info/qa/datum-transform-sets.html In short - this is 7 parameter coefficients to transform from WGS84 datum to PZ90 datum


1

Check out these sites, there are a lot of topographics maps: Wołyń Mapy archiwalne WIG


1

Apparently there seems to be no such source... the closest I could get to is using textual sources describing the time zone changes in detail for different admin areas and then composing the shapefiles myself from available shapefiles of the Russian admin areas, e.g. with QGIS or ArcMap. The best text sources describing the changes that I could find are: ...


1

Have you looked into open street map (https://www.openstreetmap.org)? As far as I understand, they have the most updated vector data (boundaries etc) as it is continuously done on a voluntary basis from around the world.


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